Why I’m delighted by a man’s violent death – Hayley Matthews

Unidentified elephants killed a poacher in Kruger National Park in South Africa (Picture: Robert Perry)
Unidentified elephants killed a poacher in Kruger National Park in South Africa (Picture: Robert Perry)
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A poacher in South Africa’s Kruger National Park was killed by elephants and then eaten by lions. In world where many species are being devastated by humans, Hayley Matthews is pleased that the tables were turned for once.

It’s lovely to have a little good news now and then which, for me, usually entails an animal winning at life, overcoming the despair and devastation that us humans cause them.

All over the internet at the start of the week was the news of the poacher who was killed by an elephant and then eaten by lions in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Yes I’m delighted at this, one less poacher devastating the wildlife is a good news day for me.

READ MORE: Discover lions, elephants and rhino in amazing Kruger safari

After reading that on Saturday Hong Kong airport seized the biggest haul of rhino horn in five years, valued at £1.6m, I’m pleased to see the wildlife getting their own back. Mind you no animal is capable of being evil, it would have purely been for survival. I’m tired of hearing news of people taking out a mother bear while her cubs scream and seeing photos online of them standing all smug beside a lifeless, blood-covered body.

I don’t know how anyone can justify such killings, be for “sport” or the illegal trade of their body parts. It is insane, needless and should not be happening. Sneaking up on a defenceless animal with a gun, intent on killing it purely in the name of human ego is just barbaric. So yes, I am elated at the news of one poacher succumbing to the wonders of the wildlife. Oh how the tables have turned.

Apparently all that was left of the poacher was a skull and a pair of trousers. Still too much if you ask me.

READ MORE: BBC wildlife presenter Saba Douglas-Hamilton shares her love of elephants