{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"world","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/uk-government-deeply-concerned-by-iran-seizure-of-british-oil-tanker-1-4968340","id":"1.4968340","articleHeadline": "UK Government 'deeply concerned' by Iran seizure of British oil tanker","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563609730455 ,"articleLead": "

The Government said it remains \"deeply concerned\" by the \"unacceptable\" seizure of a British-flagged oil tanker by Iranian authorities in the Persian Gulf.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4968339.1563610027!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Undated handout photo issued by Stena Bulk of the British oil tanker Stena Impero which is believed to have been captured in Iranian waters whilst en route to Saudi Arabia. Picture: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

The Stena Impero, which is registered in the UK, was seized by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard in the Strait of Hormuz for \"violating international maritime rules\", according to the semi-official Fars news agency.

Stena Bulk, which owns the Stena Impero, said the ship was in \"full compliance with all navigation and international regulations\".

READ MORE: British oil tanker with 23 onboard 'seized by Iran'

A second oil tanker, the Liberian-flagged Mesdar, which is managed by Norbulk Shipping UK, veered off course towards the Iranian coast after it was boarded by armed guards at around 5.30pm on Friday.

The Mesdar's Glasgow-based operator said communication had since been re-established with the ship and the crew were unharmed.

The Government's emergency committee Cobra met on Friday night to discuss the situation.

\"We remain deeply concerned about Iran's unacceptable actions which represent a clear challenge to international freedom of navigation,\" a Government spokesman said.

UK vessels have been advised to \"stay out of the area\" of the Strait of Hormuz for an \"interim period\", the spokesman said, adding: \"As the Foreign Secretary has said, our response will be considered and robust and there will be serious consequences if the situation is not resolved.\"

Iran's state-run IRNA news agency reported on Saturday that the seizure was due to a collision with an Iranian fishing boat.

The report said the British tanker caused damage to the fishing boat, then did not respond to calls from the smaller craft.

The fishing boat informed Iran's Ports and Maritime Organisation, which notified the Revolutionary Guard.

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt said he had spoken to US secretary of state Mike Pompeo about the situation and had tried to speak to Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, but he was on a plane.

A leading authority on British shipping said oil and gas prices will be affected if regional tensions continue.

There \"is no alternative route in and out of the Gulf\" for approximately a fifth of global oil and a third of the world's gas supply, according to Bob Sanguinetti from the UK Chamber of Shipping.

Mr Sanguinetti told the BBC: \"If this is to endure then clearly it's going to impact on trade routes, trade patterns and ultimately the price of those goods going through the Strait because they are going to have to be sourced from elsewhere.\"

A statement from Stena Bulk said ship manager Northern Marine Management had lost contact with the crew of 23 after \"unidentified small crafts and a helicopter\" approached the vessel at about 4pm on Friday.

The company said the tanker was in international waters at the time but appeared to be heading north towards Iran.

Erik Hanell, president and chief executive of Stena Bulk, said: \"There are 23 seafarers onboard of Indian, Russian, Latvian and Filipino nationality.

\"There have been no reported injuries and the safety and welfare of our crew remains our primary focus. We are in close contact with both the UK and Swedish government authorities to resolve this situation and we are liaising closely with our seafarers' families.\"

US president Donald Trump said America would be \"working with the UK\".

He told reporters: \"We will talk to the UK and we have no written agreement but we have an agreement. They've been a very great ally of ours.

\"So we heard about it, we heard it was one, we heard it was two, and we will be working with the UK.\"

The incident follows on from recent heightened tensions in the Gulf involving Iran, the US and UK.

Last week, the Royal Navy warship frigate HMS Montrose drove off three Iranian vessels which tried to stop the commercial ship British Heritage as it sailed through the Strait of Hormuz.

Fears were raised that the Iranian authorities were trying to seize a UK ship in retaliation for the detention of the Grace 1 tanker.

The Iranian ship was detained off the coast of Gibraltar on July 4 after it was suspected of violating EU sanctions by carrying a cargo of crude oil destined for Syria.

Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei called the tanker's seizure an act of \"piracy\" on Tuesday and warned the UK to expect a response.

Mr Hunt offered to help release Grace 1 if Iran guaranteed it would not breach sanctions imposed on Bashar Assad's regime.

European allies to the US have been urged to take a tougher stance on Iran after Mr Trump withdrew from a nuclear deal with Tehran.

" ,"byline": {"email": "pa@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "PA Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4968339.1563610027!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4968339.1563610027!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Undated handout photo issued by Stena Bulk of the British oil tanker Stena Impero which is believed to have been captured in Iranian waters whilst en route to Saudi Arabia. Picture: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Undated handout photo issued by Stena Bulk of the British oil tanker Stena Impero which is believed to have been captured in Iranian waters whilst en route to Saudi Arabia. Picture: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4968339.1563610027!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/moon-landing-was-giant-leap-towards-becoming-an-interplanetary-species-leader-comment-1-4968245","id":"1.4968245","articleHeadline": "Moon landing was ‘giant leap’ towards becoming an interplanetary species – leader comment","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563598800000 ,"articleLead": "

As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing and Neil Armstrong’s “giant leap”, it’s right to look towards Mars.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4968244.1563559937!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Apollo 11 space mission US astronaut Buzz Aldrin is seen conducting experiments on the moon's surface in a picture taken by Neil Armstrong (Picture: Neil Armstrong/Nasa via AFP/Getty)"} ,"articleBody": "

Fifty years ago today, humanity took a “giant leap” forward. And since that momentous day in 1969, when Neil Armstrong first set a human foot on the Moon, there have been a number of other truly extraordinary developments in the story of our species.

Without doubt, one of the most important has been the stunning pace of technological advancements in computing. The computers used by Nasa for the Apollo 11 mission were far less powerful than those many of us carry in our pockets today. An iPhone can have about 100,000 times more processing power than Apollo 11’s computer and seven million times more storage. However, we can probably all agree we are not getting anything like seven million times the benefit. Indeed, the ability to watch a cleverly manipulated ‘deep fake’ video which claims to prove the Moon landing was staged in a film studio over lunch is a step backwards.

READ MORE: How moon landing conspiracy theories began and why they persist today – Professor Peter Knight

READ MORE: Speeding up Moon mission will bring Mars landing closer, says Nasa

Amazing technology is all very well, but it’s how we use it that really matters. Some people think spending large amounts of money on spaceflight when there are huge, pressing problems on Earth is a needless waste. But the Moon landing, even though it was born out of the Space Race between two Cold War rivals, was one of those rare moments when pretty much the whole world was united in hope. It was a sign of the great things that we can achieve when we really put our minds to it. And those kinds of signs are really important.

Perhaps, in some ways, it happened too soon because in 1969 we weren’t in a position to exploit the ability to go the Moon. The last human landing was in 1972 as our interest quickly waned. In a sense, it was a premature prelude to an even bigger leap – sending humans to Mars. So much so that Nasa plans to return to the Moon as part of its preparations for a historic mission to the Red Planet.

The difficulties of such a journey cannot be understated but, as Nasa says, it will be “an achievement recalled with awe far into humanity’s future”.

Right now, we are an Earth-bound species. At some point in the near future, we are likely to break those shackles and become an interplanetary one.

Surely, that cannot but help to give us a new perspective on life, one that will help us with more everyday concerns, just as it did for the astronauts who saw that first ‘Earth-rise’ from the surface of the Moon.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4968244.1563559937!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4968244.1563559937!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Apollo 11 space mission US astronaut Buzz Aldrin is seen conducting experiments on the moon's surface in a picture taken by Neil Armstrong (Picture: Neil Armstrong/Nasa via AFP/Getty)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Apollo 11 space mission US astronaut Buzz Aldrin is seen conducting experiments on the moon's surface in a picture taken by Neil Armstrong (Picture: Neil Armstrong/Nasa via AFP/Getty)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4968244.1563559937!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/no-place-for-trump-racism-on-isle-of-lewis-or-in-woody-guthrie-s-songbook-brian-wilson-1-4968237","id":"1.4968237","articleHeadline": "No place for Trump racism on Isle of Lewis or in Woody Guthrie’s songbook – Brian Wilson","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563598800000 ,"articleLead": "

It is to the eternal credit of the Isle of Lewis that it has shown not the slightest interest in acknowledging, far less exploiting, the exceptionally close familial links with Donald Trump.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4968236.1563559897!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Woody Guthrie sang about the racism of the current US President's father Fred (Picture: AP)"} ,"articleBody": "

One can only wish that same sense of discernment had occurred to his over-eager political facilitators at Menie Sands, with local people trampled into the rough. And credit to Robert Gordon University for ditching him as an honorary graduand four years ago.

There is no Trump Trail in Lewis and never will be. I suspect it would have been rather different in Ireland, no matter how villainous the individual, if a fraction of the same connection could have been established.

READ MORE: All UK politicians must fight Donald Trump’s foul racism – leader comment

READ MORE: Leader comment: A denunciation of Donald Trump

The key to Trump and the vile racism that is now laid bare for the world to see lies not in his mother but in his father. For decades, Fred Trump pretended to be of Swedish rather than German extraction, while rubbing shoulders with the American far-right.

As late as the 1980s Donald Trump biography, The Art of the Deal, the “Swedish” lie was maintained.

However, the dad’s inherent racism had been chronicled by an unlikely witness. Woody Guthrie, the great American balladeer of the 20th century, was one of his tenants and wrote a song:

‘I suppose that Old Man Trump knows just how much racial hate

He stirred up in that bloodpot of human hearts

When he drawed that color line

Here at his 1800 Family Project’

Like father, like son. They both knew their markets.

The current Trump’s numbers people will have decided he is on a winner – the more racist, the more electable.

The truly frightening thought is that they might be right.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4968236.1563559897!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4968236.1563559897!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Woody Guthrie sang about the racism of the current US President's father Fred (Picture: AP)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Woody Guthrie sang about the racism of the current US President's father Fred (Picture: AP)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4968236.1563559897!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/in-a-country-where-1-in-34-babies-die-at-birth-this-clinic-hasn-t-had-a-death-in-10-years-susan-dalgety-1-4968072","id":"1.4968072","articleHeadline": "In a country where 1 in 34 babies die at birth, this clinic hasn’t had a death in 10 years – Susan Dalgety","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563598800000 ,"articleLead": "

Malawi has one of highest maternal mortality rates in the world, but Susan Dalgety visits a clinic that is doing extraordinary work despite scant resources.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4968071.1563546374!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Acting High Commissioner Gary Leslie presents a Commonwealth Point of Light award to Charity Salima (Picture: British High Commmission, Malawi, @UKinMalawi)"} ,"articleBody": "

Charity stopped. She bent down and firmly pulled out the young woman’s breast from under her chitenje.

