Amazing close-up pictures show extremely rare albino squirrel climbing wall in Musselburgh

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David Shields managed to get within a few feet of the animal.

Experts say the chances of a squirrel being born completely white are around one in 100,000...

The rare albino squirrel was spotted climbing a harled wall in Musselburgh. Pic: David Shields.

The rare albino squirrel was spotted climbing a harled wall in Musselburgh. Pic: David Shields.

But one resident in Musselburgh stumbled across a rare albino squirrel on his way to work in Musselburgh this week.

READ MORE: Pictures emerge of extremely rare albino squirrel spotted in Kirkliston

David Shields spotted the creature as it scurried up a harled wall in the 'Pinkie' area of the town on Wednesday morning.

The 44-year-old support worker said: "Then it obligingly stood still for long enough to let me take a few snaps, before leaping over the wall out of sight.

The rare albino squirrel. Pic: David Shields.

The rare albino squirrel. Pic: David Shields.

"I was in shock at first I think. I Couldn't believe what I'd seen and knew that it was a very rare occurrence. I was delighted to get the opportunity to picture it from a few feet away. Apparently a one in 100,000 chance. Pity it wasn't a scratch card!"

The pictures have emerged just a few months after Barnton resident Richard Brand photographed a family of albino squirrels in his back garden in the summer. The pictures showed one of the rodents eating from a bird feeder.

And in late August, a rare albino squirrel was photographed by Michelle Dearn as it crossed a road in Kirkliston.

READ MORE: Pictured: Trio of rare albino squirrels spotted in Edinburgh garden

Experts believe the chances of a squirrel being born completely white are around one in one hundred thousand.

Previous reports from wildlife organisations have said that only about 50 such creatures are thought to live in the UK.

The Scottish Wildlife Trust has also stated that albino squirrels can be more vulnerable to predators than red and grey squirrels because they stand out in the environment and have poorer eyesight.