Welsh Labour leader says Scotland should get second independence referendum

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The Welsh First Minister has declared Scotland should get a second independence referendum - if that's what the country's voters want.

Speaking following a joint press conference yesterday alongside Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon, Mark Drakeford told the BBC "it's up to the people of the four nations to make decisions for themselves in these matters".

Nicola Sturgeon and Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford at their joint press conference

Nicola Sturgeon and Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford at their joint press conference

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The Welsh Labour leader said: "If the Scottish people want a referendum, it's for them to decide. If they want to opt for a different future, it's for them to decide."

When it was pointed out to Mr Drakeford that Scottish Labour disagreed with that stance, he replied: "Well in Wales that's the decision we would take."

He added: "If there was a majority in Wales in favour of a referendum, then people in Wales should have a referendum. But it's for them to decide and not me. And it's for people in Scotland to that that debate and that argument."

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has refused to grant a "section 30" order that would allow a second referendum to be legally staged in Scotland.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon

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Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said yesterday - after holding talks with Mr Johnson surrounding Brexit - that a second Scottish independence referendum "would not be an early priority" for a Labour government.

Mr Drakeford said: "In the end it is the unionists who will see off the Union because of their carelessness about it, about their unwillingness to give the kind of time and attention and thought that needs to be given to how the United Kingdom will operate successfully the other side of the European Union.

"And in a position in which the National Assembly for Wales and the Scottish Parliament were asked for their consent, were both parliaments to deny that consent, that is a very serious constitutional moment and the UK Government needs to give it the serious consideration that it deserves."

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford