Former Police Scotland chief handed new role in England after resignation

The former chief constable of Police Scotland, who quit amid bullying claims, has reportedly been given a new role inspecting forces in England and Wales. Picture: steven scott taylor / J P License
The former chief constable of Police Scotland, who quit amid bullying claims, has reportedly been given a new role inspecting forces in England and Wales. Picture: steven scott taylor / J P License
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The former chief constable of Police Scotland, who quit amid bullying claims, has reportedly been given a new role inspecting forces in England and Wales.

Phil Gormley, who resigned in February amid ongoing investigations into the allegations, is expected to be announced as an inspector of constabulary south of the Border.

He denied any wrongdoing, and resigned after saying it would have been “impossible for me to resume my duties in a meaningful way prior to the end of my contract”.

The role will see Mr Gormley assess and report on the efficiency and effectiveness of 12 police forces in the north of England. He will start in the role on 22 October.

Mr Gormley, formerly chief constable of Norfolk Constabulary, was investigated by the Police Investigations and Review Commissioner (Pirc) over allegations of bullying.

The conduct, which was the subject of one of the allegations, would if proved amount to “gross misconduct”, the commissioner said.

All misconduct investigations regarding Mr Gormley were closed following his resignation.

The former force chief, who became a police constable in Thames Valley in 1985, has held a string of top jobs in policing, including deputy director general of the National Crime Agency between 2013 and 2015.

He was chief constable of Norfolk for three years from 2010, and deputy chief constable of West Midlands Police from 2007.

From 2003 to 2007 he was a commander in the Metropolitan Police, including overseeing Special Branch at a time when the Special Demonstration Squad was in operation. The unit employed several controversial tactics, including officers using the identities of dead children and having serious relationships with members of groups they were spying on.

Mr Gormley has denied any knowledge of these methods, which are now the major focus of a public inquiry into undercover policing.

If confirmed, his new role would be with Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS).

The body is headed by HM Chief Inspector of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services Sir Tom Winsor.

In addition, there are currently four HM Inspectors of Constabulary. Mr Gormley would be the only person in the role to have worked as a police officer.

Inspectors are appointed by the Queen on the advice of the Home Secretary and Prime Minister.