Speaking softly, but firmly, she explained to her how the tiny baby in her arms needed to latch on to her engorged nipple. “Like this,” smiled Charity, pushing the mother’s breast closer.

And just like that, mother and baby bonded.

The young woman visibly relaxed as her first born began to feed, and Charity stepped back, satisfied.

“She gave birth in the hospital, not here in my clinic,” explained Charity. “They don’t have time to properly explain how breastfeeding works, so often women will come to me when their baby is crying, because they are not feeding well. Now, let me show you the labour ward, another baby girl has just been born, only 30 minutes ago.”

And she took me to meet Evelyn, a healthy, calm infant, weighing 3.4kg and already the apple of her grandmother’s eye, who was sitting proudly with the baby swaddled on her lap.

Evelyn’s mother, Marvellous, who had given birth less than an hour ago, said a faint hello from under a warm blanket, apparently not the least fazed that a stranger had interrupted this most private of moments. “It’s okay,” laughed Charity. “You’re a woman. You are welcome here.”

Mama Salima, as she is known in the community, is a force of nature. Ten years ago, she gave up a secure job as a senior research nurse to open her own community clinic in Area 23, one of Lilongwe’s most crowded townships.

“My family were confused,” she laughed, remembering their reaction. “How will you eat?” they asked. “I told them, ‘The Lord is my Shepherd’ and look, he has provided.”

Charity and her team of staff and volunteers have delivered 8,000 babies in a decade. All survived, a remarkable record in a country with one of the highest maternal mortality rates in the world. The latest figures from USAID show that one in 174 mothers die giving birth, and one in 34 babies die at birth, usually from asphyxiation, low birth weight or infection.

What is Charity’s secret? “Experience,” she says. “I know how long a labour should last. And if there are any signs of distress, in the mother or the baby, then we send her to Bwaila, the maternity unit at the central hospital.”

READ MORE: Malawi turns to peaceful protest and powerful theatre – Susan Dalgety

READ MORE: Susan Dalgety: A country of 18 million – and just 39 dentists to treat them

She might also have added expertise. Walking round the small but perfectly appointed clinic with Charity, it is clear she is at the top of her profession, despite very limited resources.

There is none of the high-tech, eye-wateringly expensive equipment we take for granted in our labour wards. No birthing pools, no baby boxes, and no anxious fathers. “We encourage men to come,” says Charity. “In our culture, childbirth is only for women, but it is changing. And I expect the man to come when we have family planning sessions. A woman does not get pregnant alone ...” she guffaws.

Charity has won many accolades. She is dubbed Malawi’s Florence Nightingale, her work has been featured on CNN, and only last week, she was presented with a Commonwealth Point of Light Award for her work by Britain’s acting High Commissioner, Gary Leslie, another Scot in Malawi.

Handing over the Queen’s award, he acknowledged that maternal and newborn health is still a big challenge across many Commonwealth countries, and pointed to Charity as a role model.

“I hope Charity’s life of service and this award will inspire others to contribute towards tackling some of the greatest social challenges of our time,” he said.

But even the indomitable Charity cannot work miracles on her own. “We need support all the time, Sue,” she told me, as I was getting ready to leave. “We are very grateful for our partnership with Freedom from Fistula (founded by Scot Ann Gloag). We get support from George Watson’s College, in Edinburgh. And you know Linda McDonald, she is a Scottish midwife. She helped us tremendously, but there is always a worry. We always need new equipment.”

Top of Charity’s wish list is a £1,000 machine that will help deliver oxygen to new born babies in distress. Even a few minutes of oxygen deprivation at birth can cause life-changing conditions such as cerebral palsy, or even death.

The health of all the nation’s children has been the focus of the government’s work this week. While politicians and civil society continue to argue over the election results, the Ministry of Health has been holding a week-long campaign, known as Child Health Days.

Health workers across the country have set up temporary clinics in rural areas – where over 80 per cent of the population live – to offer basic, preventative healthcare to under-fives and new mothers.

Children have received doses of Albendazole to get rid of intestinal worms, vitamin A to promote their immune system and protect their eye-sight, and micronutrient powders to tackle malnutrition. And mothers are being encouraged to breastfeed for the first two years of their baby’s life.

Health experts say about 1.4 million children in Malawi suffer from stunted growth because of lack of proper nutrition, and it is not just their height and weight that suffers. Poor nutrition can also affect a child’s cognitive development, making schooling even more difficult. It is easy to become despondent about Malawi’s future. The scale of the challenges, in maternal health and for under-fives alone, is daunting. Throw in a million people living with HIV/Aids, the impact of climate change, inflation running at nine per cent, and a national government that has the same resources for 18 million people that Glasgow City Council has for 600,000, and the future looks bleak.

Some Malawi friends shrug and say, “it is hopeless.” Others, like Charity, point to God and smile confidently, “He will provide”.

After three months in this beautiful, welcoming, at times infuriating, but always fascinating country, I am more optimistic than I was when I landed at Kamuzu International Airport.

In recent years, Malawi has cut the number of children deficient in vitamin A from 51 per cent to three per cent, a feat described by Unicef as “remarkable”, and better than any other country.

It has made significant strides in tacking HIV/Aids, with the annual death toll dropping from 64,000 in 2005 to 12,000 last year.

And there are countless Malawians like Charity, doing what they can to build their country. All they need is a little help from their friends across the globe.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4968071.1563546374!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4968071.1563546374!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Acting High Commissioner Gary Leslie presents a Commonwealth Point of Light award to Charity Salima (Picture: British High Commmission, Malawi, @UKinMalawi)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Acting High Commissioner Gary Leslie presents a Commonwealth Point of Light award to Charity Salima (Picture: British High Commmission, Malawi, @UKinMalawi)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4968071.1563546374!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/why-matthew-parris-is-so-wrong-about-donald-trump-s-go-home-tweet-paris-gourtsoyannis-1-4967490","id":"1.4967490","articleHeadline": "Why Matthew Parris is so wrong about Donald Trump’s ‘go home’ tweet – Paris Gourtsoyannis","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563531555000 ,"articleLead": "

It doesn’t matter which immigrants are targeted – Donald Trump’s ‘go home’ rhetoric opens the door to violence, writes Paris Gourtsoyannis.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4967489.1563531551!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Times columnist Matthew Parris has denied the US President is 'dabbling in racist politics' (Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty)"} ,"articleBody": "

Since the last few days of US political rhetoric will be studied by historians for some time, here a some snapshots from the past: In 1844, the city of Philadelphia was convulsed by race riots over three months, resulting in at least 20 deaths and requiring 1,000 troops to stop the violence.

In 1891, after a jury acquitted some of the defendants in a trial for the murder of a police officer, a mob of thousands stormed a New Orleans courtroom and shot dead 11 of them.

And in 1909, in Omaha, Nebraska, a young man was arrested while taking an English lesson from a woman. On the way to jail, he pulled out a gun and shot the officer who arrested him. Local politicians held a public meeting, whipping up a mob of at least 900 men who nearly lynched the gunman, then attacked and burnt down his neighbourhood, beating women and children and reportedly killing a boy. The entire community was driven out of the city.

These accounts sound like they belong to the hateful past of America’s Deep South, and slavery’s legacy of racism. But the communities targeted weren’t African American. In Philadelphia, it was Irish Catholics; in New Orleans, Italians; and in Omaha, the pogrom was aimed at Greeks.

READ MORE: Theresa May finally stands up to Donald Trump (without saying his name) – leader comment

READ MORE: Donald Trump is a racist but the US is better than him – Kenny MacAskill

‘Anti-Greek hatred’ just looks strange written down. But one of Canada’s worst race riots took place in 1918, when anger at Greece’s official neutrality in WWI spilled out into the streets of Toronto. There were similar wartime riots in the Australian city of Perth, as well as outback mining towns. Of course, the point isn’t to make a comparison with the appalling, continuing toll of racism on visible, non-white communities – rather that whenever minorities and outsiders are told to go home, it opens the door to violence. The history of ‘go home’ rhetoric confirms: it’s profoundly racist and always has been.

And even when integration over generations brings violence to an end, bigotry survives for decades more. ‘No Greeks’ and ‘no Italians’ could be found outside boarding houses and in newspaper classified ads in the first half of the 20th Century, just like the ‘no blacks’ and ‘no Irish’ that lasted into the second half.

As a masters student in 1970s Montreal, my mother – born and raised in Canada as a third-generation immigrant – was told by professors not to study French because “this course is too difficult for a Greek girl”. Immigrants almost always start at the bottom of the economic ladder, with little or no power and influence. Historically, they were used as strikebreakers, often without their knowledge; today, they continue to be accused of taking housing and jobs away from established communities, driving down wages, and are vilified for their religion or held accountable for the actions of governments they leave behind – or even flee.

That’s why Times columnist Matthew Parris’ claim that President Trump’s comments would “strike a chord among millions who should not be called racists” is so wrong. He denied the US President was “dabbling in racist politics”, explaining: “There is such a thing as courtesy to a host country, even if it’s now theirs too. If in earlier centuries the many Irish and Italian (white) immigrants to the US had seemed to attack too fiercely and too early the beliefs and values of the country that had taken them or their parents in, they would have attracted irritation. ‘Why did they come there, then?’ is a question that, like it or not, would be asked.”

