Children take centre stage to mark Year of Young People

(L-R)  Niamh McCrudden (Silver), Millie Kathryn Bonniwell (Gold) and Esme McLeod (Bronze) after competing in the Gaelic poetry recital competition for 7-8 year old learners at this year's Royal National M�d in Dunoon.
(L-R) Niamh McCrudden (Silver), Millie Kathryn Bonniwell (Gold) and Esme McLeod (Bronze) after competing in the Gaelic poetry recital competition for 7-8 year old learners at this year's Royal National M�d in Dunoon.
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Youngsters took centre stage at the Royal National Mòd in Dunoon yesterday with the first full day of competition in the children’s categories.

Gaelic reading and singing sessions were held with BBC Alba’s Linda MacLeod, and the annual Children’s Ceilidh encouraged young people to join in the fun.

The children’s competitions are set to continue today with the coveted Traditional and Prescribed Singing Silver Medals awarded ahead of the adult competitions beginning tomorrow.

The Mòd will conclude on Saturday with a procession of choirs and pipers making their way through Dunoon towards Queen’s Hall, where a massed choir finale will close the annual celebration of Gaelic culture in style.

John Morrison, chief executive of An Comunn Gàidhealach, said: “With this year’s Mòd Celebrations focusing on the Year of Young People, it is great to see so many young Gaels investing in the language and engaging with the culture and community.

“We’ve had an exciting start to this year’s Mòd with the ­Fiddler’s Rally welcoming international guests, and we are looking forward to witnessing the fantastic talent showcasing at the children’s competitions.

“Special thanks to Dunoon and the local community for making us feel so welcome.”

Pàdruig Morrison of An Comunn Gàidhealach’s Young Persons Committee, said: “I think it’s really important that young people’s views have been used in the planning for this year’s Mòd and it’s pertinent as part of the Year of Young People.

“I think there is definitely an important role in having young people continually engaged in future Mòds, and in a broader sense for the language. The Mòd has always been very important for producing a standard of language and a really great environment for fostering Gaelic use.

“The fringe is also a vitally important part of the Mòd as it creates a great environment for the younger generation to use the language in a fun and sociable way.”