Dance review: Rambert, Festival Theatre, Edinburgh

Hannah Rudd, Carolyn Bolton, Luke Ahmet and Pierre Tappon perform A Linha Curva PIC: Hugo Glendinning
Hannah Rudd, Carolyn Bolton, Luke Ahmet and Pierre Tappon perform A Linha Curva PIC: Hugo Glendinning
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In the unlikely event that Rambert Dance Company ever has to prove its mettle, this triple-bill should be its first port of call. Three disparate works requiring such a diverse range of skills to execute them, it’s as if a different company steps out onto the stage each time.

Rambert ****

Festival Theatre, Edinburgh

Itzik Galili’s A Linha Curva, has rhythm coursing through its veins, driven by a live four-piece samba band perched high above the dancers. Down below, 22 bodies catch the beat and drive with them, pulsating, jumping and striding across the space with unmitigated joy. And, as they’re not wearing terribly much, we can see the muscle control that gets them there.

Each morning at the Rambert headquarters, you’ll find the dancers taking class – rotating between classical ballet one day, contemporary the next. The technique borne out of that hard work was evident in every second of Andonis Foniadakis’ stunning Symbiosis. Choreographed in close collaboration with composer Ilan Eshkeri, whose dramatic score gave the whole piece a science fiction vibe (aided by the other-worldly set and costume design), Symbiosis flows like a river, entirely abstract yet replete with tiny stories throughout.

Ben Duke took the dancers in an entirely different direction, highlighting their ability to deliver a piece of theatre. Inspired by life outside the rehearsal room, Goat married the songs of Nina Simone (performed beautifully by Nia Lynn) with movement, digital imagery and dialogue that cuts to the heart of being human. Funny, moving and perplexing in equally glorious measure.