In a free, democratic society, participating in peaceful political debate is, in fact, a courtesy; and a place you live in – let alone somewhere you were born – ceases to become a ‘host’ once you call it your home. It is deeply sinister to talk about second and third generation immigrants as ‘guests’ – or even, as Parris wouldn’t but some do, ‘parasites’.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4967489.1563531551!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4967489.1563531551!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Times columnist Matthew Parris has denied the US President is 'dabbling in racist politics' (Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Times columnist Matthew Parris has denied the US President is 'dabbling in racist politics' (Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4967489.1563531551!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"6061421974001"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/i-m-no-aoc-fan-but-donald-trump-should-apologise-jim-duffy-1-4967488","id":"1.4967488","articleHeadline": "I’m no AOC fan but Donald Trump should apologise – Jim Duffy","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563512400000 ,"articleLead": "

I’m no fan of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s politics – which seem to be from the Jeremy Corbyn school of economics – but Donald Trump has gone too far this time, writes Jim Duffy.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4967487.1563466327!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Gerard Butler and co battle to save the US President from external enemies in the film Olympus Has Fallen"} ,"articleBody": "

Our very own Gerard Butler stars in the Hollywood hit movie, Olympus Has Fallen. Alongside the great Morgan Freeman and few other secret service personnel, they do pretty well against some awful baddies. Gerard Butler, aka Mike Banning, is that one brave man who is not afraid to mix it up with bad people and give it right back to them where it hurts. I won’t tell you the full plot in case you go to watch it online, but suffice to say, it is as good, if not better, than any Bruce Willis Die Hard movie. But, the title of the movie made me think deeper about the White House.

Olympus is the term given to the White House, no doubt at some point by the American Secret Service to identify it. It is a specific handle that makes the building and all that it represents stand out as a big deal.

And I guess we may all agree that the White House is a “big deal”. What it signifies as a signifier to the world is freedom, integrity, virtue, discretion and democracy.

It is the pinnacle of power and honour in the West. This was why it was no doubt targeted in the 9/11 planning and execution.

But, I’m afraid not even Gerard Butler could save the current White House from a new baddie. One that lurks within. No, Donald Trump is single-handedly bringing down the White House with his behaviour.

I’m afraid to say it, but Olympus has fallen.

READ MORE: Donald Trump is a racist but the US is better than him – Kenny MacAskill

READ MORE: Will UK laugh along with Boris Johnson if he goes full Donald Trump? – Laura Waddell

How ironic that the threat to the White House has not come from outside its gates and walls. The secret service agents guard it day in and day out, 24/7, but they have their sights trained on external events that may harm those inside those hallowed grounds. The guard dogs and their handlers are alert to what may be going on at the perimeter fences all around the building as tourists shuffle on the pavements taking selfies and more. But, as they guard the inhabitants inside, the threat has grown there in a place where dignity and professionalism were once watchwords for all. It seems to me and many that Donald Trump is the enemy within.

But let me give some perspective to be fair to the 45th President of the United States. I do not particularly care for the policies and mantras of his adversaries, Nancy Pelosi or Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (AOC).

Ocasio-Cortez feels to me to be very much from the Jeremy Corbyn school of economics. Almost the antithesis of Donald Trumponomics.

But, this immensely smart and articulate young Democrat who serves as the US Representative for New York’s 14th congressional district is a rising star who is afraid of nothing. She wants to redistribute wealth in the USA like Bernie Sanders.

Many see her policies as fiscally naive. But, if one were to think about some of her and her associates’ ideas, one may think – hold on a minute, that ain’t half bad. For example, why has America got so many billionaires? Do they really need all that wealth? And if one took the cash from billionaires, still leaving them plenty, it could build a better health system and so on...

One of her policy advisors, Dan Riffle, has as his handle on Twitter – “Every Billionaire is a Policy Failure”. Says it all and paints a vivid picture of where AOC’s economics come from. But, that does not mean she should be abused.

President Trump singled her and three of her colleagues out this week. You can read it everywhere. He has been duly chastised and his comments categorised as “racist”. I’m not 100 per cent convinced that he truly meant them to be racist. The media reported heavily on him suggesting the four women could go back to where they came from, but failed on several occasions, to mention that Mr Trump wanted them to to come back.

Nonetheless when you screw about with Twitter in a world of fake news, be prepared for what comes your way. To even suggest something like this, especially in the USA which prides itself on the exploits of its immigrants, hard work and the American dream, is political suicide. Or at least it should be.

I didn’t care for Barack Obama. He seems more like a Harvard professor than a President. But, under his leadership and stewardship, I don’t think we have ever had such a more dignified, respectful and professionally run White House. And we know now and probably guessed at the time, that he had a wonderful lady in his wife Michelle, guiding him and helping him live up to his values. Does anyone have any idea what Melanie Trump is saying to Donald just now? I’m not hopeful here that she will be chastising him or directing him. No, she is no Michelle Obama. Mr Obama, all that you did in finessing the image of the White House is being systematically and brutishly dismantled. It is time you got back to politics and forgot the after-dinner speaking – for now.

Olympus has fallen – hard. The good grace and political prowess of the likes of Obama has been shattered by the thuggish and “racist” outbursts of Trump. Politicians will have views, debates and policies that are diametrically opposed to their adversaries on many occasions. This is plain to see when we look at the Tories and Labour in the UK. But, when senior politicians start the debate about their foe’s race, ethnicity and country of birth, then we are on very unsafe ground. Mr Trump should apologise. His ratings would rocket. But that ain’t gonna happen. We will all look back in ten or 20 years at this time when the White House and all it stood for was attacked – from within.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4967487.1563466327!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4967487.1563466327!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Gerard Butler and co battle to save the US President from external enemies in the film Olympus Has Fallen","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Gerard Butler and co battle to save the US President from external enemies in the film Olympus Has Fallen","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4967487.1563466327!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/aoc-is-an-american-superhero-who-can-send-toddler-trump-for-timeout-hayley-matthews-1-4967115","id":"1.4967115","articleHeadline": "AOC is an American superhero who can send Toddler Trump for timeout – Hayley Matthews","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563512400000 ,"articleLead": "

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, known as AOC, was one of the politicians Donald Trump told to ‘go home’ to another country even thought she was born in the US. Hayley Matthews says she should be seen as superhero for her positivity in bleak times.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4967114.1563448088!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Born in the USA: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (Picture: Alex Wroblewski/Getty)"} ,"articleBody": "

I like to think that I’m the kind of person who doesn’t get too easily offended. I have quite a thick skin and wouldn’t class myself as being in the snowflake generation. Just in case you’re wondering what a snowflake is, the term “snowflake generation” was one of Collins English Dictionary’s 2016 words of the year. Collins defines the term as “the young adults of the 2010s, viewed as being less resilient and more prone to taking offence than previous generations”.

I think we can take offence far too easily these days and some people really need to lighten up on social media. This struck me recently on reading a post online about the superheroes at Ocean Terminal being all male. There were quite a few comments and people being incredibly upset and offended, probably too much.

One comment stood out to me which said “who cares, if it offends you, don’t go”. That summed it up for many, however the feminist in me couldn’t help but pine for a female superhero mannequin standing proud in Ocean Terminal.

READ MORE: Will UK laugh along with Boris Johnson if he goes full Donald Trump? – Laura Waddell

READ MORE: Donald Trump is a racist but the US is better than him – Kenny MacAskill

I couldn’t help leaving a wee comment myself saying “All the female superheroes are busy taking their kids to Ocean Terminal!” And that’s the beauty of the internet, the free speech certainly flows – unless the digits bashing away on the keypad belong to Donald Trump. Should he be allowed free speech online like the rest of us? Well, when every second hashtag seems to be #MAGA2020 and you’re hoping to come out trumps in the 2020 presidential election, I’d maybe be thinking about bringing it down a notch or two.

The orange-faced keyboard warrior’s harsh comments, normally divisive and the kind you certainly wouldn’t expect to come from a president, seem to shock us less and less as he tests the boundaries of what’s socially acceptable to the average human.

He reminds me of a toddler pushing their parents to see what they can get away with and it scares me that we’ve reached a point where he can make flyaway comments and not be held accountable.

Asking for Donald Trump to be impeached in recent times is a phase that probably has the same standing as “would you like to supersize that meal?” Now, by no means am I going all snowflake on you here, but his comments made to the four congresswomen earlier in the week have shocked me to the core.

How have we gotten to a point where we have come to expect it from him? Launching a tirade on a group of Democrat congresswomen, telling them to “go back” to the places they came from – as his administration launched a nationwide crackdown on illegal immigration – has surely got to be the last straw before he gets a lifetime ban from Twitter.

The sheer lack of respect that he has for these women has left me wanting to reply to every tweet he’s ever posted telling him to shut up! These women (bar one) were born in America! Take, for instance, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, who was a waitress only a year ago, and is now at the top of her political game, serving her community to help make affordable housing and the basics accessible to all.

She is the real superhero if you ask me. Her personality and social media pages radiate positivity, love and equality with not a snowflake comment in sight. Alexandria for 2020, oh and a mannequin with her wearing a cape in Ocean Terminal too please!

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4967114.1563448088!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4967114.1563448088!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Born in the USA: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (Picture: Alex Wroblewski/Getty)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Born in the USA: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (Picture: Alex Wroblewski/Getty)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4967114.1563448088!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/apollo-11-moon-landing-anniversary-is-a-time-to-remember-unsung-heroes-martyn-mclaughlin-1-4965802","id":"1.4965802","articleHeadline": "Apollo 11 moon landing anniversary is a time to remember unsung heroes – Martyn McLaughlin","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563446869000 ,"articleLead": "

The success of the Moon landing is down to geeks as much as all-American heroes, writes Martyn McLaughlin.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965801.1563446867!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Nasa trailblazer JoAnn Morgan watches the launch of Apollo 11 at Cape Canaveral (NASA via AP)"} ,"articleBody": "

In the roll call of characters who wrote Apollo 11’s nationhood-transcending history, the top billing is understandably reserved for astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. It is they, after all, who made history as ambassadors of humankind, setting foot onto a ­­
far-flung celestial body.

Michael Collins, Apollo 11’s ­command module pilot, who watched on, fearful that catastrophe would intervene to ensure he would make the return to Earth alone, played an integral part in the mission.

So too did the many pioneers whose names occupy a mere footnote of history, despite the fact that without their expertise and composure, the disaster Collins feared – or much worse – would have almost inevitably come to pass.

The semicentennial celebrations of the Moon landing is an occasion to remember those who occupy the foothills of the credits. One of the statistics surrounding Project Apollo, which seems to me both remarkable and entirely rational, is that around 400,000 people were involved in rendering the impossible possible.

