First look: Revellers brave freezing waters of the Firth of Forth for 'Loony Dook' event

The Loony Dook is staged against the iconic backdrop of the Forth Bridge.
The Loony Dook is staged against the iconic backdrop of the Forth Bridge.
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More than 1000 revellers, many clad in fancy dress, took part in Edinburgh's annual Loony Dook event to herald the start of a new decade.

The New Year's Day tradition at South Queensferry, which dates back to 1987, saw all participants parading through its historic streets before entering the water.

Thousands of spectators secured vantage points around the town to watch the annual spectacle, which was led by The Noise Committee drummers, unfold.

Organisers ring-fence £1 from the sale of each ticket to support the RNLI, which helps ensure the safety of participants each year.

The Loony Dook tradition dates back to 1986 when a group of locals dreamt up the idea for the event as a way of shaking off their hangovers from the previous evening.

The event quickly grew in popularity and is one of the first to sell-out in the Hogmanay festival each year.

The Maid of the Forth vessel was honoured by some of the participants in the Loony Dook.

The Maid of the Forth vessel was honoured by some of the participants in the Loony Dook.

New Year's Day dips are now a regular fixture in villages, towns and beaches across Scotland, including Kinghorn, in Fife, Broughty Ferry, in Tayside, and North Berwick, in East Lothian.

The Loony Dook was one of the final events to be held as part of Edinburgh's three-day Hogmanay festival, which organisers said was expected to have attracted more than 180,000 attendees.

It was also one of the first events to be staged under the banner of Scotland's first official "Year of Coasts and Waters."

Thousands of spectators gathered to watch the annual spectacle of the Loony Dook unfold.

Thousands of spectators gathered to watch the annual spectacle of the Loony Dook unfold.

Many participants wore the bare minimum costumes to brave the icy waters of the Forth.

Many participants wore the bare minimum costumes to brave the icy waters of the Forth.

Around 1100 participants took part in the sold-out Loony Dook, one of the last events in Edinburgh's Hogmanay festival.

Around 1100 participants took part in the sold-out Loony Dook, one of the last events in Edinburgh's Hogmanay festival.

The Loony Dook participants paraded through South Queensferry before leaping into the Forth.

The Loony Dook participants paraded through South Queensferry before leaping into the Forth.