Storm Dennis: Scotland warned as snow and ice yet to come

The extreme weather conditions are set to continue as freezing temperatures sweep across the country.

The Met Office has put out a yellow warning for snow and ice for most parts of Scotland.

Snow showers and icy surfaces may lead to some travel disruption and anyone wishing to travel during the bad weather is urged to with caution.

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The warning is in place from this afternoon until about 11am tomorrow.

The main areas affected include Central, Tayside and Fife, Grampian, Dumfries and Galloway, Strathclyde and the Scottish Borders.

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"1-2 cm is likely above around 200 m, with 3-5 cm possible above 400 m. Showers will be accompanied by strong westerly winds which may lead to some drifting.

"Ice may also form on untreated surfaces."

Snow showers and icy surfaces may lead to some travel disruption and anyone wishing to travel during the bad weather is urged to with caution picture: GettyImages and Met Office

Major travel disruptions have happened across the country with some residents having to be evacuated from town's in the Scottish Borders due to severe flooding.

Anyone wishing to travel during this time is advised to check timetables and use the roads with care.

Storm Dennis is the second storm in just a week to hit the country with bad weather.

Storm Ciara blasted most parts of the UK with high winds and heavy rainfall leading to flight cancellations, flooding and bridge closures.

Many parts of the UK have seen the worst weather conditions "on record."

Scottish Borders Council said Hawick's Slitrig Water, the Jed Water at Chesters and the Liddel Water at Newcastleton all reached record high levels.

Three sections of separate rivers in the Scottish Borders reached their highest recorded level on Saturday, with some river gauges showing water levels rising by more than 1.5m in less than three hours.

The Environment Agency (EA) has said the river level in Hereford has reached the highest on record.

Speaking from Worcester, the EA's West Midlands environment manager David Throup told Sky News: "I think it's peaking now in Hereford, the levels that you've got there are truly exceptional levels, they are the highest levels we've ever recorded on the River Wye and those records go back 200 years, so we are talking very, very exceptional levels.

"Here in Worcester, the River Severn is also at a level that is similar to the big floods in 2007."