{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"world","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/hong-kong-pro-democracy-campaigners-must-beware-ghost-of-tiananmen-square-kenny-macaskill-1-5049667","id":"1.5049667","articleHeadline": "Hong Kong pro-democracy campaigners must beware ghost of Tiananmen Square – Kenny MacAskill","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574336400000 ,"articleLead": "

Democracy campaigners in Hong Kong need to realise they are unlikely to get significant international help and know when to push and when to back off, writes Kenny MacAskill.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5049666.1574270794!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Unwell and injured protesters leave the Hong Kong Poytechnic University after clashes between pro-democracy campaigners and police (Picture: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

Pulling on a T-shirt last week, I noted it was from my trip to Hong Kong in 2016 and it brought back fond memories. The great natural harbour and the huge urban expanse surrounding it provide one of the great vistas of the world. But what a troubled land.

Reading a piece from the Brookings Institute compounded my pessimism. That institution is one I admire, being both hugely well informed and politically non partisan. The author expressed natural sympathy for those seeking democracy but counselled caution. Whimsically quoting the Kenny Rogers’ song “The Gambler” he wrote you’ve “got to know when to hold them and know when to fold them”.

And he’s right. Politics is the art of the possible and there’s only so far you can go with China as it’s presently constituted.

They’re willing to allow some leeway in a highly centralised state but there are limits.

I was also minded of going around the Solidarity Museum in Gdansk a few weeks back, even though it’s on a different continent. Lech Walesa and his colleagues were heroic. But it was hard to think of an alternative in the early 1980s to General Jaruelska. That was in the days of the Soviet Union before Mikhail Gorbachev. Glasnost hadn’t been heard of and the spectre of invasion, as in Hungary and Czechoslovakia, loomed. In Hong Kong, it’s the ghost of Tiananmen Square that looms. Trump doesn’t care and the West isn’t going to intervene. Time needs bought until change can come. In the interim, don’t risk it all.

READ MORE: Scottish students told to return home from Hong Kong amid increased civil unrest

READ MORE: Brexit: UK may be divided, but we are united by this one key thing – leader comment

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5049666.1574270794!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5049666.1574270794!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Unwell and injured protesters leave the Hong Kong Poytechnic University after clashes between pro-democracy campaigners and police (Picture: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Unwell and injured protesters leave the Hong Kong Poytechnic University after clashes between pro-democracy campaigners and police (Picture: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5049666.1574270794!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/uk-consulate-worker-held-in-china-says-he-was-tortured-1-5049819","id":"1.5049819","articleHeadline": "UK consulate worker held in China says he was tortured","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574325514000 ,"articleLead": "

A former employee of the British Consulate in Hong Kong says he was detained and tortured by Chinese secret police trying to extract information about massive anti-government protests in the territory.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5049818.1574325509!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Simon Cheng's job was to promote Chinese investment in Scotland. Picture: BBC"} ,"articleBody": "

Simon Cheng, whose job was promoting Chinese investment in Scotland, said in an online statement and media interviews that he was hooded, beaten, deprived of sleep and chained to an X-shaped frame by plainclothes and uniformed agents as they sought information on activists involved in the protests and the role they believed Britain played in the demonstrations.

British Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab summoned the Chinese ambassador in London in protest.

“I summoned the Chinese Ambassador to express our outrage at the brutal and disgraceful treatment of Simon in violation of China’s international obligations,” Raab said in a statement. “I have made clear we expect the Chinese authorities to investigate and hold those responsible to account.”

Chinese police in August announced Mr Cheng’s release after 15 days of administrative detention but gave no details of the reasons behind his detention.

China’s foreign ministry responded angrily to the allegations and the summoning of the ambassador at a daily briefing yesterday.

Ambassador Liu Xiaoming will “by no means accept the so-called concerns or complaints raised by the British side,” said ministry spokesman Geng Shuang.

In his account on Facebook, Mr Cheng wrote that he had been asked about whether Britain was promoting pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, and his own involvement in them.

He wrote that while being held he was shuttled between detention and interrogation centres while hooded and handcuffed. In addition to being shackled to the frame, he wrote he was ordered to assume stress positions for “countless hours”, and was beaten with what felt like “sharpened batons” and poked in the knee if he faltered. He was also punished for dozing off during the sessions by being forced to sing the Chinese national anthem.

“I was blindfolded and hooded during the whole torture and interrogations, I sweated a lot, and felt exhausted, dizzy and suffocated,” Mr Cheng wrote.

Mr Cheng no longer works at the consulate and has fled to a third country. Mr Raab said the UK is working to support him, including a possible move to Britain.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5049818.1574325509!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5049818.1574325509!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Simon Cheng's job was to promote Chinese investment in Scotland. Picture: BBC","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Simon Cheng's job was to promote Chinese investment in Scotland. Picture: BBC","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5049818.1574325509!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/woman-in-australia-walked-into-a-wildfire-to-save-a-badly-burnt-koala-1-5049450","id":"1.5049450","articleHeadline": "Woman in Australia walked into a wildfire to save a badly burnt koala","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574260337000 ,"articleLead": "

A woman in Australia walked into a wildfire to save a badly burnt koala.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5049449.1574260333!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The koala named Lewis was given water and wrapped in a blanket after being found on a road in the New South Wales state town of Wauchope."} ,"articleBody": "

The koala named Lewis was given water and wrapped in a blanket after being found on a road in the New South Wales state town of Wauchope.

Rescuer Toni Doherty told Network Nine it was her \"natural instinct\" to rescue the koala from the fire.

She said she \"immediately thought just get to him, put the fire out\".

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The 14-year-old animal was taken to the nearby Port Macquarie Koala Hospital for treatment for severe burns to his feet, chest and stomach.

The hospital commented on its Facebook page: \"She (Ms Doherty) is an absolute legend for capturing this male koala who was so disorientated by the flames and unfortunately was burnt further as he headed back into active fire.

\"He has been treated and is now in the five-star accommodation at the Koala Hospital.\"

Wildfires in South Australia and New South Wales have prompted fire officials to issue emergency warnings.

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Claire McKim"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5049449.1574260333!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5049449.1574260333!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The koala named Lewis was given water and wrapped in a blanket after being found on a road in the New South Wales state town of Wauchope.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The koala named Lewis was given water and wrapped in a blanket after being found on a road in the New South Wales state town of Wauchope.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5049449.1574260333!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/influence-can-help-you-join-the-ranks-of-the-instafamous-caoilfhionn-rose-maguire-1-5048830","id":"1.5048830","articleHeadline": "#influence can help you join the ranks of the InstaFamous – Caoilfhionn Rose Maguire","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574229679000 ,"articleLead": "

Caoilfhionn Rose Maguire tells how she built up her online brand and the doors that it has opened

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048828.1574179274!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The influential InstaFamous can gather thousands of online followers, who look to them as role models for insight and advice on fashion, lifestyle, travel and much more , to their personal online brands. Picture: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

In 2018, 93 per cent of brands used Instagram as their ­channel of choice to launch influencer marketing campaigns according to research conducted by CreatorIQ. So, how did this social media platform become a marketing powerhouse in the hands of the ­everyday consumer?

I was recently invited to host YOTEL Edinburgh’s upcoming YO-TELLs event around the rise of the InstaFamous in Scotland and it got me ­thinking about my own relationship with the social platform.

It all began when I embarked on travels to Thailand with my friend from university. Instagram provided the perfect platform to document my trip in a visual form while ­keeping my friends and family up to date back home.

Back then my photographs were grainy, taken without any consideration for technique or that I was in fact ‘creating content’. I had no clue about hashtags and my captions were very cryptic.

Now, Instagram has become an ­all-consuming world of personal branding, content planning and connections with a global network of online friends.

But when did my relationship with Instagram change? I remember being recognised for my ­Instagram ‘influence’ when I had built up to around 8,500 followers. I was living in London at the time and I was invited to an event at Esteé Lauder HQ – at that point, I thought it couldn’t get much better.

As my following continued to grow, more opportunities came my way. I became a part of the InstaFamous world, a role model for my followers who looked to me for advice on ­everything, from travel and fashion to how to start a side-hustle, and with that comes a feeling of responsibility.

Being an ‘influencer’ soon became part of my livelihood, producing content for brands from Topshop to Bumble. Alongside this, I had a multi-hyphenate approach to my career and I built my travel business, Crusoe Collective, taking on the role as a travel writer for magazine House of Coco. This transient way of working allowed me to grasp opportunities and become more flexible in how I managed both my career and my online presence.

My Instagram channel has now developed into my personal brand, a platform where I focus on curating the perfect feed and producing ­captivating content. If a post doesn’t perform well, it’s deleted, and I go back to the drawing board. Much like a business, if a product isn’t in demand, stop the conveyer belt!

However, more recently, there’s been a shift towards authenticity on the platform – people want to see real people and their real lives.

Hashtags like #reallifeaesthetic and #authenticitymatters are some of the highest trending on the platform and you’re likely to garner more engagement for just being you, rather than a polished version of yourself. In a world that’s never been more ­connected, consumers yearn for a more personal connection and that’s the reason influencer marketing has skyrocketed.

