Scotland's weather is notoriously unreliable

These are the 15 Scottish towns and cities that get the most sunshine - is yours on the list?

Scotland tends to get a bad rap when it comes to the weather. And while it's true that rain is an integral part of the Scottish experience, some parts of the country are much sunnier than others.

Based on data from the Met Office, these are some of Scotland's sunniest towns and cities. Some smaller localities have not been included. Wondering where the worst weather spots in Scotland are? Follow this link to find out which Scottish towns and cities have the wettest weather.

Academic reputation may not be the only thing attracting students to St Andrews: the town sees just over 1560 hours of sun per year, surpassing the UK average of 1493 hours.

1. St Andrews, Fife

Academic reputation may not be the only thing attracting students to St Andrews: the town sees just over 1560 hours of sun per year, surpassing the UK average of 1493 hours.
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Arbroath is the largest town in Angus and comes just behind St Andrews with over 1535 hours of sunshine per year.

2. Arbroath, Angus

Arbroath is the largest town in Angus and comes just behind St Andrews with over 1535 hours of sunshine per year.
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Right across the county of Ayreshire, including in Kilmarnock and Irvine, locals enjoy over 1435 hours of sunshine a year, falling just behind the UK average.

3. Ayr, South Ayreshire

Right across the county of Ayreshire, including in Kilmarnock and Irvine, locals enjoy over 1435 hours of sunshine a year, falling just behind the UK average.
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Coming just ahead of the capital, the granite city - Aberdeen - gets an average of 1435.7 hours sunshine per year. It does, however, see more rain than average with around 814.9 mm falling annually.

4. Aberdeen

Coming just ahead of the capital, the granite city - Aberdeen - gets an average of 1435.7 hours sunshine per year. It does, however, see more rain than average with around 814.9 mm falling annually.
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