Five properties formally owned by famous Scottish poets and painters

J.M. Barrie's first home at 9 Brechin Road in Kirriemuir. Picture: Geograph
J.M. Barrie's first home at 9 Brechin Road in Kirriemuir. Picture: Geograph
0
Have your say

From humble cottages to gargantuan estates, we take a peek inside the homes of some of the most famous Scottish painters and poets.

J M Barrie's home, 9 Brechin Road

Abbotsford House, the home of Sir Walter Scott

Abbotsford House, the home of Sir Walter Scott

In this unassuming house in Kirriemuir, the great Peter Pan creator J.M. Barrie was born on 9th May 1860. He was the ninth of ten children from a weaving family. Today it's preserved as a museum, along with number 11 next door. There's a wash house at the back which was the inspiration for the Wendy House in Peter Pan and where Barrie performed his first play aged seven. An exhibition tells the story of his life and work and you can see the box beds where the Barrie children slept as well as costumes from the first production of Peter Pan.

Barrie had an unhappy childhood and suffered from psychogenic dwarfism. Imagine how small the house must have been for a family with nine children; both the downstairs rooms were used for weaving and there are only two bedrooms upstairs. Kirriemuir also has a statue of Peter Pan.

Sir Walter Scott's home, Abbotsford

Abbotsford House was the pride and joy of poet and novelist Sir Walter Scott. The author of Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of the Lake, was passionate about his home and called it a 'flibbertigibbet of a house'. The literary superstar of his day amassed a huge fortune which he used to design and extend this great house on the banks of the river Tweed.

Robert Burns' Cottage in Alloway. Picture: Geograph

Robert Burns' Cottage in Alloway. Picture: Geograph

Abbotsford is a physical example of the Romantic Movement which Scott helped to create. There's also an exhibition which tells of his enormous success and his debt in later years. He died in the dining room.

Fans of Scott have been visiting Abbotsford since the 1850s and it was featured in early Victorian tour guides. Queen Victoria herself visited in 1867. Since a major refurbishment you now enter through the front door. Highlights of the tour include Scott's study, his library and his green Chinesse drawing room. The books on show form just a part of Scott's collection of 9,000.

Robert Burns' Cottage

Robert Burns was born in this thatched cottage in Alloway in 1759. He lived there until he was seven, side by side with the farm animals. On the walls of the cottage are quotes from his poems and some of his favourite words such as 'crambo-jingle'. Outside is the small farm where he helped his father and brother. In the 19th century the cottage was rented out as accommodation and an alehouse. It was restored to its former glory by the Alloway Burns Monument Trust in 1881.

Broughton House, the home of A E Hornel. Picture: Wikimedia

Broughton House, the home of A E Hornel. Picture: Wikimedia

E A Hornel, Broughton House

Renowned 'Glasgow Boy' artist E A Hornel lived at Broughton House, a large pink Georgian house in Kikcudbright. He bought it in 1901 and made it his studio and home. The house is now a National Trust museum dedicated to his life and work.

The house is full of paintings, photographs and sculpture. You can even see inside Hornel's former studio. There's a stunning Japanese-inspired garden, which he designed with his sister after their tour of the Far East.

The Mackintosh House

The Mackintosh House at The Hunterian is “a meticulous reassemblage” of the interiors of the Glasgow home where Charles Rennie Mackintosh lived with his wife on Florentine Terrace (now Southpark Avenue) from 1906 to 1914. The interiors of the original were decorated in his distinctive style. The original house was demolished in the 1960s but the fixtures and furniture were preserved and reassembled as part of the Hunterian Art Gallery. The sequence of rooms is exactly the same as the original with almost the same views, since Florentine Terrace was only 100 metres away. The interiors were decorated according to contemporary descriptions and photographs of the design and textiles of the original house.