Consumers become attached to their favourite influencers, as do I. If Eatinburgh tells me that a ­certain ­restaurant in Edinburgh is delicious, you bet I’ll go, and if Wear What Works posts about the latest garments to drop on ASOS, you’ll find me filling my cart.

I’m interested to know how others feel about the ever-developing platform which is why I’m excited for this week’s event. Alongside me, YOTEL has brought together some of the most influential and interesting people on the influencer scene in Edinburgh. We’re going to explore the platform in depth, from retaining our following to producing engaging content and managing it all with a full-time job on the side.

Although my relationship with Instagram has changed over the years, it’s helped me build my career and connect with like-minded people. I owe a lot to Instagram but my success is also down to always maintaining a side-hustle to the point of self-employment, my loyal followers and the hard work I’ve put in to build my brand to where it is today.

For now, it seems, the influencer marketing scene will continue to grow, redefining not only the marketing industry but the world of celebrity and the way consumers shop.

YO-TELLs InstaFamous will take place on 21 November at 7pm at YOTEL Edinburgh. Opened in August, this is the tech-inspired group’s first UK city centre hotel. The 276-room hotel offers an experience driven by sleek minimalistic design and clever use of technology for those who appreciate quality but don’t need the fuss of a traditional luxury hotel.

Caoilfhionn Rose Maguire, YOTEL.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Caoilfhionn Rose Maguire"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048828.1574179274!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048828.1574179274!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The influential InstaFamous can gather thousands of online followers, who look to them as role models for insight and advice on fashion, lifestyle, travel and much more , to their personal online brands. Picture: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The influential InstaFamous can gather thousands of online followers, who look to them as role models for insight and advice on fashion, lifestyle, travel and much more , to their personal online brands. Picture: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048828.1574179274!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048829.1574179276!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048829.1574179276!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Caoilfhionn Rose Maguire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Caoilfhionn Rose Maguire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048829.1574179276!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/two-officers-responsible-for-guarding-jeffrey-epstein-charged-with-falsifying-prison-records-1-5048909","id":"1.5048909","articleHeadline": "Two officers responsible for guarding Jeffrey Epstein charged with falsifying prison records","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574182046000 ,"articleLead": "

Two correctional officers responsible for guarding Jeffrey Epstein the night he killed himself have been charged with falsifying prison records.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048907.1574182041!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Epstein's death while awaiting trial on charges he sexually abused underage girls was a major embarrassment for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons"} ,"articleBody": "

A US grand jury indictment made public on Tuesday accused guards Toval Noel and Michael Thomas of neglecting their duties by failing to perform checks on Epstein every half hour, as required, and of fabricating log entries to show they had.

The charges against the officers are the first in connection with the wealthy financier's death in August at the Metropolitan Correctional Center in New York. The city's medical examiner ruled Epstein's death a suicide..

• READ MORE: Prince Andrew likely to be sidelined after car-crash Epstein interview
Epstein's death while awaiting trial on charges he sexually abused underage girls was a major embarrassment for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons.

The cell where he died was in a high-security unit, famous for having held terrorists and drug cartel kingpins. Epstein's death, though, revealed the jail was suffering from problems including chronic staffing shortages that lead to mandatory overtime for guards day after day and other staff being pressed into service as correctional officers.

Attorney General William Barr has said investigators found \"serious irregularities\" at the jail and the FBI's investigation had been slowed because some witnesses were uncooperative.

Epstein had been placed on suicide watch after he was found July 23 on the floor of his cell with a bruised neck. Multiple people familiar with operations at the jail say Epstein was taken off the watch after about a week, meaning he was less closely monitored but still supposed to be checked on every 30 minutes.

• READ MORE: Jeffrey Epstein accuser says Prince Andrew ‘knows the truth’ about sex claims
Investigators believe those checks weren't done for several hours before Epstein was discovered in his cell with a bedsheet around his neck, another person - who wished not to be named - familiar with the matter reported to the Associated Press.

Federal prosecutors had subpoenaed up to 20 staff members at the jail in August. The case was a top priority for the Justice Department. Both Barr and Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen received regular updates. Falsification of records has been a problem throughout the federal prison system.

Epstein's death ended the possibility of a trial that would have involved prominent figures and sparked widespread anger that he wouldn't have to answer for the allegations.

He had pleaded not guilty and was preparing to argue that he could not be charged because of a 2008 deal he made to avoid federal prosecution on similar allegations.

Epstein's death prompted a whirl of conspiracy theories from people, including members of Epstein's family and some of his alleged victims, who questioned whether it was possible that he'd killed himself in such a high-security setting. Officials have said there is no basis for those suspicions.

" ,"byline": {"email": "sean.murphy@jpimedia.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048907.1574182041!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048907.1574182041!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Epstein's death while awaiting trial on charges he sexually abused underage girls was a major embarrassment for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Epstein's death while awaiting trial on charges he sexually abused underage girls was a major embarrassment for the U.S. Bureau of Prisons","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048907.1574182041!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/sweden-drops-investigation-into-an-alleged-rape-by-wikileaks-founder-julian-assange-1-5048608","id":"1.5048608","articleHeadline": "Sweden drops investigation into an alleged rape by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574170570000 ,"articleLead": "

Sweden has dropped a preliminary investigation into an alleged rape by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048607.1574170566!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sweden has dropped a preliminary investigation into an alleged rape by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange."} ,"articleBody": "

The alleged rape investigation involving Assange, who is currently in prison in Britain, has been discontinued, a Swedish prosecutor said Tuesday.

\"I want to inform about my decision to discontinue the preliminary investigation,\" Deputy Chief Prosecutor Eva-Marie Persson told a news conference.

Kristinn Hrafnsson, WikiLeaks editor-in-chief, said in a tweet that the focus should now move onto the \"threat\" that Assange has been \"warning about for years: the belligerent prosecution of the United States and the threat it poses to the First Amendment.\"

Tuesday's decision follows a ruling in June by a Swedish court that Assange should not be detained.

Two months earlier, Assange was evicted from the Ecuador Embassy in London where he had been holed up since 2012. He was immediately arrested and is currently serving a 50-week sentence in Britain for jumping bail in 2012.

He is also fighting extradition to the U.S., which accuses him of publishing secret documents.

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" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048607.1574170566!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048607.1574170566!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Sweden has dropped a preliminary investigation into an alleged rape by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sweden has dropped a preliminary investigation into an alleged rape by WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048607.1574170566!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/health/humble-bowl-of-soup-could-help-to-combat-malaria-say-scientists-1-5048332","id":"1.5048332","articleHeadline": "Humble bowl of soup could help to combat malaria say scientists","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574163602000 ,"articleLead": "

The answer to tackling the worldwide scourge of malaria could lie in the humble bowl of soup, scientists say.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048331.1574113214!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "For hundreds of years, a homemade bowl of nourishing broth has been used to fuel people battling the effects of flu and fever. Picture: Shutterstock"} ,"articleBody": "

For hundreds of years, a homemade bowl of nourishing broth has been used to fuel people battling the effects of flu and fever.

Now UK scientists have shown some traditional vegetable and meat broths can prove more than a match for one of the deadliest malarial parasites in the world.

They were shown to interrupt the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum, which causes 99 per cent of deaths from malaria and is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito.

Half the world’s population is vulnerable to malaria, and resistance to the drugs used to treat it continues to emerge.

The researchers were prompted to investigate whether there were any further natural remedies after the discovery of the antimalarial artemesin, which originates from qinghao, used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine to treat fever.

They asked pupils from Eden Primary School in London to bring in samples of homemade soup broths made using family recipes passed down through generations. Their ethnic backgrounds ranged from across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East.

They incubated extracts from 56 broths for three days with different cultures of Plasmodium falciparum to see if any could stop the growth of the sexually immature parasites. They also assessed whether the samples could block sexual maturation – the stage at which the parasite can infect the mosquito.

Many samples were found to increase the rate of parasite growth.

But five of the broths curbed growth by more than 50 per cent, with two of them as effective as a leading antimalarial drug, dihydroartemisinin. Four others were more than 50 per cent effective at blocking sexual maturation, so potentially stopping malarial transmission.

The authors, from Imperial College London and Great Ormond Street Hospital, said: “This journey, mirroring that of artemisinin from the qinghao herb, may as yet reveal another source of potent anti-infective treatment.”

The active ingredients in the broths studied are yet to be identified and tested in clinical trials, caution the researchers.

They added: “At a time when there is a resurgent voice against evidence-based medicine, such exercises have great importance for educating the next generation about how new drugs are discovered, how they might work and how untapped resources still exist in the fight against global diseases of significance.”

The findings are published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048331.1574113214!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048331.1574113214!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "For hundreds of years, a homemade bowl of nourishing broth has been used to fuel people battling the effects of flu and fever. Picture: Shutterstock","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "For hundreds of years, a homemade bowl of nourishing broth has been used to fuel people battling the effects of flu and fever. Picture: Shutterstock","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048331.1574113214!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/this-is-how-much-kylie-jenner-sold-the-majority-stake-in-her-cosmetics-business-for-1-5048406","id":"1.5048406","articleHeadline": "This is how much Kylie Jenner sold the majority stake in her cosmetics business for","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574156836000 ,"articleLead": "

Kylie Jenner has sold a majority stake in her cosmetics business for 600 million US dollars, about £463 million.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048405.1574156831!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The 22-year-old sold 51% of Kylie Cosmetics to makeup and fragrance giant Coty Inc, in a deal which values the company at about 1.2 billion US dollars (926 million)."} ,"articleBody": "

The 22-year-old sold 51% of Kylie Cosmetics to makeup and fragrance giant Coty Inc, in a deal which values the company at about 1.2 billion US dollars (£926 million).

