Photographer snaps sinister face in sky above Brig o’ Doon

Photographer Scott Wanstall got more than he bargained for after spotting a spooky face of a woman in the clouds above the Brig o'Doon in Ayrshire. Picture: SWNS
Photographer Scott Wanstall got more than he bargained for after spotting a spooky face of a woman in the clouds above the Brig o'Doon in Ayrshire. Picture: SWNS
0
Have your say

This is the moment a photographer got more than he bargained for - after spotting a sinister face in the clouds above the bridge featured in Tam o’Shanter.

The scary image was captured by Scott Wanstall when he was taking pictures of the Brig o’ Doon - the bridge made famous by one of Robert Burns’ most beloved poems.

It was not until the 26-year-old from Ayr, South Ayrshire, was at home editing his night’s work that the witch became obvious to him.

The stunning picture was taken on Tuesday evening.

The story of Tam o’ Shanter is of a drunkard farmer having a narrow escape from a chasing pack of a coven of witches on his way home from the pub.

He flees them by crossing the Brig o’ Doon, because according to folklore witches cannot cross running water, but not before one witch grabs the tail of his horse.

• READ MORE: Five of Robert Burns’ most famous poems

Scott said some people had called him weird for spotting the face in the clouds.

He said: “I have always wanted to capture a picture of the Brig o’ Doon, so on the 2nd of January I went down there to see if I can capture it at its best lighting and the right atmosphere.

“Funny enough, I would like to say it was probably my best angle considering the way the clouds were shaped and it was a full moon where I managed to capture the picture.

“Some people call me weird but when I got home to edit it, that’s when I noticed it, the bridge had a face above the centre of it.

“That was a bit ironic, I would like to think that the face above the bridge is the witch.”

The bridge, located near Alloway and crossing the Rover Doon in Aryshire, Scotland flows 23 miles from Loch Doon, joining the Firth of Clyde just South of Ayr.

It is thought to have been built in the early fifteenth century.

READ MORE: Scottish history timeline from 1054 to 2014