Leader: Britain doesn’t want election to prolong the agony

MP Dominic Grieve has been one of the most prominent Conservative Remainers. Picture: Daniel Leal-Olivas/Getty
MP Dominic Grieve has been one of the most prominent Conservative Remainers. Picture: Daniel Leal-Olivas/Getty
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News that the MP for Beaconsfield has lost a confidence vote might not appear too important in Scotland, but Dominic Grieve has been one of the few Conservatives on Brexit who have listened, responded with maturity and attempted to find a way out of the parliamentary impasse. If we believe that the House of Commons is a global laughing stock, Grieve is one of the few members of parliament who has surely emerged with some credit from this whole debacle.

As the deadlock continues, many are now predicting that a general election is the likely step in finding a solution.

But what would it really achieve?

Whether it was Theresa May or another Conservative leader, the likelihood would be a hung parliament. And given that both Labour and Tory are split on Brexit, no-one could be relied on to vote on traditional party lines.

The first-past-the-post system will also make it difficult for new political parties, such as the Change UK grouping, to gain much traction.

A People’s Vote – or Final Say referendum – is the most straightforward way out of this.

Whatever emerges from parliament – Theresa May’s deal or a compromise borne out of the indicative votes – can be put to the people, along with the option to remain in 
the EU.

If Leave wins again – and they may well do – then no one can deny that option. Not Dominic Grieve, Jacob Rees-Mogg, the European Union or the SNP.

And after all, how can more democracy be a negation of democracy? If this is what Britain truly wants then it will say so emphatically again.