Jenner was still still a teenager when she launched the business in 2015 as a line of lip kits.

According to Coty, which also owns brands including Max Factor, Rimmel and Clairol, the deal will see Jenner \"lead all creative efforts in terms of product and communications initiatives\".

Coty cited Jenner's more than 270 million social media followers across her personal and business accounts , saying she is \"one of the most influential voices among beauty consumers globally\".

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Jenner, who appears alongside her family on reality TV show Keeping Up With The Kardashians, said: \"I'm excited to partner with Coty to continue to reach even more fans of Kylie Cosmetics and Kylie Skin around the world.

\"I look forward to continuing the creativity and ingenuity for each collection that consumers have come to expect and engaging with my fans across social media.

\"This partnership will allow me and my team to stay focused on the creation and development of each product while building the brand into an international beauty powerhouse.\"

The move solidifies Jenner's reputation as one of the youngest billionaires in the world.

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048405.1574156831!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048405.1574156831!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The 22-year-old sold 51% of Kylie Cosmetics to makeup and fragrance giant Coty Inc, in a deal which values the company at about 1.2 billion US dollars (926 million).","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The 22-year-old sold 51% of Kylie Cosmetics to makeup and fragrance giant Coty Inc, in a deal which values the company at about 1.2 billion US dollars (926 million).","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048405.1574156831!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/people/prince-andrew-likely-to-be-sidelined-after-car-crash-epstein-interview-1-5048336","id":"1.5048336","articleHeadline": "Prince Andrew likely to be sidelined after car-crash Epstein interview","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574150780000 ,"articleLead": "

The Duke of York faces being eased out of his role as a working royal following his calamitous television interview over his links to sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048335.1574150775!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Calls for duke to give a formal statement to US investigators. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

A royal source said Prince Andrew’s disastrous performance had made it “somewhat more likely” that he will be sidelined as a frontline member of the royal family once his brother accedes to the throne.

As the interview continued to generate headlines, the duke, who had hoped his Newsnight appearance would draw a line under the controversy about his decade-long friendship with Epstein, was said yesterday to have told friends that he regretted not expressing sympathy for the financier’s victims.

READ MORE: Prince Andrew: ‘I’ve let my family down’

The widespread criticism of the duke’s “excruciating” attempted defence and the subsequent demands from US lawyers representing Epstein’s victims that he now give evidence under oath have given added impetus to suggestions that Prince Andrew will find himself with a lower profile in the coming years. The duke has in recent years sought to carve out a role as a champion of business with his Pitch@Palace scheme to encourage young entrepreneurs.

But the enlivened controversy over Epstein now threatens to overshadow Prince Andrew’s projects.

It emerged last night that the accountancy giant KPMG has decided not to renew its sponsorship of the Pitch@Palace scheme. Buckingham Palace said the contract had ended last month.

Prince Charles, who is said to have considered the BBC interview as “misguided”, is widely believed to have clashed in the past with his brother over the public role of his family and was already planning a wide-ranging review of the system of working royals.

One senior source said: “There is a feeling that the events of the weekend make it somewhat more likely that the Prince of Wales will decide that his plans for a slimmed down monarchy once he succeeds [to the throne] don’t encompass the Duke of York.

“It is not a move that the Queen would be likely to make. But it is no secret that the duke has wanted a higher profile for his family.

“The Newsnight interview has certainly put that process in reverse, perhaps terminally.”

The apparent desire of Prince Andrew to chart his own PR course, alongside the Duke of Sussex’s decision last month to publicly confront parts of the tabloid press over its coverage of his wife, prompted the BBC’s royal correspondent, Nicholas Witchell, to suggest that the Queen no longer has “strong central control” of the Windsor clan. Mr Witchell said: “The Queen was informed but she is 93 years old now, and she is not exercising the strong control she had, if she ever did. There is now a lack of strong central control. We have had two episodes within just a couple of months, of senior members of the royal family doing it their way.”

The extent to which Prince Andrew has failed in his desire for the Newsnight interview to draw a line under what one aide described as “the sniping and the commentary” was underlined yesterday when palace sources were forced to deny a claim from a former Downing Street adviser that the duke used a racially offensive term in a meeting he attended at Buckingham Palace in 2012.

Rohan Silva, a former aide to David Cameron, said the prince had responded to a question about whether the Whitehall department responsible for trade could be doing a better job by saying: “Well, If you’ll pardon the expression, that really is the n***** in the woodpile.”

Palace sources have categorically denied Prince Andrew used the word, saying: “the duke did not say that”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048335.1574150775!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048335.1574150775!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Calls for duke to give a formal statement to US investigators. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Calls for duke to give a formal statement to US investigators. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048335.1574150775!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/education/heriot-watt-university-plans-new-campus-in-dubai-which-will-open-in-2021-1-5048345","id":"1.5048345","articleHeadline": "Heriot-Watt University plans new campus in Dubai which will open in 2021","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574143636000 ,"articleLead": "

A Scottish university has unveiled plans to move its 4,000 students in the United Arab Emirates to a new state-of-the-art campus in Dubai.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048344.1574115486!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Dubai campus brings in income for the university and no money from UK taxpayers is used towards its costs. Picture: Shutterstock"} ,"articleBody": "

Heriot-Watt said that it would open in the site in 2021, and that it would provide “the latest innovations in business education, teaching and research”.

The Dubai campus brings in income for the university and no money from UK taxpayers is used towards its costs.

Professor Richard A Williams, the university’s vice-chancellor, said that the campus played a “vital part in the financial sustainability of the university and is a major part of our future”.

He said: “Our Dubai campus already plays a vital part in the financial sustainability of the university and is a major part of our future through our globally-integrated Strategy 2025.

“This includes our vision to build on our reputation as a leading higher education institution in the Middle East, creating a centre for excellence in both teaching and research, which is renowned for the value and impact of our contribution to the local economy and society.”

Heriot-Watt first launched its Dubai campus in 2005. Earlier this year, the university received a prestigious five-star ranking from the Knowledge and Human Development Authority (KHDA), the body responsible for the quality of private education in Dubai. It also currently holds the title, Best University in the Middle East, awarded by Forbes.

News of the relocation has been welcomed by the Scottish Government’s minister for further education, higher education and science Richard Lochhead.

Mr Lochhead said: “This project is hugely ambitious, and a wonderful example of how Scotland continues to punch above its weight in terms of research, innovation and academic strength.

“I applaud Heriot-Watt for its vision to continue expanding what it offers to even more people and places – yet another demonstration to the world that Scotland is an open, welcoming and inclusive nation.”

Staff and students will move to the new campus in the same year Heriot-Watt celebrates its founding bicentenary.

Students are set to benefit from an enhanced library and a range of digitally enhanced classrooms, seminar rooms, studios, and laboratories.

The university’s in-house recording studios will allow the creation of high-quality digital material and the central location of the new campus in the Dubai Knowledge Park means more opportunities for students to engage directly with business and industry.

Mohammad Abdullah, managing director of Dubai Knowledge Park, said: “This partnership, which is in line with the UAE’s growing knowledge economy, is an important addition to Dubai’s robust academic scene.

“By supporting our partners within our vibrant education community, we enable them to offer world-class academic programmes. We value our longstanding partnership with the university and their investment in developing talent.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048344.1574115486!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048344.1574115486!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The Dubai campus brings in income for the university and no money from UK taxpayers is used towards its costs. Picture: Shutterstock","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Dubai campus brings in income for the university and no money from UK taxpayers is used towards its costs. Picture: Shutterstock","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048344.1574115486!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/health/scientists-pioneer-bid-to-curb-deadly-rabies-1-5048347","id":"1.5048347","articleHeadline": "Scientists pioneer bid to curb deadly rabies","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574143216000 ,"articleLead": "

Scottish scientists have pioneered a new technique to help stop the spread of deadly rabies from infected bats to humans.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048346.1574115433!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The technology could be used to stop the spread of deadly rabies by bats without killing them."} ,"articleBody": "

Researchers from the University of Glasgow used “glowing” fluorescent gel to estimate the potential effectiveness of spreadable vaccines to control diseases in wild bats in South America.

Rabies vaccines given to bats can be transferred from one bat to another – however how widely they were spread was not previously known.

The fluorescent gel – called Rhodamine b – was applied to bats in three colonies in Peru, where it acted as a marker to simulate the bat-to-bat spread of an oral rabies vaccine.

When the gel was ingested by bats that groomed each other, it led to fluorescence in the bats’ hair follicles, which was then monitored by fluorescent microscopic analysis of hair samples collected by the scientists.

