Theresa May’s convoy involved in crash on Belgium visit

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May lays a wreath as Belgium's Prime Minister Charles Michel stands behind during the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War at the Saint-Symphorien Military Cemetery, near Mons. Picture; Getty
Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May lays a wreath as Belgium's Prime Minister Charles Michel stands behind during the commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War at the Saint-Symphorien Military Cemetery, near Mons. Picture; Getty

A vehicle in Theresa May’s convoy has been involved in a crash during her visit to France and Belgium ahead of Armistice Day

The Prime Minister was travelling in a convoy along with Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel when the collision occurred.

It is believed two outriders were injured involved in the collision and both Prime Ministers are safe.

According to reports motorcyclists had to perform an emergency manoeuvre,and clipped the vehicle of one of his colleagues, according to local reports and both fell off their bikes.

It is being described as an accident and is not believed to be terror related.

Theresa May is visiting war cemeteries in Belgium and France alongside French President Emmanuel Macron and Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel.

In the note left by the resting place of Private Parr, Mrs May quoted a line of wartime poetry - The Soldier written by Rupert Brooke.

She wrote: “There is in that rich earth a richer dust concealed.”

The sonnet was written by Brooke, an officer in the Royal Navy, while on leave at Christmas and formed part of a collection of work entitled 1914 which was published in January 1915.

Brooke never experienced front-line combat and died from blood poisoning on April 23 1915 after being bitten by a mosquito while sailing to Gallipoli. He was buried on the island of Skyros.

At the grave of Private Ellison, also in blue pen on a headed Downing Street card attached to the garland of poppies, Mrs May wrote: “They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted ... We will remember them.”

This was from another poem written by Laurence Binyon and published in September 1914 which is often quoted in Remembrance Sunday services.

During the brief visit, she and Mr Michel then met British and Belgian serving members of the armed forces.

As she left she thanked organisers for what had been a moving visit.