Tory councillor quits and backs Lib Dems in key marginal seat ahead of election

Councillor Linda Holt has quit the Tories and is now backing the Lib Dems in the UK's most marginal constituency. Picture: Andrew Beveridge
Councillor Linda Holt has quit the Tories and is now backing the Lib Dems in the UK's most marginal constituency. Picture: Andrew Beveridge
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A Conservative councillor in Fife has quit the party and revealed she will now back the Lib Dems in a key marginal constituency at next week's general election.

Linda Holt, who represents the East Neuk and Landward ward, sent her letter of resignation to party bosses on Monday in protest at what she called "deep-rooted dysfunction in the party at local association, council group and Scottish levels".

The former deputy leader of the Conservative group on Fife Council will now sit at as independent.

The councillor, whose ward is in the UK's most marginal Westminster constituency, will now vote Lib Dem. The North East Fife seat is being defended by the SNP's Stephen Gethins with a majority of just two.

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“I remain a unionist, and will be voting for the Lib Dem candidate Wendy Chamberlain in the general election,” she told The Courier.

“Voting Labour or Conservative in NE Fife is a wasted vote, which only increases the risk of returning an SNP MP and amplifying the nationalist clamour for a second independence referendum.”

She continued: “My decision has been a long time coming, and reflects a growing awareness of the deep-rooted dysfunction in the party at local association, council group and Scottish levels.

“This dysfunction has not only demoralised and alienated supporters, it also prevents the party from being proactive in fighting for the interests of ordinary Fifers.”

Dave Dempsey, the Tory leader on Fife Council, told the paper: “I certainly don’t recognise the party that she describes at all, either locally or nationally, and I suspect the dysfunction she talks about is more in her relationship with the party in Fife rather than the party itself.”