Where common vampire bats routinely feed on human blood, rabies is estimated to cause up to 960 deaths in every 100,000 people, while losses from livestock mortality exceed £38.61 million annually, disproportionately affecting impoverished, rural communities.

Dr Daniel Streicker, senior research fellow at the University of Glasgow’s Institute of Biodiversity, Animal Health and Comparative Medicine and the MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, said: “Vampire bat rabies still has severe medical and agricultural impacts across North, Central and South America despite decades of efforts to mitigate its burden.

“Our findings demonstrated that bat-to-bat transfer oral rabies vaccines could increase population-level immunity up to 2.6 times beyond the same effort using conventional, non-spreadable vaccines.

“Our findings reveal the exciting potential for using a new generation of spreadable vaccine technologies to protect human and animal health by fighting diseases within their wildlife hosts.”

The scientists used mathematical models to demonstrate that observed levels of vaccine transfer would reduce the probability, size and duration of rabies outbreaks, even at low, but realistically achievable levels of vaccine deployment. Models further showed that spreadable vaccine would control rabies more effectively than the current policy of killing the bats.

Co-researcher Kevin Bakker said: “Because rabies relies on vampire bat movement between colonies, a strategic switch from poisoning to vaccination would increase immunity and may lead to a dramatic reduction in rabies across Latin America.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048346.1574115433!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048346.1574115433!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The technology could be used to stop the spread of deadly rabies by bats without killing them.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The technology could be used to stop the spread of deadly rabies by bats without killing them.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048346.1574115433!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/general-election-how-boris-johnson-will-turn-uk-into-a-us-vassal-state-henry-mcleish-1-5047914","id":"1.5047914","articleHeadline": "General election: How Boris Johnson will turn UK into a US vassal state – Henry McLeish","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574143200000 ,"articleLead": "

Boris Johnson has failed to come clear about private talks between his Government and US pharmaceutical companies amid fears a US-UK trade deal with inflate the cost of drugs for the NHS, writes Henry McLeish.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047913.1574085324!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump and Boris Johnson speak before a working breakfast at the August G7 Summit (Picture: Erin Schaff/AFP/Getty)"} ,"articleBody": "

The US is playing a much bigger role in our general election than most people think, but Boris Johnson is keen to play down what could end up as a further humiliation for the UK, after the EU referendum. Our Prime Minister is already a populist but why is he so keen to be in the pocket of President Trump?

Surprising? By anointing Johnson as his protégé, urging the PM to team up with Nigel Farage for an “invincible political partnership” – now a reality in their Brexit pact – welcoming the idea of Britain’s post-Brexit future being closely linked to the US and encouraging the myth that a “super charged” UK-US trade deal is imminent, then distorting what that trade deal might look like, Trump, like Putin, is interfering in our election.

The President sees the UK as resembling the 51st state of the US or some overseas territory. Borrowing from Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg, Trump sees the UK as a “vassal state” with little negotiating strength or leverage and increasingly vulnerable outside the EU.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon warns Brexit will hit Scotland’s north-east hardest

READ MORE: Brexit Britain must realise it cannot stand alone in 21st century world – Alastair Stewart

But many right-wing Conservative MPs, including those in the European Research Group, the ‘Britain Unchained’ warriors, most of whom are now in Johnson’s Cabinet, and the “Singapore on Thames” free-market devotees, are excited at the prospect of leaning towards America.

For this group of questionable patriots, leaving the EU was only the first, and most important, step in the transformation of Britain into a more complete free-market economy. In the EU referendum in 2016, the British people were never informed that “winning” our country back meant selling out to an unpredictable US and an unhinged President.

Johnson keeps refusing to explain

The Americanisation of the UK is not an antidote to Brexit, or a compensation for this unique act of national self-harm. Over the next few weeks, voters have to decide, whether or not Johnson is deliberately obscuring his naive and unquestioning pro-US agenda and over-selling the prospects of a speedy trade deal.

Johnson has refused to publish the parliamentary report into Russian meddling in Brexit; to divulge details of private talks between his Government and US pharmaceutical giants; to come clean on any trade deal and its likely timescale; to explain why Liz Truss, Trade Secretary has been in the US receiving advice from right-wing think tanks on weakening UK regulations for industry; to tell the truth about the NHS being part of the trade negotiations with the US; and to explain the difference between the wildly optimistic views of the PM and the right-leaning press, predicting a deal by the end of 2020, and the harsh reality that a US-UK deal is likely to take three to five years minimum and possibly much longer with no guarantee there will even be a deal! This is the overwhelming view of the timetable in the US.

Setting aside the political affinity between the Conservative party and the Republican party – earlier in the summer 46 Republican senators signed a joint letter to Theresa May offering support – the US is not warming to trade talks.

Johnson should come clean. The US is being asked to come to the rescue of a lesser UK, after Brexit, with no real evidence justifying this approach. Johnson’s desperate attempts to fix this trade deal is leading the UK down a very dangerous and dishonest path.

Trump wants a no-deal Brexit

In the US, there is a feeling that the UK has been significantly weakened as the details of our post-Brexit future unfold. It is worth noting that apart from the nostalgia and the history of this ‘special relationship”, the US has little reason to be generous. The US enjoys a trade surplus on goods and services with the UK and there is no pressing need for them to get excited.

Johnson’s EU withdrawal deal has annoyed Trump. He has said that any lingering ties with the EU would prevent a trade deal. Trump wants a no-deal Brexit, illustrating his opposition to the EU and the prospect of an even more vulnerable Britain. Depending on the outcome of this election, electors could be faced with a no-deal Brexit and no US trade deal.

Agriculture and prescription drugs would be the markets of most benefit to the US. If the US gets what it wants, agriculture would be under severe pressure from lower animal welfare and food standards and the NHS would see dramatic price increases in medicines and pharmaceutical products. This would be a sell out, not a trade deal.

Any trade deal would also have to be ratified by the US Congress and again there is no guarantee of an easy passage. In the House of Representatives, Speaker Nancy Pelosi has already set out the Democrats’ position, saying that if there was any undermining of the Good Friday Agreement as part of Brexit, they would oppose any deal.

No brave new world

The fiction about an early trade deal with the US should be a wake-up call in our election. The Government is simply lying about the progress, substance and the timing of any deal. Johnson sees America as his consolation prize after the UK exits the European Union. This is not how it is seen in the US.

Our election should be an opportunity to quiz the Conservatives on what appears to be their only Brexit benefit. Brexit, with or without a US trade deal, will not unlock a brave new world.

Our “special relationship” with the US has served us well, but the resignation of our Ambassador Kim Darroch represents a low point in relations between the two countries and another example of Trump intervening in the politics of another country; unsurprisingly Johnson provided neither support for the Ambassador nor criticism of Trump. At the heart of this election and Brexit, there is an issue of seismic proportions: a UK, lacking direction, confidence, identity, honesty or any idea of a role in the modern world. Dean Acheson, the former US Secretary of State, said in 1962, much to the annoyance of Prime Minister Harold MacMillan, that “Great Britain has lost an Empire and has not yet found a role”.

This is as true today as it was then. Our future lies with the EU. Being dragged along on the coat tails of America is the nightmare scenario. The UK election gives us the opportunity to have the serious debate that we didn’t have in the summer of 2016.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047913.1574085324!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047913.1574085324!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Donald Trump and Boris Johnson speak before a working breakfast at the August G7 Summit (Picture: Erin Schaff/AFP/Getty)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump and Boris Johnson speak before a working breakfast at the August G7 Summit (Picture: Erin Schaff/AFP/Getty)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047913.1574085324!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/brexit-uk-may-be-divided-but-we-are-united-by-this-one-key-thing-leader-comment-1-5048290","id":"1.5048290","articleHeadline": "Brexit: UK may be divided, but we are united by this one key thing – leader comment","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574143200000 ,"articleLead": "

We should remain true to democratic ideals whatever happens about Brexit – Leave or Remain – and respect the views of those who disagree with us.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048289.1574102600!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A pro-democracy protester is detained by riot police in Hong Kong (Picture: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

China’s “one country, two systems” policy in relation to Hong Kong was always doomed to fail. Perhaps its most significant achievement was to provide cover to the UK as it did what it had to do in 1997 – hand back its former colony to China – despite the undemocratic nature of its rulers.

Thirty years on from the Tiananmen Square massacre – an anniversary marked around the world but censored in China – Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement is facing a crackdown by the authorities. One can only hope there is no repeat of the same deathtoll of that bleak day in Beijing in 1989, which is unknown but was claimed to be at least 10,000 according to a declassified British diplomatic cable citing a source close to a member of China’s State Council.

READ MORE: Hong Kong activists mock police warning of ‘terrorist’ violence

READ MORE: Brexit: Talk of ‘traitors’ and ‘Quislings’ is un-Christian – Murdo Fraser

The problem for President Xi Jinping is that the existence of a small democratic enclave is a constant reminder that he has no legitimate right to power because a majority of the people he rules over did not give it to him.

By contrast, the UK is a functioning democracy and this means peaceful protests are not just allowed but facilitated by the authorities. They are not a fundamental challenge to the system, but part of it.

Honouring democracy

And so, as a new poll reveals that 77 per cent of people believe Britain is more divided than ever, we should put our faith in democracy and remain true to its basic values.