This army of engineers, scientists, programmers, mathematicians, and technicians defied technological limitations and bureaucratic wrangling to produce approximately five-and-a-half million parts which, working in unison, spirited Apollo’s crew to the Moon and back.

READ MORE: How moon landing conspiracy theories began and why they persist today – Professor Peter Knight

READ MORE: 50 years since the moon landing: why Scotland is the true home of astronaut Neil Armstrong

In any other corporate environment, the prospect of workers on the ground feeling disconnected from the mission’s overall goal would barely warrant concern. But Project Apollo’s programme ­manager, George Müller, knew fine well the risks of letting such apathy go unchecked. He ensured the astronauts toured factories across America tasked with manufacturing the spacecraft components. This was no mere public relations exercise. It reminded workers that a single oversight on their part could kill the men standing before them, and it forged a sense of collective responsibility.

Nowhere was this esprit de corps more evident than Building 30 of Nasa’s Johnson Space Centre in Houston, Texas, home to the Apollo mission operations control centre (MOCR), where the spacecraft’s ­navigation, propulsion, life support, and communications systems were monitored with unflinching ­scrutiny.

At any given time, between 20 and 30 men – and one trailblazing woman, JoAnn Morgan, the instrumentation controller – held in their hands the lives of three men a ­quarter of a million miles away.

Their number included Stephen Bales, the son of a janitor and a ­beautician, who less than five years previously had moved from the farming community of Fremont, Iowa, to join Nasa as an intern, responsible for guided tours.

In an interview with 13 Minutes to the Moon, a superb BBC World Service podcast detailing the graft, ingenuity, and composure which underpinned the final descent to the lunar surface, Bales recently reflected on the mission that would define his career. Without him, it would have probably ended in failure.

As the Eagle craft neared the Moon, an alarm code known as 1202 flashed on its on-board computer display. It was the only moment in the entire mission when a degree of urgency, if not fear, could be heard in Armstrong’s voice.

Bales, by then one of Apollo 11’s guidance officers, saw the alarm four seconds later. Initially unsure of its significance, he remembered the last simulation he and the flight controllers had carried out before the landing proper.

Back then a similar code, known as 1210, had appeared, prompting Bales to call an abort. In the subsequent debriefing, he immersed himself in the myriad alarms that could be triggered, working with Jack Garman, a computer specialist, to understand their meaning.

In doing so, they realised a 1202 referred to a software reboot which cancelled all the processes that the computer was running; crucially, it happened so fast, no vital guidance or navigation data would be lost.

So when the code appeared for real, Bales knew the mission could continue. It was a decision made in the space of 16 seconds – “an eternity,” said Bales – but it saved Apollo 11. There are countless other stories like his. Take that of John Aaron from Oklahoma, the son of a cattle rancher and a minister, recruited by Nasa at 22 without an interview.

He felt as if he had walked into a foreign country where people spoke another language, on account of the dizzying number of acronyms being hurled around. After just six weeks, he contemplated jacking it all in. Fortunately for him, and the Apollo programme, he knuckled down.

Only a few months later, his split-second decision making was credited with saving Apollo 12 after its rocket was struck by lightning.

It is difficult to conceive of the pressure these men worked under, as they analysed the spaceflight while listening to three, if not four conversations simultaneously on communication channels known as ‘loops’.

The average age of those inside MOCR was just 26, and as Gerry Griffin, the flight director during Apollo 11’s fraught re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere, has pointed out, their youth counted in their favour. “It was the lack of fear,” he explained. “It wasn’t the lack of knowing it was risky.”

It also means that, half a century on, many of them are still with us, able to reflect on an epoch-defining moment and receive our thanks for the part they played in it.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4965801.1563446867!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965801.1563446867!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Nasa trailblazer JoAnn Morgan watches the launch of Apollo 11 at Cape Canaveral (NASA via AP)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Nasa trailblazer JoAnn Morgan watches the launch of Apollo 11 at Cape Canaveral (NASA via AP)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4965801.1563446867!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"6057385830001"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/will-uk-laugh-along-with-boris-johnson-if-he-goes-full-donald-trump-laura-waddell-1-4966598","id":"1.4966598","articleHeadline": "Will UK laugh along with Boris Johnson if he goes full Donald Trump? – Laura Waddell","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563446745000 ,"articleLead": "

Will UK still laugh at Boris Johnson’s antics if he continues to liken Muslim women to letter boxes as Prime Minister, asks Laura Waddell.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966597.1563446741!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May holds hands with Donald Trump in January 2017 shortly after he took office as US President (Picture: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

Donald Trump has always been a racist, and other -ists beside. Every time there is a new event that would topple any ordinary president – were these ordinary times, and not, as it sometimes feels, like weird, weather-warped end of times – Trump carries on unperturbed by consequences. Opposition from fellow Republicans, where it exists, like the smattering of resignations when he was sworn in, has barely registered. Republicans didn’t abandon Trump during the ‘pussy grabbing’ or Charlottesville episodes, which now feel like previous eras, because so much has happened since. He’s held fast during increasing public horror at the dawning reality of Concentration Camps.

Why now does it feel like his most recent stunt – telling four congresswoman, born in America, to ‘go home’ – is finally causing a mild ripple in his support, not least with world leaders who’ve condemned it, even if, like May, they’ve previously held his hand?

READ MORE: Scottish Tories ‘ready to declare loyalty’ to Boris Johnson

READ MORE: All UK politicians must fight Donald Trump’s foul racism – leader comment

On Tuesday, the House of Representatives passed an unusual resolution to condemn Trump’s “racist comments that have legitimised fear and hatred”, with support from only four Republicans. But others among his base appear less keen to vocally defend Trump than before – although many do with the fervour of televangelists. Quieter Republicans haven’t suddenly developed conscience. Standing with the administration and backing Trump’s grotesque campaign is a failed test. But with legal webs tightening around figures who have been close to Trump, like personal friend Jeffrey Epstein, and as 2020 elections loom, perhaps reality is sinking in that there will, one way or another, be a post-Trump era. If it’s too late for their souls, perhaps it’s not too late for them to follow the direction of power wherever it surges next, for pay-off in this lifetime at least.

With a new Prime Minister coming in the UK, we might get our own mini-Trump soon, the shadow self of the blimp across the Atlantic. While May has submerged the true catastrophe of Brexit under surface of stern respectability, frontrunner Boris Johnson has of course always traded on clown antics. If he wins the two-horse race, it will be a new challenge for Conservatives to stand under him.

In the circus, who follows a clown? Only other clowns, who pile into the clown car, inevitably going on fire. For all the UK has felt like the wheels have come off entirely in recent years, there has been the feeling that things are even worse stateside. It will be less easy to pretend things are just about holding together, with Johnson leading the charge, tripping over his untied shoes.

Scottish Conservatives have had a fairly easy ride distancing themselves from difficult-to-swallow policy established by Conservatives in the south, particularly when clashing with outwardly progressive credentials. May’s legacy will not be remembered as friendly to women, nor the policies she inherited. In this time, Ruth Davidson published her book Yes She Can, billed as a “rallying call for generations to come”, telling the stories of some high achievers. (At the time, my request for a review copy was not answered, but I’ve subsequently had a good flick through it.)

Banal ‘yas queen’ platitudes do little for those who’ve borne the brunt of Tory policy – thousands of people who died after being found fit to work, the rape clause, sanctions, widening gap between rich and poor, rising numbers of children in poverty... But a book is a nice feather in the cap for personal profile, which helps when spinning a public face at odds with reality of systemic Tory cruelty.

Like overseas, the UK is now entering a new phase to test followers of shambolic leaders. The risk of embarrassment is higher. But for those who’ve willingly been led this far, it’s merely going to be a bit trickier to straddle a tank and carry on laughing next time Johnson does something on a par with likening Muslim women to letter boxes.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4966597.1563446741!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966597.1563446741!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Theresa May holds hands with Donald Trump in January 2017 shortly after he took office as US President (Picture: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Theresa May holds hands with Donald Trump in January 2017 shortly after he took office as US President (Picture: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4966597.1563446741!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"6052109261001"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/donald-trump-is-a-racist-but-the-us-is-better-than-him-kenny-macaskill-1-4966277","id":"1.4966277","articleHeadline": "Donald Trump is a racist but the US is better than him – Kenny MacAskill","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563430756000 ,"articleLead": "

Right-thinking folk were appalled by Donald Trump’s racist comments, a new low even by his contemptible standards.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966276.1563430752!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump holds a 'Made In America' product showcase at the White House (Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

The Democrat politicians he attacked embodying all that so many find admirable in the great American melting pot. A young Hispanic American and a Somali immigrant adding to the vitality of a society and bringing energy and ideas. Whereas he represents the white elite and the prejudice that so many of them exude from every pore.

Just over a year ago, I got married at New York City Hall. Every race and religion, gender and sexuality were present and the officiant was a young Sino-American lady.

All that and an old Scot with his bus pass and bride to be. A great day for us and epitomising all that’s good about America. It’s also the America of the future.

READ MORE: All UK politicians must fight Donald Trump’s foul racism – leader comment

READ MORE: Welcome Donald Trump? We’d much rather it was President John McCain – Scotsman leader comment

For the majority of those aged under 15 in the USA are now non-white. With continuing immigration, especially from Asia, that’s a trend that’s only going to increase. Even Trump’s beloved wall can’t stop it. As throughout America’s history, new migrants are spreading out and moving inland from New York and the coasts, even if no longer in covered wagons.

The country’s bigger and better than the bigot that currently presides over it.

Trump won’t last for ever and a New America is being born, more in the image of those young women than him. It’s not going to be easy for them or for us but change it will do and for the better.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4966276.1563430752!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966276.1563430752!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Donald Trump holds a 'Made In America' product showcase at the White House (Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump holds a 'Made In America' product showcase at the White House (Picture: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4966276.1563430752!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"6044347161001"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/this-is-what-the-area-51-meme-is-really-all-about-laura-waddell-1-4966607","id":"1.4966607","articleHeadline": "This is what the Area 51 meme is really all about – Laura Waddell","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563426000000 ,"articleLead": "

In some ways, the recent Area 51 meme is only the latest 90s fad to come full circle and return, like tattoo necklaces and tie-dye. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, a Facebook event to storm Area 51 (“they can’t stop all of us”) has gone viral and is the current reference du jour online.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966605.1563378249!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A sign for a motel on the Extraterrestrial Highway in Rachel, Nevada, near the mysterious Area 51 military base (AP Photo/Laura Rauch)"} ,"articleBody": "

Those who’ve clicked attend on the attempted liberation of aliens within talk about what they’re going to do with “my alien” afterwards; a cipher for reacting to current events and just chilling out with a benevolent green pal.

