The Waiting Game: Glengoyne whisky to reveal new Jonathon Keats artwork in iconic Glasgow restaurant - and the piece will take 50 years to fully unveil

Artwork by revered conceptual artist Jonathon Keats to be unveiled in famous Glasgow restaurant – very slowly.

The work, commissioned by Glengoyne, features a poem produced by Scottish Jamaican poet Jeda Pearl which explores the concept of time and will take 50 years before it is fully revealed.

It will be hung in Ubiquitous Chip in Glasgow’s West End as it prepares to celebrate it’s 50 birthday.

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The words of the poem have been covered by a layer of UV-sensitive ink through a specialised printing technique, and this ink will slowly fade when exposed to ultraviolet light.

The ink will slowly fade when exposed to ultraviolet light to reveal Jeda’s poem, ‘mynd oor gloamin corrieneuchin’, to patrons of the famous venue in the coming decades.

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This will reveal Pearls poem ‘mynd oor gloamin corrieneuchin’ and the work was inspired by Glengoyne’s ‘unhurried’ approach to whisky making.

Jeda Pearl explained: “Inspired by Glengoyne's location and the slow patience of craftsmanship, I wanted this poem to capture the beautiful sense of timelessness and slow growth while walking in nature and those intimate conversations we have with friends which could last all night.”

Colin Clydesdale, co-owner of the Ubiquitous Chip whose father Ronnie founded the restaurant in 1971, added: “The Chip has always enjoyed a strong connection to Scotland’s arts scene, and the decision to be part of this new project featuring such outstanding artistic talent was an easy one to make. It’s an honour.

“We have been here for 50 years – and serving fine whisky has always been a big part of that – and the thought that people will continue to come here for another five decades to enjoy a dram and appreciate such innovative art is rather lovely.”

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