Whatever the future holds, from a no-deal Brexit to remaining in the EU, provided the decisions are taken in a democratic fashion, we should all respect them, just as we should have a basic level of respect for the politicians responsible and for ordinary citizens we disagree with.

Some on the Brexit side of the debate believe it would be a betrayal of democracy if the 2016 Brexit referendum result is not “honoured”.

However, democracy is continually expressed, never set in stone, and we are allowed to change our minds if we want to. Even if Brexit takes place, it is possible that people will start campaigning for the UK to rejoin the EU and they would be perfectly entitled to do so.

Protests can turn violent in the UK, forcing the police to respond, at times with batons and riot gear.

But the violence in Hong Kong is different. It is what happens when arguments take place that ultimately have no democratic solution because they are about democracy itself.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5048289.1574102600!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5048289.1574102600!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A pro-democracy protester is detained by riot police in Hong Kong (Picture: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A pro-democracy protester is detained by riot police in Hong Kong (Picture: Anthony Kwan/Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5048289.1574102600!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/why-catalonia-remains-deadlocked-over-independence-1-5047842","id":"1.5047842","articleHeadline": "Why Catalonia remains deadlocked over independence","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574081086000 ,"articleLead": "

As Spanish authorities begin a fresh attempt to extradite Clara Ponsati from Scotland, the independence debate in Catalonia rages on, writes Chris McCall

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047841.1574078084!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Pro-independence supporters demonstrate outside the Spanish consulate in Edinburgh in 2018. Authorities in Madrid later dropped plans to extradite Clara Ponsati but revived them this month. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

Clara Ponsati was last week granted bail by an Edinburgh court after authorities in Madrid began a fresh bid to have the former Catalan minister extradited from Scotland.

The St Andrews University academic - who denies any wrongdoing - is wanted by federal prosecutors in Spain for her involvement in the hugely controversial Catalan independence referendum in 2017.

Ponsati faces a single charge of sedition and will return to court on December 12. Meanwhile, the independence debate continues to rage in Catalonia.

READ MORE: Why Catalonia’s independence vote is ‘very different’ from Scotland’s

“Public opinion in Catalonia has not changed,\" Daniel Cetrà, a research fellow at the University of Edinburgh's Centre on Constitutional Change, told The Scotsman.

\"Support for independence continues to poll at around 45 per cent while support for a negotiated independence referendum polls at 70 per cent.

\"It is remarkable how Catalan public opinion remains similar - despite several momentous events in the past two years including a failed declaration of independence in 2017, direct rule from Madrid during eight months, and the sentencing of Catalan leaders to 9-13 years in jail.

\"The independence movement is not strong enough to force a referendum or a break-up, nor are Spanish leaders able to make offers or create a common project which is appealing enough in Catalonia to settle the issue. Hence the deadlock.\"

Cetrà has closely followed closely both the Scottish and Catalan independence campaigns. Originally from Barcelona, he moved to Scotland to study in 2010.

Differing viewpoints

Public opinion remains split in Spain over how the Madrid authorities have handled the prosecution of several Catalan leaders in the aftermath of the 2017 independence vote.

\"A recent poll showed that almost 50 per cent of Spaniards view the recent trial as 'fair and proportionate' while 22 per cent view it as 'too soft' and only 20 per cent as 'too harsh',\" he added. \"In addition, 67 per cent oppose any form of amnesty or pardon.

\"Public opinion in Catalonia is the exact opposite. Politically, there has been a hardening of positions on Catalonia which was evident in the recent general election campaign. The rise of the far-right Vox is a partial consequence of events in Catalonia, while the Socialists ran an unusually tough campaign on the independence movement and even the leftist Podemos toned down their defense of a referendum in Catalonia.

So what chances are there of a devolved Catalan government ever attempting another independence referendum?

\"Another unilateral referendum is very unlikely indeed,\" continued Cetrà. \"While the independence movement is divided, it is gradually moving towards a more pragmatic road map.

“This movement is led by the ERC, which is the ideological equivalent of the SNP and now the strongest Catalan pro-independence party. There is no social appetite for another unilateral referendum either.

\"It is true that current Catalan president Quim Torra hinted at a new independence referendum a few weeks ago but he lacks the support of the other pro-independence parties, and even of some members of his own party.\"

" ,"byline": {"email": "chris.mccall@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Chris McCall"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047841.1574078084!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047841.1574078084!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Pro-independence supporters demonstrate outside the Spanish consulate in Edinburgh in 2018. Authorities in Madrid later dropped plans to extradite Clara Ponsati but revived them this month. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Pro-independence supporters demonstrate outside the Spanish consulate in Edinburgh in 2018. Authorities in Madrid later dropped plans to extradite Clara Ponsati but revived them this month. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047841.1574078084!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/neighbours-actor-craig-mclachlan-indecently-assaulted-co-star-on-stage-when-he-was-meant-to-merely-simulate-sex-act-1-5047766","id":"1.5047766","articleHeadline": "Neighbours actor Craig McLachlan 'indecently assaulted co-star on stage, when he was meant to merely simulate sex act'","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574073908000 ,"articleLead": "

Australian actor Craig McLachlan indecently assaulted a female co-star during a scene in a stage musical in which he was meant to merely simulate a sex act, a court has heard.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047765.1574073904!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "He denies the accusations by the four women."} ,"articleBody": "

Details of allegations brought by four women against the former star of long-running Australian soap operas Neighbours and Home And Away were aired in Melbourne Magistrates Court at a hearing expected to last three weeks.

McLachlan, 54, is facing multiple charges, including counts of indecent assault, one of attempted indecent assault and others of assault, involving the four complainants who worked with him in a production of The Rocky Horror Show in 2014.

He won Australian theatre's prestigious Helpmann Award for best actor for the role.

He denies the accusations by the four women.

READ MORE - Horrified mother told to 'go away and put son on a diet' by nursery worker

Prosecution lawyer Matt Fisher alleged McLachlan \"went beyond the role he was directed to perform\" in relation to the allegations.

He said McLachlan assaulted one female co-star during the scene in which he was meant to be simulating a sex act, which took place out of sight of the audience.

McLachlan kissed her more than 20 times and had once used his finger to trace the outline of the woman's genitals, Mr Fisher told the court.

\"(The woman) felt as if she was trapped,\" he said.

McLachlan has also been accused of pushing his groin into the stomach area of another woman. He also kissed the woman during a show, without being directed to do so, forcing his tongue into her mouth.

Mr Fisher told the court the woman had allegedly said to McLachlan: \"Don't you ever do that to me again.\"

READ MORE - 'Savage' Lorraine Kelly fumes at Jennifer Arcuri after Piers Morgan interview about Boris Johnson

McLachlan had allegedly replied: \"Don't you dare speak to me like that. You are nothing, I will end you.\"

McLachlan's lawyer Stuart Littlemore will argue some of the alleged incidents did not occur, while others were not indecent.

He said when McLachlan had given a woman an unexpected kiss on stage, he had the \"licence and discretion to ad lib\".

The four alleged victims will give evidence about the incidents in a closed court.

After the women's allegations were published, McLachlan initiated defamation proceedings against Fairfax Media, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and a former co-star. That case has been delayed until after the criminal charges are resolved.

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047765.1574073904!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047765.1574073904!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "He denies the accusations by the four women.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "He denies the accusations by the four women.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047765.1574073904!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/horrified-mother-told-to-go-away-and-put-son-on-a-diet-by-nursery-worker-1-5047719","id":"1.5047719","articleHeadline": "Horrified mother told to 'go away and put son on a diet' by nursery worker","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1574066361000 ,"articleLead": "

A horrified mother has hit back after a nursery worker told her to put her son \"on a diet and go away\".

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047718.1574066356!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The handwritten note was shared on social media. Picture: Facebook"} ,"articleBody": "

American Francesca Easdon said she just wanted to make her five-year-old Kyler \"smile at lunchtime\" after asking his carers tell him \"his mommy loves him\".

But she was shocked after her child handed her a note back with a rude handwritten message.

Her letter had initially read: \"Please tell Kyler that his mommy loves him so much and I’m thinking about him.”

But in response, a worker, who has since been fired, wrote: \"NO! Put him on a diet and GO AWAY!\"

In a public Facebook post, shared hundreds of times, the fuming mother wrote: \"I sent this note in Kyler's lunchbox, thinking that it would make him smile at lunch time.

\"We have been working with Kyler on his eating, he’s extremely picky! I have been introducing new healthy options in his lunchbox and discussed the changes with his school. And for the record, I feel that Kyler is absolutely perfect the way he is, I’m just helping him make healthier choices. Instead of his school being supportive

\"I am disgusted that I put my trust in these people to care for my child and this is what I get in return.”

\"I do everything in my power to build my son up and make him feel good about himself because he is amazing.\"

Staff told a local newspaper that the note was not intended to be shared with the mother and that the worker has since been fired.