The top Twitter result reads “My alien who I rescued from Area 51 sitting with me as I go through my 8th breakdown of the day not knowing what to do because they don’t know what emotions are” with a gif of a confused-looking woman. It’s weird, confessional, and funny – one big in-joke.

READ MORE: How artists can defeat the politics of hate – Laura Waddell

READ MORE: Donald Trump cleared? Don’t be so sure – Laura Waddell

But the parallels between the Area 51 meme and one of the top stories in America today, migrant camps, are glaring. An attempt to storm a security facility and liberate those within?

The anti-incarceration feelings are not subtle. Aliens have always been an anti-authority interest, steeped in suspicion of what is being covered up and withheld from citizens. It’s no wonder they’re back.

It’s easier to joke about aliens than it is to confront reality. Like much of the surreal currency the internet trades in, the Area 51 meme is dissolution of real life, a fantasy thousands of people are role-playing.

Meme culture (the trading of surreal, funny images and jokes, riffing off each other and creative with language) has sprung up at a time young people feel alienated from a society where it’s more difficult to gain the financial footholds of earlier generations and current affairs are spiralling downwards.

At its bleakest, there’s the feeling, well, why not look at idiotic pictures of aliens online all night, because little else matters?

But they also contain latent feelings of freedom to live as we please, and a desire for others to do so. Go forth, Area 51-ers.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4966605.1563378249!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966605.1563378249!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A sign for a motel on the Extraterrestrial Highway in Rachel, Nevada, near the mysterious Area 51 military base (AP Photo/Laura Rauch)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A sign for a motel on the Extraterrestrial Highway in Rachel, Nevada, near the mysterious Area 51 military base (AP Photo/Laura Rauch)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4966605.1563378249!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/democracy-eu-style-a-single-candidate-who-only-just-wins-bill-jamieson-1-4966393","id":"1.4966393","articleHeadline": "Democracy, EU-style: A single candidate who only just wins – Bill Jamieson","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563426000000 ,"articleLead": "

Bored rigid by the drawn-out Conservative leadership election battle? Then let’s raise a cheer for the triumph of Ursula von der Leyen.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966392.1563374169!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ursula von der Leyen speaks at the European Parliament (Picture: Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty)"} ,"articleBody": "

She scraped through the vote of MEPs in Strasbourg to become the President-elect of the European Commission.

In the ballot of MEPs, in which her name was the only name on the ballot paper, she was approved by 383 votes to 327, with 22 abstentions and a single void ballot.

This was just nine votes ahead of the threshold of 374 required to be approved – but nearly 40 votes short of the total that the jovial Jean-Claude Juncker received five years ago.

READ MORE: MEPs back Leyen as first female president of European Commission

READ MORE: Boris Johnson: Scots Tories’ ‘Operation Arse’ ends in surrender – leader comment

How ironic that she should win by a slim majority of just 52 per cent of participating MEPs. A familiar percentage? Indeed so.

It is the same as the ‘yes’ vote in the UK’s 2016 referendum on membership of the European Union.

Clearly, a second vote may be needed as the MEPs “clearly didn’t know what they were voting for”.

Less clear cut – even if Conservative front-runner Boris Johnson wins the party leadership by a thumping majority – is the resulting outcome.

A combination of Conservative backbench dissenters and a by-election loss could cut the UK Government’s majority to just two, making an early general election most likely.

Perhaps, after all, the Brussels approach to leadership selection has its merits.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4966392.1563374169!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966392.1563374169!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Ursula von der Leyen speaks at the European Parliament (Picture: Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ursula von der Leyen speaks at the European Parliament (Picture: Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4966392.1563374169!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/nazanin-zaghari-ratcliffe-transferred-to-iranian-mental-ward-1-4966097","id":"1.4966097","articleHeadline": "Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe 'transferred to Iranian mental ward'","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563366328000 ,"articleLead": "

A British-Iranian woman jailed in Iran has been transferred to a hospital mental ward, her husband said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966096.1563366326!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe transferred to mental ward"} ,"articleBody": "

Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, 40, was arrested at Tehran's Imam Khomeini airport while travelling with their young daughter in April 2016 and sentenced to five years in prison after being accused of spying, a charge she vehemently denies.

Her husband Richard Ratcliffe said she was transferred from Evin prison on Monday to the mental ward of Iman Khomeini hospital, in Tehran, where she is being held under the control of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard.

Her father said he visited the hospital on Tuesday but was not allowed to see his daughter and that she has not been allowed to contact her family.

Before being transferred, Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe told relatives: \"I was healthy and happy when I came to Iran to see my parents.

\"Three and a bit years later and I am admitted to a mental health clinic.

\"Look at me now, I ended up in an asylum. It should be an embarrassment.

\"Prison is getting harder and harder for me. I hate being played in the middle of a political game. I just hate it.\"

In a press release, the Free Nazanin Campaign said it is not known what treatment she is receiving or how long she is expected to remain in hospital.

The transfer comes after Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe went on hunger strike for 15 days last month in protest at her \"unfair imprisonment\".

Mr Ratcliffe also did not eat for the period in solidarity with his wife as he camped on the pavement outside the Iranian Embassy in London.

The couple's five-year-old daughter Gabriella has stayed in Iran with her grandparents since her since her mother's arrest.

Mr Ratcliffe said: \"Nazanin hoped that her hunger strike would move the Iranian authorities, and it clearly has.

\"Hopefully her transfer to hospital means that she is getting treatment and care, despite my distrust of just what pressures can happen behind closed doors. It is unnerving when we don't know what is going on.\"

\"I am glad her dad has been down there to keep vigil outside.

\"Mental hospital has its worries at the best of times - but particularly when kept isolated and under the control of the Revolutionary Guard.\"

\"Even now it still seems like games of power and control are being played by the Iranian authorities - even at the point of hospitalisation.

\"We hope again this is the beginning of the end. And yet, we were also here last summer.

\"We will be following up with the new prime minister whenever that is decided to ensure he takes personal responsibility for Nazanin's case.\"

At the end of the dual hunger strike, Mr Ratcliffe said he believed the protest had been successful in raising the profile of his wife's case, with more than 100 MPs coming to show support to him in person, including Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Earlier this year, Foreign Secretary and Tory leadership hopeful Jeremy Hunt granted Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe diplomatic protection in a bid to resolve her case.

In a 2017 gaffe, Boris Johnson, his rival to become prime minister, said that Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe was in Iran \"teaching people journalism\" - despite her family's insistence she was there to visit relatives.

He has repeatedly said the responsibility for her continued detention lies with the Revolutionary Guard.

Ellie Kennedy, Amnesty International UK's individuals at risk campaigner, said: \"Yet again, the fear must be that the Iranian authorities are playing games with Nazanin's health and well-being.

\"The fact that this has been done without her family's involvement suggests the real motive may be more to do with exerting pressure on Britain, rather than providing Nazanin with treatment.

\"We know from other cases, that the Iranian prison authorities will sometimes use a range of pressuring techniques with prisoners, often designed to coerce false confessions or sometimes simply to punish them further.

\"And sometimes using prisoners as pawns in political battles.

\"After all she and her family have been through, the time really has come for the Tehran authorities to bring this to an end, to release her and let her travel back to the UK with her daughter Gabriella.\"

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@scotsman.com" ,"author": "PA Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4966096.1563366326!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966096.1563366326!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe transferred to mental ward","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe transferred to mental ward","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4966096.1563366326!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/meps-back-leyen-as-first-female-president-of-european-commission-1-4966076","id":"1.4966076","articleHeadline": "MEPs back Leyen as first female president of European Commission","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563310632000 ,"articleLead": "

Ursula von der Leyen has been approved as the first female president of the European Commission by MEPs.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4960356.1563310629!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Germany's Ursula von der Leyen with European Council President Donald Tusk. Picture: AP"} ,"articleBody": "

The German defence minister was confirmed in the role by a European Parliament vote of 383-327, with 22 abstentions.

The move required an absolute majority under EU rules.

She was nominated by EU leaders to replace Jean-Claude Juncker as part of an overall appointments deal between nations, but still needed the backing of MEPs.

Ms von der Leyen was a last-minute candidate and many legislators were angry none of their lead candidates were selected for the top job. The secret ballot announcement came after Ms von der Leyen had clashed with Nigel Farage in the European Parliament as she said she would allow another Brexit extension beyond October 31 if there were good reasons. The in-coming commission president said she respected but regretted the UK’s decision to leave the EU.

She said: “We cannot talk about Europe without talking about our friends from the UK. For the very first time, in 2016 a member state decided to leave the EU.

“This is a serious decision, we regret it but we respect it. Since then, together with the current government of the UK, the EU has worked hard to organise the orderly departure of the UK.”

The Withdrawal Agreement negotiated with Theresa May’s administration by Michel Barnier “provides certainty where Brexit created uncertainty”, she said.

“However, I stand ready for a further extension of the withdrawal date should more time be required for a good reason.”

Tory leadership frontrunner Boris Johnson has insisted he will not shift from the October 31 deadline but his rival Jeremy Hunt has indicated he would be flexible if a deal was within reach.

Mr Farage said the European Parliament had been “humbled and humiliated” by the process which led to Ms von der Leyen’s nomination by the European Council.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4960356.1563310629!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4960356.1563310629!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Germany's Ursula von der Leyen with European Council President Donald Tusk. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Germany's Ursula von der Leyen with European Council President Donald Tusk. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4960356.1563310629!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/murder-retrial-for-woman-jailed-after-giving-birth-in-toilet-1-4966063","id":"1.4966063","articleHeadline": "Murder retrial for woman jailed after giving birth in toilet","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563308837162 ,"articleLead": "

A young woman who gave birth to a baby in an outhouse toilet in El Salvador was back in court facing a second trial for murder in a case that has drawn international attention because of the country’s highly restrictive abortion laws.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966062.1563309126!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Evelyn Beatriz Hernandez, who says she is a rape victim and had no idea she was pregnant, had already served 33 months of her 30-year sentence."} ,"articleBody": "

Evelyn Beatriz Hernandez, who says she is a rape victim and had no idea she was pregnant, had already served 33 months of her 30-year sentence when the Supreme Court overturned the ruling against her in February and ordered a new trial, with a new judge.

