Ex-police officer weeps and denies theft from mother

A former police officer who used to guard Margaret Thatcher's defence secretary wept in court yesterday as he denied intimidating his elderly mother or taking £60,000 from her bank account.

Stirling Sheriff Court
Stirling Sheriff Court

Former firearms officer Andrew Rough said claims of embezzlement against him and his wife Jean, also a retired police officer, were untrue.

He said his mother, Gladys Rough, 86, who earlier testified against him, had been “influenced” by other family members whom he said “had a grudge”.

Rough, 58, who retired with the rank of sergeant in 2002, said he was “deeply hurt” by her claims.

He told the jury on the eighth day of his trial at Stirling Sheriff Court that he had twice been given commendations during his 27 years of service with Central Scotland Police, once for saving a person who was attacked with a knife, and as a firearms officer had been chosen to guard the late Lord Younger, who lived locally.

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He said that shooting was also his hobby and he had represented the British police seven times in the world clay target shooting championships and shot 
“eight or nine times” for Scotland.

Rough and Jean Rough, also 58, of Alloa, Clackmannanshire, deny taking the money from joint bank accounts held in the name of Gladys and his late father, also called Andrew, who died last year.

The embezzlement is alleged to have occurred between October 2010 and July 2015, after Andrew Rough senior had suffered a stroke, and was in hospital and then in a care home, and the old lady gave the couple her bank card.

Gladys Rough told the court earlier she had handed over the card so her son and daughter-in-law could fetch her shopping.

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The trial continues.