Danny MacAskill urges his fans to put down their phones and 'get into the real world' as new video is unveiled

Danny MacAskill's new video was made around Scotland over the last two years.
Danny MacAskill's new video was made around Scotland over the last two years.
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He is one of Scotland’s biggest ever online stars, with his spectacular cycling stunts having been seen an estimated 350 million times so far.

But now Danny MacAskill has urged his army of followers to consider scaling back the amount of time they spend online – and head into the great outdoors instead.

The street trials rider, who shot to fame with his first video a decade ago, used the launch of his latest to raise concerns about the impact of addiction to “the digital world.”

Danny Daycare sees MacAskill whisk two-year-old Daisy Thomson on a whirlwind adventure taking in favourite spots in Aberfoyle, Killin, Dunkeld, Dalgety Bay and his native Skye.

Daisy, daughter of director Stu Thomson, features throughout the film Danny Daycare, although a stunt doll was used for the tricks, including a “barrell roll” flip which took 16 days to practise and film over several months.

MacAskill, who admitted he loses around an hour of sleep thanks to late-night scrolling, said: “I’m aware that this film is adding to the whole digital world. It’s really about finding the right balance.

Killin, Aberfoyle, Dunkeld, Dalgety Bay and Skye are all featured in MacAskill's new Danny Daycare video.

Killin, Aberfoyle, Dunkeld, Dalgety Bay and Skye are all featured in MacAskill's new Danny Daycare video.

“I like to think that my videos hopefully inspire people to get out and about, are a bit aspirational and are not just for hard-core riders.

“The digital world can offer lots of inspiration and create opportunities. But our phones can also be very addictive.

"At least we can put them down now. I think we’re going to be connected all the time in future. Schools may have to have responsibility for getting kids out and about in future whether they like it or not.

“It happened to be bikes I got into when I was growing up on Skye. I started to get more seriously into them by reading magazines back then. I barely used a computer at school and mobile phones were only coming in when I was leaving.

“The outdoors are all still exactly the same as when I was young. It’s important for people to put their phone down and get out into the real world."

Meanwhile MacAskill has spoken out over Skye’s over-tourism issues, saying there was a clear need for new infrastructure to handle tourism.

He said: “It is tricky for Skye. My dad has been running a museum in Dunvegan for the last 30 years. Tourism is obviously a big part of Skye’s livelihood, especially in the summer, but it is becoming harder on the island’s infrastructure.

“A lot of the nicer places are only accessible on single track roads. As soon as you’ve got a lot of people driving on them it becomes problematic. A lot of people want to go there just to have their picture taken.

“The increase in tourism on Skye is obviously bringing a lot more money into the island.

“It would be a nightmare for the locals, but maybe it’s time to start looking at bringing in tolls to pay for new infrastructure.”