It is the first retrial of an abortion case in a country that aggressively pursues legal cases against women who have experienced miscarriages and obstetric emergencies, accusing them of murder.

“I want justice to be done,” Ms Hernandez said as she entered the courthouse.

“I know everything is going to be OK. My faith lies with God and my lawyers.” Ms Hernandez, 21, said she hoped for “good things, unlike what happened before, and I am innocent”.

Women’s rights advocates hope the new government of president Nayib Bukele, who took office in June, will soften the country’s stance on women’s reproductive rights, starting with an acquittal for Hernandez.

Dozens of women have been jailed in El Salvador with similar convictions.

“What Evelyn is living is the nightmare of many women in El Salvador,” said her lawyer Elizabeth Deras.

Ms Hernandez has said she recalls making her way to an outhouse in a poor, rural community in April 2016 with strong abdominal pains.

She squatted to defecate, she says, and the baby must have slid to the bottom of the septic tank.

Evelyn’s mother says she found her daughter passed out next to the makeshift toilet and hailed a pick-up truck to transport her to a hospital 30 minutes away. The fetus was 32 weeks old – nearly full term.

Forensic examiners were not able to determine whether the death occurred in the womb or in the faeces. The cause of death remains unclear.

Both women insist they did not know there was a baby in the septic tank.

“I truly did not know I was pregnant,” Ms Hernandez said. “If I had known, I would have awaited it with pride and with joy.”

Prosecutors do not believe them, though the Supreme Court accepted defence lawyers’ argument that no proof had been presented that Ms Hernandez caused the baby’s death.

The trial of Ms Hernandez was due to begin today in what looks to be the first test for women’s reproductive rights under Mr Bukele, who is young and has expressed disdain for all forms of discrimination.

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@scotsman.com" ,"author": "PA Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4966062.1563309126!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966062.1563309126!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Evelyn Beatriz Hernandez, who says she is a rape victim and had no idea she was pregnant, had already served 33 months of her 30-year sentence.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Evelyn Beatriz Hernandez, who says she is a rape victim and had no idea she was pregnant, had already served 33 months of her 30-year sentence.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4966062.1563309126!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/michael-collins-centre-stage-for-apollo-11-moon-rocket-anniversary-1-4966059","id":"1.4966059","articleHeadline": "Michael Collins centre stage for Apollo 11 moon rocket anniversary","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563308296000 ,"articleLead": "

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins returned to the exact spot where he flew to the moon 50 years ago – and this time he had the spotlight all to himself.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966058.1563308293!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Astronaut Michael Collins, right, speaks to Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana at Launch Complex 39A, about the moments leading up to launch at 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969, and what it was like to be part of the the first mission to land on the moon. (Frank Michaux/NASA via AP)"} ,"articleBody": "

At Nasa’s invitation, Collins yesterday spent the golden anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission launch at Kennedy Space Centre’s Launch Complex 39A in Florida.

He marked the precise moment – 9:32am on 16 July 1969 – that their Saturn V rocket departed on humanity’s first moon landing.

Fellow astronaut Buzz Aldrin, the only other surviving crew member, had been due to attend, but cancelled at the last minute.

Mission commander Neil Armstrong, who rounded out the crew on that fateful mission and took the first lunar footsteps, was also absent, having died in 2012.

Collins said he wished Aldrin and Armstrong could have shared the moment at the pad.

It was “a wonderful feeling to be back”, the 88-year-old astronaut said.

“There was a difference this time,” he said. “I want to turn and ask Neil a question and maybe tell Buzz Aldrin something, and of course, I’m here by myself.”

Aldrin, 89, had cited a legal fight with his family and disagreements over the direction of a foundation named in his honour in missing a similar event at Kennedy Space Centre in July last year. During the mission itself, Collins had remained in lunar orbit tending to Columbia, the mother ship, while Armstrong and Aldrin landed in the Eagle on 20 July 1969.

The pair spent two hours walking on the Moon’s grey, dusty lunar surface. Collins recalled of the launch: “Apollo 11 was serious business, we crew felt the weight of the world on our shoulders.

We knew that everybody would be looking at us, friend or foe.”

After the countdown, the crew members were lifted into the sky by 7.5 million pounds of thrust.

His return yesterday kicked off a week of celebrations marking each day of Apollo 11’s eight-day voyage.

At the Air and Space Museum in Washington, the spacesuit that Armstrong wore is back on display in mint condition.

On hand for the unveiling were US vice-president Mike Pence, Nasa chief Jim Bridenstine and Armstrong’s son Rick.

A fundraising campaign took just five days to raise the $500,000 (£402,800) needed for the restoration.

In Huntsville, Alabama, where the Saturn V was developed, thousands of model rockets were launched simultaneously, commemorating the moment the Apollo 11 crew blasted off for the moon.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Marcia Dunn"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4966058.1563308293!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966058.1563308293!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Astronaut Michael Collins, right, speaks to Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana at Launch Complex 39A, about the moments leading up to launch at 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969, and what it was like to be part of the the first mission to land on the moon. (Frank Michaux/NASA via AP)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Astronaut Michael Collins, right, speaks to Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana at Launch Complex 39A, about the moments leading up to launch at 9:32 a.m. on July 16, 1969, and what it was like to be part of the the first mission to land on the moon. (Frank Michaux/NASA via AP)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4966058.1563308293!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/three-dead-as-building-collapses-in-mumbai-1-4966035","id":"1.4966035","articleHeadline": "Three dead as building collapses in Mumbai","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563302230000 ,"articleLead": "

A four-storey residential building has collapsed in Mumbai, India’s financial and entertainment capital, killing at least three people.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966048.1563304271!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Indian National Disaster Response Force and Indian fire brigade personnel rescue a survivor after a building collapsed in Mumbai on July 16, 2019. - Two people were killed and more than 40 trapped under the rubble after a building collapsed as heavy monsoon rains lashed India's financial capital Mumbai on July 16, officials said, the second such tragedy in two weeks. (Photo by PUNIT PARANJPE / AFP)PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Rescuers are looking for several others feared trapped in the rubble. Fire official Ashok Talpade said dozens of rescuers were at the site in Dongri, a crowded residential section of Mumbai, where they pulled out eight people alive and rushed them to hospital. They included one child who was allowed to go home after being treated, he said.

The building was in a congested area, making it difficult to send in earth-moving machines, Mr Talpade said, adding that police were using sniffer dogs in their rescue operation and people removed rubble with their 
hands.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4966048.1563304271!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4966048.1563304271!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Indian National Disaster Response Force and Indian fire brigade personnel rescue a survivor after a building collapsed in Mumbai on July 16, 2019. - Two people were killed and more than 40 trapped under the rubble after a building collapsed as heavy monsoon rains lashed India's financial capital Mumbai on July 16, officials said, the second such tragedy in two weeks. (Photo by PUNIT PARANJPE / AFP)PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Indian National Disaster Response Force and Indian fire brigade personnel rescue a survivor after a building collapsed in Mumbai on July 16, 2019. - Two people were killed and more than 40 trapped under the rubble after a building collapsed as heavy monsoon rains lashed India's financial capital Mumbai on July 16, officials said, the second such tragedy in two weeks. (Photo by PUNIT PARANJPE / AFP)PUNIT PARANJPE/AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4966048.1563304271!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/us-president-donald-trump-i-don-t-have-a-racist-bone-in-my-body-1-4965986","id":"1.4965986","articleHeadline": "US President Donald Trump: I don't have a racist bone in my body","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563294800749 ,"articleLead": "

US President Donald Trump has insisted his tweets suggesting four Democratic congresswomen return to their countries \"were not racist\".

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965985.1563294989!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mr Trump alleged again on Tuesday that the women, who strongly oppose his policies and comments, in reality "hate our country". Picture: Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

He also appealed to fellow Republicans to \"not show weakness\" and to resist a House resolution condemning his words.

\"I don't have a Racist bone in my body!\" Mr Trump exclaimed on Twitter, a day after declaring that \"many people agree\" with his assessment of the four politicians.

\"Those Tweets were NOT Racist,\" Mr Trump wrote amid a continued backlash to his weekend tweets that the progressive women \"go back\" to their \"broken and crime-infested\" countries.

The tweets, which have been widely denounced as racist, were directed at Representatives Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib.

All are American citizens, and three of the four were born in the US.

Mr Trump alleged again on Tuesday that the women, who strongly oppose his policies and comments, in reality \"hate our country\".

The four politicians fired back late on Monday, condemning what they called \"xenophobic bigoted remarks\" and renewing calls for Democrats to begin impeachment proceedings.

The episode served notice that Mr Trump is willing to again rely on incendiary rhetoric on issues of race and immigration to preserve his political base in the lead-up to the 2020 election.

He shrugged off the criticism.

\"It doesn't concern me because many people agree with me,\" Mr Trump said on Monday at the White House.

\"A lot of people love it, by the way.\"

At the Capitol, there was near unanimous condemnation from Democrats and a rumble of discontent from a subset of Republicans, but notably not from the party's congressional leaders.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who said Mr Trump's campaign slogan truly means he wants to \"make America white again\", announced on Monday that the House would vote on a resolution condemning his new comments.

The resolution \"strongly condemns\" Mr Trump's \"racist comments\" and says they \"have legitimised and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of colour\".

In response, Mr Trump tweeted anew on Tuesday about the four congresswomen: \"Why isn't the House voting to rebuke the filthy and hate laced things they have said? Because they are the Radical Left, and the Democrats are afraid to take them on. Sad!\"

Republican Senator Mitt Romney, the party's White House nominee in 2012 and now one of the president's most vocal Republican critics, said on Monday that Mr Trump's comments were \"destructive, demeaning, and disunifying\".

READ MORE - Virgin Holidays bans packages which promote activities with dolphins and whales
Mr Trump dug in.

\"If you're not happy in the US, if you're complaining all the time, you can leave, you can leave right now,\" he said.