READ MORE - Ex-NASA engineer reveals quickest way to defrost windscreens

READ MORE - These 20 areas in Scotland have seen a property price boom

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047718.1574066356!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047718.1574066356!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The handwritten note was shared on social media. Picture: Facebook","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The handwritten note was shared on social media. Picture: Facebook","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047718.1574066356!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047717.1574066357!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047717.1574066357!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "His mother was furious and shared her dismay. Picture: Facebook","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "His mother was furious and shared her dismay. Picture: Facebook","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047717.1574066357!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/heritage/to-the-ends-of-the-earth-scots-brothers-who-ushered-in-era-of-global-flight-1-5047395","id":"1.5047395","articleHeadline": "To the ends of the earth: Scots brothers who ushered in era of global flight","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573974428000 ,"articleLead": "

It was a record-breaking feat of engineering ingenuity and intrepid derring-do that brought the other side of the world that bit closer to home.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047393.1573942161!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Vickers Vimy aircraft. Pictures: Central Press/Hulton/Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

Now, nearly a century after two Scots-Australians flew into the history books with one of the defining achievements of the interwar era, their exploits are being commemorated with a new exhibition.

Next month marks the centenary of brothers Ross and Keith Smith masterminding a gruelling, month-long air journey from London to Darwin.

The siblings, born to Scottish parents and partly educated at a boarding school in Moffat, claimed a prize of more than £5,000 after triumphing in the Great Air Race, a competition set up by Billy Hughes, the then prime minister of Australia.

Their success made headlines the world over, and saw the brothers knighted by King George V.

While their exploits are little known nowadays in Scotland, their adopted homeland is pulling out all the stops to celebrate the centenary of the successful landing on 10 December, 1919.

The State Library of South Australia has devoted a new exhibition to the Smiths, along with their mechanics, Wally Shiers and Jim Bennett, who accompanied them on the crossing in a modified Vickers Vimy bomber.

The Heroes of the Skies exhibition includes a logbook from the flight and notebooks kept by the Smiths, along with their pocket compass.

Geoff Strempel, director of the library, said: “We are proud to be a part of the celebrations of the epic flight centenary. This flight is considered one of the world’s great pioneering aviation feats and the story deserves to be told.”

For admirers of the brothers in Scotland, the renewed focus on their exploits is welcome, especially after a week in which an experimental research flight by Qantas set a world record after flying nonstop from London to Sydney.

The Borders-based historian and archivist, Fraser Simm, is among those who believe the Smiths helped usher in a new age of modernity, noting that their journey came a year after the end of the First World War, and just 16 years after the Wright brothers made the first powered flight.

“There can be no doubt that this, and the other pioneering journeys of 1919, ‘shrunk the world’ – there was no going back into a pre-flight world,” said Simm, the historian of George Heriot’s School in Edinburgh. “A tide of developments in technology, communications and travel was fast sweeping its way into people’s lives.”

Even so, in an era when aircraft technology was rudimentary at best, the challenge faced by the Smiths was formidable. Two others crews perished in their attempts, while another was imprisoned as suspected Bolsheviks in Yugoslavia.

For the brothers, both time-served pilots during the Great War, the 11,123-mile open cockpit flight was fraught with danger, with the freezing conditions torturing their bodies and icing up their goggles.

But they endured, and 28 days after leaving British shores, landed in Darwin on 10 December 1919.

A report in The Scotsman the following day paid them a handsome tribute.

“It is the romantic and the adventurous rather than the scientific or commercial side of Smith’s performance that will chiefly seize the public attention and imagination,” it stated. “A voyage of more than 11,000 miles through the air, on a line that reverses the flow of civilisation and religion from their primal homes in the remote East, appeals to the poetic sense and to the historic memory.”

The Smiths were knighted in 1920, but tragedy struck two years later when Ross and Bennett, his loyal mechanic, were killed while testing a new plane in Surrey.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Martin McLaughlin"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047393.1573942161!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047393.1573942161!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The Vickers Vimy aircraft. Pictures: Central Press/Hulton/Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Vickers Vimy aircraft. Pictures: Central Press/Hulton/Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047393.1573942161!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047394.1573942166!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047394.1573942166!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "From left to right, Sergeant Walter Henry Shiers (Wally Shiers), Lieutenant Keith Macpherson Smith, Captain Sir Ross Macpherson Smith and Sergeant Jim Bennett at Hounslow Heath Aerodrome in London, just before setting off for Darwin in Australia. Picture: Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "From left to right, Sergeant Walter Henry Shiers (Wally Shiers), Lieutenant Keith Macpherson Smith, Captain Sir Ross Macpherson Smith and Sergeant Jim Bennett at Hounslow Heath Aerodrome in London, just before setting off for Darwin in Australia. Picture: Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047394.1573942166!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/health/secrets-of-a-zebrafish-s-heart-shown-in-new-image-1-5047192","id":"1.5047192","articleHeadline": "Secrets of a zebrafish’s heart shown in new image","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573884003000 ,"articleLead": "

A new imaging technique pioneered by Scottish scientists is helping unlock the secrets of the zebrafish’s heart - which could teach us more about how the human organ forms, grows and heals.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047191.1573854491!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Dr Jonathan Taylor has been studying the hearts of zebrafish embryos. Picture: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

Researchers from the Universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh have developed a new method to capture 3D video images of the growing hearts of zebrafish embryos for the first time.

Zebrafish hearts are surprisingly similar to those of humans, making them useful in cardiac research.

The British Heart Foundation (BHF) – one of the funders of the study – hope the new method of visualising zebrafish hearts will provide scientists with valuable new insights into the cellular and subcellular processes which occur during the earliest stages of heart development.

The development of the imaging breakthrough was led by Dr Jonathan Taylor of the University of Glasgow’s School of Physics and Astronomy, working closely with colleagues at the University of Edinburgh’s BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science.

Their novel fluorescence time-lapse imaging technique uses a very thin sheet of laser light to build up images into a full 3D image of the heart layer by layer.

While 3D images of the beating heart had been recorded in the past, there was still more work to be done to turn a 3D freeze-frame of a single point in time into what cardiac researchers really wanted to study: a time-lapse video of the heart growing over a full day.

The new technique also allows researchers to see for the first time individual heart cells growing and dividing in the beating heart in astonishing detail over 24 hours.

Dr Taylor said: “Zebrafish embryos’ hearts beat three times a second, and this constant motion makes them incredibly challenging targets to image accurately in three dimensions.

“By the time you’ve taken an image of one layer of the heart, it has moved on to another part of its cardiac cycle. To add to the challenge, heart cells can be damaged by over-exposure to laser light that is needed for fluorescence imaging”.

To overcome those challenges, the researchers developed a computer programme which uses real time image analysis to control exactly when to fire the lasers for imaging the heart.

Dr Taylor added: “Our microscope uses visible light to ‘watch’ the beating heart of the zebrafish through its transparent skin, allowing our computer programs to know exactly when to selectively fire laser light at the heart to capture specific moments in its cycle. This lets us watch continuously as the heart forms over the course of a whole day, without causing any harm to the fish. It’s pulled back the veil on processes such as cell division within the heart which we just didn’t have any way to visualise before.”

Dr Martin Denvir, of the University of Edinburgh, worked with Dr Taylor to develop the new technique.

He said: “This exciting breakthrough, which brings together state-of-the-art research in physics and engineering at Glasgow and Durham with our heart research here in Edinburgh, has allowed us to see live processes in heart formation which we’ve simply had no way to observe before.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047191.1573854491!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047191.1573854491!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Dr Jonathan Taylor has been studying the hearts of zebrafish embryos. Picture: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Dr Jonathan Taylor has been studying the hearts of zebrafish embryos. Picture: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047191.1573854491!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/rush-to-protect-manuscripts-and-art-treasures-as-new-tidal-surge-hits-venice-1-5047180","id":"1.5047180","articleHeadline": "Rush to protect manuscripts and art treasures as new tidal surge hits Venice","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573852438000 ,"articleLead": "

In a city famously built in a lagoon, residents are used to dealing with flooding. But even by Venice’s standards water has been everywhere it should not be this week.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047179.1573852434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "High tide in Venice peaked at five feet above sea level which prompted the mayor to close St Mark's Square. Picture: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

Exceptionally high tidal waters have surged again yesterday, prompting the mayor to close St Mark’s Square and call for more donations for repairs just three days after the Italian city suffered its worst flooding in 50 years.

The high tide peaked at five feet above sea level just before noon, flooding most of the historic World Heritage city’s centre.

Venice mayor Luigi Brugnaro said the damage is estimated at hundreds of millions of euros and blamed climate change for the “dramatic situation”.

He also called for the speedy completion of the city’s long-delayed Moses flood defence project.

Mr Brugnaro said he was forced to ask police to block off St Mark’s Square, which was covered in knee-high water. Workers in high boots removed the platforms used by the public to cross the famous square without getting wet.

Venice saw its second-worst flooding on record on Tuesday when water levels reached more than six feet above sea level.

That prompted the Italian government to declare a state of emergency on Thursday, approving €20 million to help Venice repair the most urgent damage.

“Venice is the pride of all of Italy,” Mr Brugnaro said. “Venice is everyone’s heritage, unique in the world. Thanks to your help, Venice will shine again.”

Venice, a lagoon city built amid a system of canals, is particularly vulnerable to a combination of rising sea levels due to climate change coupled with the city’s well-documented sinking into the 
mud.

