Scots anxious about impact of independence on financial prospects

Some Scots are concerned about what independence might mean for their finances. Picture: Reuters
Some Scots are concerned about what independence might mean for their finances. Picture: Reuters
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SCOTS have expressed reservations about the impact independence may have on the economy, according to a new poll today.

The Ipsos MORI survey found more people thought economic conditions would get worse rather than improve. The poll of 1,005 people asked for views based on the next five years or

under independence.

For personal finance, 34 per cent thought things will be better in five years, compared to 30 per cent worrying prospects will worsen.

Under independence, the share changes with 22 per cent expecting an improvement and 36 per cent saying they fear conditions will worsen.

Calculating the difference shows a net optimism of 4 per cent in the next five years compared with -14 per cent under independence.

However, about one-third of respondents thought conditions will stay the same in both scenarios, giving either side of the independence debate anopportunity to be encouraged.

Mark Diffley, research director at Ipsos MORI Scotland, said: “We know that economic issues are likely to dominate the forthcoming debates over Scotland’s constitutional future. Our latest data shows that levels of economic optimism fall when the public consider the prospect of Scotland becoming independent.”

The only area to score a positive result, when independence is assumed, was the prospect of Scotland’s standing in the world being improved.

The poll showed 39 per cent expect an improvement in five years, compared with 17 per cent assuming a deterioration.

Under independence, the shares change with 42 per cent expecting an improvement and 33 per cent worrying the country’s standing will be worse.

However, the net optimism score still falls from 22 per cent to just 9 per cent.