His words may have been partly meant to widen the divides within the House Democratic caucus, which has been riven by internal debate over how best to oppose his policies.

And while Mr Trump's attacks brought Democrats together in defence of their colleagues, his allies noted he was also having some success in making the progressive politicians the face of their party.

The Republican president questioned whether Democrats should \"want to wrap\" themselves around this group of four people as he recited a list of the quartet's most controversial statements.

\"Nancy Pelosi tried to push them away, but now they are forever wedded to the Democrat Party,\" he wrote on Tuesday, adding: \"See you in 2020!\"

At a news conference with her three colleagues, Ms Pressley referred to Mr Trump as \"the occupant of our White House\" instead of president.

\"He does not embody the grace, the empathy, the compassion, the integrity that that office requires and that the American people deserve,\" she said, encouraging people to \"not take the bait\".

Ms Pressley said Mr Trump's comments were \"a disruptive distraction from the issues of care, concern and consequence to the American people - prescription drug prices, affordable housing, healthcare\".

Ms Omar, a naturalised US citizen born in Somalia, accused him of \"openly violating\" the constitution and sounded the call for impeachment proceedings.

Ms Ocasio-Cortez said Mr Trump \"does not know how to defend his policies and so what he does is attack us personally\".

The Senate's top Democrat Chuck Schumer said his party would also try to force a vote in the Republican-controlled chamber.

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4965985.1563294989!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965985.1563294989!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Mr Trump alleged again on Tuesday that the women, who strongly oppose his policies and comments, in reality "hate our country". Picture: Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mr Trump alleged again on Tuesday that the women, who strongly oppose his policies and comments, in reality "hate our country". Picture: Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4965985.1563294989!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/angus-robertson-loud-shrill-racist-dogwhistle-from-donald-trump-1-4965344","id":"1.4965344","articleHeadline": "Angus Robertson: Loud shrill racist dogwhistle from Donald Trump","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563264934000 ,"articleLead": "

The United States was founded as a nation of immigrants. The New York Statue of Liberty was the first sight of the New World for immigrants from far and wide who were attracted by the American dream of opportunity, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965342.1563264930!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump at Trump Turnberry (Picture: John Devlin)"} ,"articleBody": "

That is as true for the current US President as it is for most others in the United States. Donald Trump is the grandson of a 16-year-old German immigrant barber, Friedrich Trump, and is the son of Scottish domestic worker Mary Anne MacLeod who emigrated to the USA from Lewis.

None of his grandparents, and only one of his grandparents, was born in the United States or spoke English as their mother tongue. That is a typical American story.

What then can possibly explain his online attack on four congresswomen who “originally came from countries whose governments are a complete and total catastrophe”, before suggesting they “go back”?

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon slams Donald Trump over president’s ‘go back’ comments

READ MORE: UK ambassador says Trump pulled out of Iran deal in an ‘act of vandalism’

The women – Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rashida Tlaib, Ayanna Pressley, and Ilhan Omar – are all part of the new intake of Democratic representatives in Congress. Ms Ocasio-Cortez was born in New York, only 12 miles away from the hospital where Mr Trump himself was born. Only one of the four was born outside the USA, but all four are Congresswomen of colour.

It’s hard to conclude that the tweets were anything other than a loud shrill racist dogwhistle.

Sadly it’s a tune we’ve come used to hearing from Mr Tump, and it will not make America great again.

Unfortunately, he looks set to be soon joined by Boris Johnson as a premier prepared to play the racist tune. We all deserve better.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ANGUS ROBERTSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4965342.1563264930!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965342.1563264930!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Donald Trump at Trump Turnberry (Picture: John Devlin)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump at Trump Turnberry (Picture: John Devlin)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4965342.1563264930!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"5750681308001"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/all-uk-politicians-must-fight-donald-trump-s-foul-racism-leader-comment-1-4965238","id":"1.4965238","articleHeadline": "All UK politicians must fight Donald Trump’s foul racism – leader comment","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563253200000 ,"articleLead": "

Donald Trump has confirmed what was already clear – he is a racist. Anyone who cannot see this is deluding themselves or is a racist trying to defend one of their own.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4956150.1563214165!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "US President Donald Trump is a racist (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)"} ,"articleBody": "

Last year, the US President responded to protests by American footballers, who knelt during the national anthem to highlight police shootings of African Americans and racism in the US in general, by saying “you have to stand proudly for the national anthem or you shouldn’t be playing, you shouldn’t be there. Maybe you shouldn’t be in the country”. Now Trump has told four US congresswomen of colour to “go back” to the countries “from which they came”.

Telling people of ethnic minorities to “go home” is one of the defining acts of a racist.

Given multiple other examples of his bigoted attitudes, if anyone still thinks Trump is not a racist, then frankly they are deluding themselves. Or, more worryingly, they are racists attempting to hide the fact that one of their own is now the so-called ‘Leader of the Free World’ and make the expression of such abhorrent racist views acceptable in public discourse.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon slams Donald Trump over president’s ‘go back’ comments

READ MORE: Leader comment: A denunciation of Donald Trump

In the UK, his latest remarks were condemned by both Nicola Sturgeon and Theresa May, two leaders with little in common standing shoulder to shoulder on this issue. May described the comments as “completely unacceptable”, while Sturgeon said they were “not OK” and that “diplomatic politeness should not stop us saying so, loudly and clearly”.

In the US, many journalists have shied away from describing Trump as a racist, but there is now a sense that the dam has broken. A Los Angeles Times editorial was headlined “Trump is Truly America’s Bigot-in-Chief”; CNN wrote of his “racist rant”; an op-ed in the New York Times by Charles M Blow was headlined “Trump’s tweets prove that he is a raging racist”; the Boston Globe’s report noted Trump’s “long history of making racist remarks”.

However, leading US Republicans have remained disgracefully silent on the subject, a profound lack of judgement and basic morality that will hopefully come back to haunt them.

Even if all this is taking place an ocean away, Scottish and British politicians must not take the same stance. Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt should both listen to Ruth Davidson and demonstrate that they agree with May.

It is clear there are some, like former Trump adviser Steve Bannon, who are working to ensure it spreads around the world, but the diseased politics of Trump cannot be allowed to infect the UK.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4956150.1563214165!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4956150.1563214165!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "US President Donald Trump is a racist (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "US President Donald Trump is a racist (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4956150.1563214165!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/iran-nuclear-deal-not-yet-dead-declares-jeremy-hunt-1-4965245","id":"1.4965245","articleHeadline": "Iran nuclear deal ‘not yet dead’, declares Jeremy Hunt","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563216314000 ,"articleLead": "

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt has insisted that the Iran nuclear deal is not yet dead.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965244.1563216311!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "President Hassan Rouhani. AFP/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

The Tory leadership contender said there was a “small window” of hope for preventing the international agreement aimed at stopping Tehran gaining nuclear weapons from unravelling.

Speaking yesterday on his way into a Brussels meeting of EU foreign ministers on the issue, Mr Hunt said of the agreement: “Well, it isn’t dead yet. And we are totally committed to keeping the Middle East denuclearised. If Iran acquires nuclear weapons, then other countries in the region will acquire nuclear weapons.

“It becomes a very, very toxic and dangerous situation.

“We are looking to find a way to preserve the nuclear deal.

“Iran is still a good year away from developing a nuclear weapon.

“We think there is still some closing, but small window to keep the deal alive, and that’s what I’m here to talk about.

“What we are looking for is to give Iran a way out of this so that they can get back into compliance with that nuclear deal.”

The comments came as the US urged European allies to take a tougher stance on Iran after US president Donald Trump pulled America out of the nuclear deal with Tehran.

Gordon Sondland, the US ambassador to the EU, said: “I think that the time for reflection is over.

“I think it’s time to act and, by acting, I mean that our European friends should join the US in unequivocally condemning Iran’s actions with respect to their malign activities, not just in the Strait of Hormuz, but throughout the world, and bring them back to the table to discuss a comprehensive negotiation over all of their activities, including currently being the world’s lead state sponsor of terror, plotting attacks in Europe, their missile development programme and their general Middle East aggression.”

On BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Mr Sondland dismissed as “complete nonsense” an assessment by Sir Kim Darroch that Mr Trump decided to pull out of the Iran nuclear deal in an act of spite because it was agreed by his predecessor Barack Obama.

Sir Kim resigned as UK ambassador to Washington after his sensitive diplomatic dispatches were leaked. Mr Sondland said Mr Trump’s approach to the Iran deal had been “very, very thoughtful”.

Mr Hunt’s attendance at the EU summit comes after he offered to help secure the release of the Iranian supertanker Grace 1, held in Gibraltar after being detained in an operation involving British Royal Marines.

In a telephone call with Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif on Saturday, Mr Hunt sought to reassure him the vessel was intercepted over suspicions it was carrying oil to Syria – and not because it was Iranian.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4965244.1563216311!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965244.1563216311!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "President Hassan Rouhani. AFP/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "President Hassan Rouhani. AFP/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4965244.1563216311!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/new-ebola-fear-as-deadly-virus-spreads-to-city-of-two-million-1-4965236","id":"1.4965236","articleHeadline": "New Ebola fear as deadly virus spreads to city of two million","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563214036000 ,"articleLead": "

The Democratic Republic of Congo has confirmed an Ebola case in Goma, marking the first time the virus has reached the city of more than two million people since the epidemic began nearly a year ago.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965235.1563214033!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Health workers wearing protective suits tend to to an Ebola victim kept in an isolation cube in Beni, Congo DRC. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)"} ,"articleBody": "

The virus arrived after a pastor, despite feeling sick for several days, boarded a bus from Butembo traveling to eastern Congo’s largest city. Only upon arrival at his destination did anyone suspect he had the deadly and infectious virus.

The preacher managed to pass three different health checkpoints along the way, aimed at stopping those who are sick with Ebola.

The health ministry said the man who had arrived earlier on Sunday in the regional capital had been quickly transported to an Ebola treatment centre.

After the case was confirmed the head of the World Health Organisation (WHO)said he would reconvene the UN agency’s expert committee to assess whether or not the outbreak should be declared a global emergency.

At a meeting convened in Geneva by WHO yesterday, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said the spread of Ebola to Goma was a potential “game-changer”.