The sea level in Venice is four inches higher than it was 50 years ago, according to the city’s tide office.

More than 50 churches have reported damage from the tides.

Carabinieri officers from the corps’ world-renowned and highly trained squad of art experts were being deployed to map damage to art treasures, a job that is expected to take some time.

The Italian Space Agency said it was studying radar data from satellites to detect any signs that bell towers may have shifted or that their foundations might have weakened as they were buffeted by the fast-rising waters.

Many people were rising to the challenge of saving Venice’s many treasures.

University students in Venice rushed to libraries and other institutions filled with books and manuscripts to help shift the material to higher 
levels.

The Italian Society of Authors and Editors, which said Venice’s book stores and libraries were “gravely damaged” by the high water, launched a fundraising campaign. Pitching for donations from Italy and abroad, the group said it was important to “take the side of those who every day are on the front lines for the defence of Italian culture”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5047179.1573852434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5047179.1573852434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "High tide in Venice peaked at five feet above sea level which prompted the mayor to close St Mark's Square. Picture: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "High tide in Venice peaked at five feet above sea level which prompted the mayor to close St Mark's Square. Picture: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5047179.1573852434!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/people/man-proposes-while-surfing-but-loses-engagement-ring-in-the-sea-1-5046816","id":"1.5046816","articleHeadline": "Man proposes while surfing but loses engagement ring in the sea","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573836346000 ,"articleLead": "

A man took a novel approach to proposing to his extreme sport loving girlfriend, by asking her to marry him while the pair were surfing in Hawaii.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046814.1573829658!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Chris kneels on his board before revealing the ring to Lauren."} ,"articleBody": "

Chris Garth surprised now-fiancee Lauren Oiye with the ring while the couple were catching a wave at Queens in Waikiki, where they first met while surfing several years before.

And, while several photographers nearby captured the moment, Lauren said yes, just as Chris dropped the ring.

Luckily, according to Hawaii News Now, Chris was prepared in case this happened and revealed it was a prop ring and that he had the real one waiting safely on the shore.

" ,"byline": {"email": "sean.murphy@jpimedia.co.uk" ,"author": "Sean Murphy"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5046814.1573829658!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046814.1573829658!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Chris kneels on his board before revealing the ring to Lauren.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Chris kneels on his board before revealing the ring to Lauren.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5046814.1573829658!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5046815.1573829659!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046815.1573829659!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The couple celebrate after.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The couple celebrate after.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5046815.1573829659!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/why-sedition-has-no-place-in-a-mature-democracy-top-leader-1-5046376","id":"1.5046376","articleHeadline": "Why ‘sedition’ has no place in a mature democracy – top leader","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573797600000 ,"articleLead": "

Spain’s attempt to extradite Catalan independence campaigner Clara Ponsati on a charge of sedition raises profound questions

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5045618.1573756899!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Former Catalan Minister Clara Ponsati. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

Thomas Paine, author of the Rights of Man, lived to the age of 72, an impressive achievement, given the efforts of two world leaders of his time, William Pitt and the infamous Maximilien Robespierre, to secure his execution. Even George Washington, despite Paine’s role in the American Revolution, “carefully abstained from measures designed to save his life” as the first US President came to hate him “because he was a democrat”, according to philosopher Bertrand Russell.

In Britain, Paine was convicted in absentia of “seditious libel”, an offence abolished in Scotland, England and Wales in 2010, long after it fell out of use. Free speech campaigner Lisa Appignanesi suggested Paine would have been pleased that MPs had finally agreed to take a historic step forward for “our right to speak and think freely” while then Justice Minister Claire Ward described sedition as an “arcane offence... from a bygone era when freedom of expression wasn’t seen as the right it is today”.

READ MORE: Clara Ponsati bailed following Edinburgh Sheriff Court appearance

READ MORE: Gambia frees Scot jailed for sedition

So the attempt by Spain to extradite ex-Catalan government minister Clara Ponsati, currently a professor at St Andrews University, for sedition in relation to her role in the Catalan independence movement raises some profound questions.

Regardless of the rights and wrongs of that particular case, we should be glad to live in a country where sedition, defined by the Encyclopaedia Britannica as “organising or encouraging opposition to government in a manner that falls short of the more dangerous offences constituting treason”, is no longer an offence and that those who campaign against the state are only prosecuted if they commit criminal acts like violence or intimidation.

The case against sedition was eloquently made by the writer Will Self in 2010: “In amongst the fast-growing leylandii of political correctness... there stands that hoary old oak, seditious libel. This has always been a shape-shifting law, capable of being employed as a cudgel against satirists, incendiarists, malcontents and revolutionaries alike. A mature democracy, with a tradition of open government and freedom of speech, has no need of such ancient Star Chamber inquisitions.”

However, such is the fundamentally hollow message of identity politics pushed by the right-wing populists of the modern world that they may seek to reintroduce such undemocratic laws. Sedition dates back to the 16th century and it is there where it belongs.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5045618.1573756899!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5045618.1573756899!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Former Catalan Minister Clara Ponsati. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Former Catalan Minister Clara Ponsati. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5045618.1573756899!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/environment/climate-activists-to-launch-week-long-hunger-strike-1-5046407","id":"1.5046407","articleHeadline": "Climate activists to launch week-long hunger strike","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573797600000 ,"articleLead": "

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046406.1573761267!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police hold a protester during an Extinction Rebellion demonstration in Westminster, London. Picture: Yui Mok/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

Environmental activists around the world have announced they will begin a week-long hunger strike next week in a bid to force global leaders to urgently tackle the “climate emergency”.

An octogenarian from the UK will join hundreds of others in at least 22 countries who have signed up to go without food in protest against a lack of action being taken to cut greenhouse gas emissions and halt ecological breakdown.

The decision is a “last resort tactic”, according to international campaign group Extinction Rebellion (XR), which is spearheading the hunger strike.

Members from the UK branch of XR have delivered a letter to the country’s main political parties as they prepare to go to the polls in next month’s general election.

In the letter they issue a dire warning about the future of the planet and call for meetings with leaders to demonstrate their commitment to battling climate change.

The letter states: “Today, humanity is at a crossroads. Either we unite to prevent the rapidly escalating climate and ecological collapse, or this nation and global society will disintegrate beyond recognition.

“Your party has an absolute duty of care, for the current and future well-being of everyone in the United Kingdom.”

La Pethick, an 83-year-old from East Sussex, is set to take part in the protest.

“I am going on hunger strike for my family’s future and for future generations,” she said.

Another UK striker, 67-year-old artist Marko Stepanov from London, said: “I will strike for seven days or more to show my dedication and determination. I believe that the hunger strike is the strongest, effective, non-violent way to progress our cause.”

The strike, which aims to highlight the vulnerability of world food supplies and force governments to enact Extinction Rebellion’s three demands – tell the truth; act now; and go beyond party polictics – has been scheduled to continue for a week.

The action was initiated by Giovanni Tamacas of Extinction Rebellion US, whose extended family in Vietnam and El Salvador is already experiencing many disastrous effects of global warming.

The 20-year-old said: “We are hunger striking because we have no choice. We are being taken to our deaths.

“Greedy governments and corporations have criminally and catastrophically failed to tackle the climate and ecological emergency.

“Our shortsighted governments are too systemically corrupt to stop mass starvation, societal collapse and the death of billions of humans.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5046406.1573761267!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046406.1573761267!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police hold a protester during an Extinction Rebellion demonstration in Westminster, London. Picture: Yui Mok/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police hold a protester during an Extinction Rebellion demonstration in Westminster, London. Picture: Yui Mok/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5046406.1573761267!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/scottish-students-told-to-return-home-from-hong-kong-amid-increased-civil-unrest-1-5046411","id":"1.5046411","articleHeadline": "Scottish students told to return home from Hong Kong amid increased civil unrest","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573761690000 ,"articleLead": "

Scottish students participating in exchange programmes in Hong Kong have been told to come home amid increased civic unrest and protests.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046410.1573761686!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Hong Kong has been rocked by months of civil unrest. Picture: AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The University of Edinburgh, which currently has 21 students on exchange in Hong Kong, sent out an email on Thursday telling students to return to the UK with immediate effect.

It comes following the University of Hong Kong's decision to suspend all classes for the remainder of the year due to an increase in civil unrest and violent protests in recent days.

Anti-government protests have riven Hong Kong and divided its people for more than five months and has shown no signs of ending.

Protesters have torched vehicles and buildings, hurled petrol bombs at police stations and trains, dropped debris from bridges on to traffic and vandalised shopping malls and campuses.

On Thursday pro-democracy protesters paralysed parts of the city for a fourth consecutive day, forcing schools to close and blocking highways. Thousands of students built campus barricades at several universities, hunkering down with piles of food as well as bricks, catapults and other home-made weapons.

Police said the Chinese University of Hong Kong had become “a weapons factory and an arsenal”, and that arrows had been fired at officers from Hong Kong Polytechnic University. “Their acts are another step closer to terrorism,” said Chief Superintendent John Tse Chun-chung of the Police Public Relations Branch, adding that police would temporarily avoid clashing with “high-spirited rioters”.

Several universities have announced there would be no classes on campuses for the rest of the year.

