Call for tougher climate action to step up efforts for greener future

Scots have cut the carbon footprint of their household energy consumption by a quarter since the Scottish Climate Change Act was passed. Picture: Getty
Scots have cut the carbon footprint of their household energy consumption by a quarter since the Scottish Climate Change Act was passed. Picture: Getty
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Scots have cut the carbon footprint of their household energy consumption by a quarter since the Scottish Climate Change Act was passed.

The most recent official figures show domestic emissions north of the Border fell by an average of 25 per cent between 2009 and 2015.

Highlanders have achieved the biggest reductions, with a drop of 30 per cent in six years. West Lothian has reported the lowest cuts at 21.6 per cent.

Analysis shows greenhouse gas emissions caused by people using electricity, gas and other fuels to power and heat their homes has dropped steadily, with Scotland’s electricity supply becoming significantly decarbonised.

Environmentalists say the reductions are down to a combination of factors, including an increase in renewable energy, more efficient homes and appliances and government climate change policies.

Renewables now provide more than half of the country’s electricity generation,

The latest figures have been welcomed, but campaigners say more must be done to hit the 2050 target for net-zero emissions.

Gina Hanrahan, acting head of policy at WWF Scotland, said: “The Scottish Parliament’s first Climate Change Act put us at the forefront of a global energy transition.

“These figures show that individuals across Scotland and governments at every level have played a part in cutting the climate damage of our home energy usage.”

She added: “This analysis shows Scotland’s low-carbon transition is working but we must step up our efforts.

“A new Climate Change Bill this year is an opportunity to double down on our commitments to make our homes more energy-efficient, to increase the use of renewables to heat homes and put Scotland on the path to a zero-carbon future.”