No new Michelin stars for Scottish restaurants as chefs question value of awards

Andrew Fairlie retained his two-star award (Photo: JP)
Andrew Fairlie retained his two-star award (Photo: JP)
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The Michelin star winners of 2019 have been revealed - and nine Scotland eateries have retained their coveted Michelin stars.

There were no new Michelin stars for Scottish restaurants at the annual Michelin Star Revelation event last night, with Andrew Fairlie at Gleneagles remaining the only two-starred restaurant north of the border and just one of 20 restaurants with the accolade in the UK.

Four Edinburgh restaurants continued to meet the tyre brand's lofty standards with Martin Wishart, Kitchin, 21212 and Number One at the Balmoral each retaining their one-star awards.

Fife establishments The Peat Inn and The Cellar also retained their one-star awards, as did Isle of Skye restaurant Loch Bay and Ayrshire's Braidwoods.

The Boath House in Nairn and Albannach in Lochinver both lost their stars due to changes in business models, while Martin Wishart at Loch Lomond lost its star due to a catastrophic fire which tore through Cameron House and forced its closure.

The awards are delivered to restaurants that deliver "high quality cooking, worth a stop".

Chefs' frustrations with Michelin awards

The country's top chefs were quick to question the absence of any new Michelin-starred restaurants, despite a record 21 new stars being awarded to restaurants in the rest of the UK and Ireland.

Chef Barry Bryson Jack voiced his concerns via Twitter, stating: "Seriously questioning the lack of new #michelin stars for Scotland, although I don’t believe it’s the be all and end all of what a restaurants aim should be but the passion, skill, talent and produce in Scotland is not reflected properly here."

Glasgow restaurants continue to be overlooked by the guide - the last restaurant to feature in the prestigious guide was Gordon Ramsay's Amaryllis which was closed in 2004.

The omission comes just weeks after chef Peter McKenna of Finnieston restaurant The Gannet claimed that there were no stars in the city as Glaswegians were reluctant to pay "£150-a-head" for dinner.

Speaking to The Times McKenna said: "Glasgow doesn't judge its success against whether it has any Michelin star restaurants or not – that's not the way the city thinks.

"If you look at what's on offer now compared with ten or 15 years ago, the eating-out scene has changed immeasurably for the better, both in terms of choice and quality.

"There are some terrific restaurants with consistently high quality here, but Glaswegians are not prepared to pay £150-a-head for dinner, just so that they can say they've eaten in a Michelin star restaurant.

"They want quality, but they also live in the real world."

Dining at Scotland's Michelin-starred restaurants does come at a cost with a seven course tasting menu at Martin Wishart setting diners back £85, and a three-course meal at 21212 costing £70.

A starter, main and dessert at Number One also comes in at £85, as will a 'Chef's Secret Tasting Menu' at the renowned Kitchin.

Royal success

Outside of Scotland the chef who catered for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's wedding has won two Michelin stars with her first attempt with her own restaurant.

Clare Smyth previously became the first British woman to run a restaurant with three stars, when she was heading Restaurant Gordon Ramsay.

But her debut solo restaurant, Core, on Monday entered the coveted guide with two stars after she launched the eatery in Notting Hill, west London, last year.

The accolade comes after Ms Smyth, from County Antrim, cooked for royalty at Harry and Meghan's private wedding reception in Frogmore House, Windsor.

Two other restaurants - London's Kitchen Table at Bubbledogs and Moor Hall, in Aughton, Lancashire - also won two of the prestigious stars.