In a statement, the University of Edinburgh said it was necessary to prioritise the \"safety and wellbeing\" of its foreign exchange students.

A spokeswoman from the University of Edinburgh said: \"The suspension of classes at educational institutions in Hong Kong has affected 21 Edinburgh students, who are currently on exchange there.

\"We are therefore requesting that all of our students in Hong Kong return to the UK, at their earliest opportunity.

\"We are providing advice and support to each affected student to ensure all are in a position to return to the UK.\"

Four other UK universities, including Aberdeen University, have also sent out communications on Thursday telling students to return to the UK.

" ,"byline": {"email": "david.mclean@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "David Mclean"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5046410.1573761686!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046410.1573761686!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Hong Kong has been rocked by months of civil unrest. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Hong Kong has been rocked by months of civil unrest. Picture: AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5046410.1573761686!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/scottish-minister-warns-of-damaging-impact-of-us-trade-tariffs-1-5046389","id":"1.5046389","articleHeadline": "Scottish minister warns of damaging impact of US trade tariffs","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573759084000 ,"articleLead": "

Trade minister Ivan McKee has warned of the damaging impact US trade tariffs on Scottish products could have on the economy.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046388.1573759081!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Warehouseman Graham Rozga at the Jura whisky distillery on the Scottish island Jura. Master blenders from across the globe will meet in Scotland next month in search of the year's top whisky"} ,"articleBody": "

Speaking at the Scottish Parliament on Thursday, he said tariffs of 25% on goods including Scotch whisky, biscuits and woollen and cashmere products will have a direct impact on businesses.

US President Donald Trump has been a vocal proponent of imposing tariffs on foreign goods.

Mr McKee said: “Trade disputes may seem far removed from most people’s day-to-day lives, but the impact of these tariffs on Scottish businesses, and potential on people’s jobs, is immediate and real.

“Single malt Scotch whisky, cheese, butter, cashmere, and sweet biscuits including shortbread, are targeted by the tariffs.

“This is profoundly worrying for Scottish producers exporting, or planning to export, to the US.”

He added that the impact of the tariffs is being felt across Scotland - “from the villages of Speyside to the west coast island distilleries and the textile manufacturers of the Borders”.

He added: “These US tariffs have seen Scotland caught up in a trade dispute not of our making.

“They have a direct impact on Scottish businesses, but post-Brexit tariffs with the EU would multiply the scale of this impact on the Scottish economy.

“Our healthy current trade with the US shows that we do not need to leave the EU to trade successfully with the US.

“We can increase our exports to 25% of our GDP in the next 10 years, but Scotland’s voice must be heard and our interests represented in future trade deals.”

Scottish Conservative MSP Dean Lockhart said Scotch whisky and other vital sectors had become collateral damage in a much wider US-EU trade dispute.

He added: “The only reason Scotch whisky and other sectors are being hit with US tariffs is because we are still members of the EU.

“And because in this trade dispute, the EU has prioritised the interests of European aerospace, French champagne and other European sectors at the expense of Scotch whisky.

“The reality is that after Brexit, we will be free to negotiate our own free trade agreements with the rest of the world.”

Liberal Democrat MSP Mike Rumbles said: “Despite the current US president’s warm words about Brexit, his aggressive nationalism and protectionism tell a different story. His values are not the values that we share.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5046388.1573759081!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046388.1573759081!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Warehouseman Graham Rozga at the Jura whisky distillery on the Scottish island Jura. Master blenders from across the globe will meet in Scotland next month in search of the year's top whisky","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Warehouseman Graham Rozga at the Jura whisky distillery on the Scottish island Jura. Master blenders from across the globe will meet in Scotland next month in search of the year's top whisky","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5046388.1573759081!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/the-sinister-reason-why-i-was-once-labelled-a-potential-ira-supporter-jim-duffy-1-5046375","id":"1.5046375","articleHeadline": "The sinister reason why I was once labelled a potential IRA supporter – Jim Duffy","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1573756901000 ,"articleLead": "

Old traditions, ‘culture’ and prejudices are failing as technology and cheap travel breaks down barriers in our increasingly globalised world, writes Jim Duffy.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046373.1573756892!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A youth slashes the coat of Special Branch police officer George Johnston with an open razor during a pro-IRA march through Glasgow's Renfield Street in 1971 (Picture: Allan Milligan)"} ,"articleBody": "

Are you really who you think you are? I was recently on a plane trip to the UK. I got chatting to the chap sitting next to me, who was also from Glasgow. The Glaswegian accent is well-rehearsed and stands out a country mile.

As we chatted, it seems we shared a similar knowledge of the city. But, I knew that at some point in the conversation I would be asked the stand out question that almost 99 per cent of Glaswegian men ask each other when they get blethering.

Two minutes later and out it came. Are you a Celtic or Rangers man? Bingo! My standard reply to this is that I do not follow football at all, which is quite true. But, as my new travelling companion was only too eager to tell me, he was a Celtic man and this made me think.

Why do we take up identity positions and how do these ultimately polarise?

READ MORE: Why it’s important to remember Scotland doesn’t actually exist – Ian Johnston

READ MORE: Gordon Brown: ‘Independence is limited in a globalised world’

So much of our lives has been socially constructed by others over the decades and centuries. Our names, for example, can pinpoint where we are from, which area of the country and what team we may or may not support.

With a name like Duffy, I was immediately pigeon-holed by some as a “tarrier” when I joined the police some 25 years ago. This meant I was ostensibly from one side of the religious divide and for some even more extreme officers, a potential IRA supporter.

When the chips were down, would I take a position? Would I take a side? Unfortunately, by labelling me with this anachronism, my mindset immediately pitted me against them. And the “them” and “us” binary is causing even more problems nearly three decades on.

Inherited party allegiance

The problem is not the identity position that you are given, labelled with or adopt, but the easiness and willingness of many people to simply accept these positions. As we are in election mode just now, choices will have to be made on which political party to vote for. Or will it be which leader you decide to vote for? Are you left or right? Did that position stem from where your parents put their cross in the box? Did they get that leaning from their parents? And so on...

If you are a woman, will you take a position in brushing aside the ‘pale, male and stale’ politicians that may be on offer and place your X for Jo Swinson or Nicola Sturgeon for that matter? Or does it not matter what gender a political leader is?

Then we have the “us’ and “them” of country versus country. If I suggest to you that I am a global citizen, you may chortle or even raise an eyebrow. But, although I was born in Glasgow of Irish descent, I feel very much wedded to my position as an individual person on this planet.

That for me means wherever I lay my hat, that’s my home and I do not wish to be slotted into a nationality box, just because it suits someone else to do so. Scottish Independence and all that it could entail a clear and decisive “us” and “them”, both internally within the country and internationally with our neighbours. Albeit, and I have to concede here, that although an inward-looking policy for many, it may now lead to Scotland indeed being more European. A more outward-facing position in a world of polar opposites, some may suggest.

Choosing to think one way or the other, outwith neatly constructed boxes is not easy. One can be an advocate of social justice and welcome immigration for prosperity. Or conversely, a hater of the “underclass” and an advocate of “send them all back in the boats the came in”.

Youth brings hope

Extreme positions that cause others to take extreme positions which in turn fuel division and a sense of sides, tribes, teams and movements are easier to deal with cognitively. Yes, thinking is hard, but labelling is easy.

I wonder how our world would be if the social constructs of, for example, politics, religion, gender, education and nationality did not exist? And is it actually possible to move outside typical positions?

I’m going to go out on a limb and hope for the best. It may simply be a generational hand-me-down via DNA and environmental circumstances that have been confined by a lack of technology.

Further, as technology has improved and expanded, the new generations of young people, Generation X and Y, see less division and are breaking down old social constructs.

I fully accept that things like social media can cause awful polarisations and this is never been more transparent than when Donald Trump tweets. The current US President aside, I am hopeful that young people are being more tolerant, more willing to think about others and not simply stick them in a socially constructed bucket, because it’s easy to do so.

The connected world, cheap travel and what could be seen the failure of decades old traditions, ideas and culture is perhaps making younger people more amenable to breaking down the barriers of “us” and “them”. The question is, will we let them and support them or simply hand down the labels that we received and then cultivated?

It is hard to actually think about who you are and how you have the opinions and beliefs you have. It requires some forensic thinking. Breaking down our social constructs that have shaped us takes effort.

The question I always ask myself to help ground me in a wider reality is this: if aliens came down to Earth and interviewed me on who I am, what would I tell them and what would they think?

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5046373.1573756892!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046373.1573756892!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A youth slashes the coat of Special Branch police officer George Johnston with an open razor during a pro-IRA march through Glasgow's Renfield Street in 1971 (Picture: Allan Milligan)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A youth slashes the coat of Special Branch police officer George Johnston with an open razor during a pro-IRA march through Glasgow's Renfield Street in 1971 (Picture: Allan Milligan)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5046373.1573756892!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5046374.1573756898!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5046374.1573756898!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "People in Glasgow protest against attempts to evict asylum seekers (Picture: John Devlin)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "People in Glasgow protest against attempts to evict asylum seekers (Picture: John Devlin)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5046374.1573756898!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}