Northern Lights Scotland: Experts predict aurora borealis could be visible in Scottish skies on Friday - if the cloud clears

Look to the skies tonight and you might just catch a glimpse of a celestial spectacular.

According to the Met Office’s space and weather forecast there is a chance that the Northern Lights will be visible in Scotland on Friday night (September 30).

Experts say that a fast stream of solar wind will mean an increased likelihood of views of the aurora borealis across the country – particularly in the north.

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And, although stormy weather is forecast during the day, skies could clear by this evening.

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A major tourist industry has become established in recent years, charging people desperate to experience the phenomenon large amounts for trips to vast and dark wildernesses in Iceland and Scandinavia.

But the truth is that Scotland is far north enough to offer a decent chance to see the aurora borealis, and has plenty of locations where the skies are dark enough for the lights to shine.

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They’ve even been seen in Edinburgh in recent times.

The moving patterns of green, blue, purple and red are caused by solar storms on the surface of the sun, which create clouds of electrically charged particles that are forcefully expelled.

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The aurora borealis is one of the most spectacular sights you can experience in the skies over Scotland.

Some of these particles collide with the Earth, with some becoming caught in the planet’s magnetic field, where they are attracted to the north and south poles.

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This collection of particles collide with atoms and molecules already present in the atmosphere, heating them up and causing them to glow – creating the Northern Lights.

The closer you are to the North Pole, the higher your chance of seeing them, with most of Scotland in the zone where they are – in theory – regularly visible.

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And autumn is one of the best times to catch a display, with long cold nights and (hopefully) clear skies providing the perfect conditions.

Aurora hunters may want to head out of the city, as light pollution can ruin the view, and face the northern horizon.

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Of course you need to be lucky, but a regular check of the Aurora Watch website, which measures the amount of solar activity each day, will let you know when it’s worth heading out to try your luck.

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