He said the development was one WHO and Congolese officials had been prepared for however, but described the situation as one of the most complex humanitarian emergencies ever faced.

Authorities said they had tracked down all the passengers on the bus the man took to Goma from Butembo, one of the towns hardest hit by the disease.

“Because of the speed with which the patient was identified and isolated, and the identification of all the other bus passengers coming from Butembo, the risk of it spreading in the rest of the city of Goma is small,” the health ministry said in a statement.

The virus has killed more than 1,600 people in Congo and two others who returned home across the border to neighbouring Uganda.

Health experts have long feared that it could make its way to Goma, which is located on the Rwandan border.

The health ministries in Congo’s neighbours have been preparing for months for the possibility of cases, and frontline health workers already have been vaccinated.

Health authorities along the bus route taken by the infected pastor are carefully tracking all those he may have been in contact with in a bid to esnure the virus doesn’t spread further.

“It’s the door of this region to the rest of the world,” said Dr. Harouna Djingarey, infectious disease programme manager for the WHO regional office in eastern Congo.

“From here you can fly to go to everywhere in the world. If we don’t have the control over the contacts, some high risk contacts may fly, take a plane and go somewhere.”

Congo’s health ministry sought to reassure people late on Sunday that the situation was under control, though some already were on edge after learning about the sick pastor.

“God help us if Ebola is now in Goma,” said Baudouine Rudahigwa, 30. “My children are now on alert that they can’t greet or play with others. They are washing their hands all the time.”

The health ministry said that the pastor had preached at seven different churches during his evangelical trip to Butembo, one of the towns hardest hit by Ebola in Congo. Last Tuesday the preacher fell ill and was seen at home by a nurse before he began his bus trip to Goma.

Violent attacks against health workers and treatment facilities have greatly compromised efforts to combat the epidemic in Butembo.

Health teams have been unable to access violent areas to vaccinate people at risk of infection and to bring infected patients into isolation, and have faced attacks from angry residents.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4965235.1563214033!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4965235.1563214033!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Health workers wearing protective suits tend to to an Ebola victim kept in an isolation cube in Beni, Congo DRC. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Health workers wearing protective suits tend to to an Ebola victim kept in an isolation cube in Beni, Congo DRC. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4965235.1563214033!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/theme-park-ride-snaps-in-half-killing-two-people-in-front-of-horrified-onlookers-1-4964873","id":"1.4964873","articleHeadline": "Theme park ride snaps in half killing two people in front of horrified onlookers","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563213680876 ,"articleLead": "A pendulum ride at a theme park snapped with dozens onboard - killing two people.","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4964870.1563188729!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Onlookers were horrified after the incident. Picture: SWNS"} ,"articleBody": "

Videos emerged on social media showing the ride swing back and forward before the huge metal arm breaks off, with the ride crashing to the ground.

The ring of seats at the bottom of the metal arm smashed into the main frame of the ride.

Later clips show horrified onlookers trying to free those left trapped in their seats on the ride at Balvatika amusement park in Ahmedabad in Gujarat, India.

READ MORE - Police stop four children who stole SUV and drive it 600 miles down the Australian coast

Sources said two were killed "instantly" while at least 29 were injured during the accident at around 5pm on Sunday (July 14).

A local source said: "The Ahmedabad Municipal Commissioner confirmed two deaths and said that the rest of the injured were rushed to the L.G hospital immediately after the crash took place.

"The injured are still being treated because the surgeons were pressed into action with the immediate flow of patients.

READ MORE - Worst airlines for punctuality from the UK revealed

"Home Minister Pradip Sinh Jadeja also visited the injured at the hospital and are in constant touch with the doctors to keep an eye on the update of the patients."

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4964870.1563188729!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4964870.1563188729!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Onlookers were horrified after the incident. Picture: SWNS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Onlookers were horrified after the incident. Picture: SWNS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4964870.1563188729!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4964871.1563188731!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4964871.1563188731!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The ring of seats at the bottom of the metal arm smashed into the main frame of the ride, before hitting the ground. Picture: SWNS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The ring of seats at the bottom of the metal arm smashed into the main frame of the ride, before hitting the ground. Picture: SWNS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4964871.1563188731!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4964872.1563188732!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4964872.1563188732!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Later clips show horrified onlookers trying to free those left trapped in their seats. Picture: SWNS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Later clips show horrified onlookers trying to free those left trapped in their seats. Picture: SWNS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4964872.1563188732!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/moon-landing-can-inspire-great-leap-required-to-save-planet-christine-jardine-1-4964255","id":"1.4964255","articleHeadline": "Moon landing can inspire ‘great leap’ required to save planet – Christine Jardine","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563187088000 ,"articleLead": "

The Apollo moon missions confirmed that humans have an almost infinite capacity for invention and achievement, writes Christine Jardine.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4964254.1563184167!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Astronaut Neil Armstrong is seen reflected in the helmet visor of Buzz Aldrin on the surface of the moon (Picture: Neil Armstrong/Nasa via AP)"} ,"articleBody": "

At some point this week, I shall probably just go outside and look at the moon. Not because of any lunar fascination or astronomical hobby.

But because it will be exactly 50 years since my dad and I looked at it in wonder at what human ingenuity had just achieved.

Looking back, I can’t actually remember if it was beautiful and clear or the night sky was thick with cloud. I just remember the feeling that it was special. That up there, an unimaginable distance away, on the surface of the moon, were Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin.

Fifty years ago tomorrow, 16 July, 1969, the launch of Apollo 11 from Cape Kennedy had seemed to me the start of an amazing adventure.

It was only years later that I appreciated that for many of my parents’ generation, it was the ultimate fulfilment of John F Kennedy’s promise to explore the stars and send a man safely to the moon and back by the end of the decade.

That generation had lived through World War II as children, endured the fear and tension of the Cuban missile crisis as young parents and the grief of lost opportunities with the assassinations of the Kennedy brothers and Martin Luther King.

But now they had this, ultimate achievement.

So I had been allowed to bring blankets down onto the sofa to share this historic event with my parents. This was a night that only the Queen’s coronation and possibly the 1966 World Cup final would ever match as a communal TV watching experience.

But this was also something more. This first, all night, live broadcast by both the BBC and ITV was something akin to witnessing Columbus arrive in the Americas. The world watched, waited and felt every second of the strain.

Half a century later, if I close my eyes I can still imagine that strange beep and crackly sound link through the final seconds of the descent as Armstrong searched for a safe place to land before he had too little fuel and would be forced to abort.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon must show JFK’s vision in climate change fight – Dr Richard Dixon

READ MORE: How moon landing conspiracy theories began and why they persist today – Professor Peter Knight

And then the spontaneous cheering and hugging with relief at the words that everyone instantly recognised would echo down through history. The Eagle had landed.

In my childish enthusiasm, I expected that the two men who had just travelled more than 200,000 miles and risked everything for science would just pop on their space suits and hop out into the night.

It was, of course, several hours and a snooze later, at 3.56am that Neil Armstrong emerged to take that giant leap for mankind.

It is almost impossible now to convey the excitement and expectation that it invoked. It seemed that the stars, space travel and the discovery of new worlds was at our fingertips.

In my childhood universe, it was all anyone talked about from that launch on 16 July until their safe return ten days later and much longer.

I was so captivated by the stars that, along with a friend from my primary school class, I set up an astronomy club. There were only two of us, but we took it very seriously.

Years later on a visit to the Kennedy Space Centre in Florida with my husband and my then tiny daughter, I marvelled at the size of the Saturn 5 rockets that had propelled the Apollo missions and the contrast with the cramped conditions in which they had travelled.

My fascination with all things astronomical did not last into secondary school as the waning of my interest matched the decline in the public’s following of the space programme.

I couldn’t tell you now without checking how many space missions actually landed or which was the last Apollo (it was 17). And I had to look it up to discover that there have been eight successful Mars landings.

Of course, I remember the heightened tension of watching the safe return of Apollo 13 in a drama that even the world’s best movie makers couldn’t quite recapture.

And the images of the two Space Shuttles that were lost are seared on my brain.

But, looking back, the thing I feel most is a sense of loss. Going out to look at the moon that night, I was captivated by the idea that people had actually travelled to that tiny blot in the sky. If Nasa could do that what was next? Maybe by the end of the century people would be going to Mars? Space travel could be commonplace. New worlds would be conquered.

The world has moved on enough since then for us to dare to ask now whether Neil Armstrong’s “small step” onto the surface of the moon was as great a leap as we expected. What, if any, of the promise of that mission has been realised?

Just recently someone I know scoffed at the very suggestion that man had actually been to the moon.

“It was all staged,” she laughed. And she was serious. I felt sorry for her.

You see the answer to that question about the great leap is yes. It was.

Those missions ultimately brought CAT scans, water purification, memory foam, equipment used to cut victims out of vehicles, and so many other things.

But more importantly they gave us confirmation that humans have an almost infinite capacity for invention and achievement.

Our planet currently faces a challenge that will demand all the passion, experimental science and technological advance we can find to save it from the damage we have done.

Fifty years on, Neil Armstrong’s small step onto the moon should give us the belief that if we have the will, we can.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4964254.1563184167!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4964254.1563184167!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Astronaut Neil Armstrong is seen reflected in the helmet visor of Buzz Aldrin on the surface of the moon (Picture: Neil Armstrong/Nasa via AP)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Astronaut Neil Armstrong is seen reflected in the helmet visor of Buzz Aldrin on the surface of the moon (Picture: Neil Armstrong/Nasa via AP)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4964254.1563184167!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/police-stop-four-children-who-stole-suv-and-drove-it-600-miles-down-australian-coast-1-4964848","id":"1.4964848","articleHeadline": "Police stop four children who stole SUV and drove it 600 miles down Australian coast","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1563186935879 ,"articleLead": "

Four children aged 10 to 14 packed fishing rods in a parent's SUV, left a farewell note then drove more than 600 miles down the Australian east coast before they were stopped by police the next day after two fuel thefts and one aborted pursuit.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4964847.1563187139!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The children are suspected of failing to pay for fuel at Outback gas stations in the Queensland town of Banana and the New South Wales town of Warialda, police said."} ,"articleBody": "

When the children were stopped by police near Grafton in New South Wales state at 10:40 p.m. Sunday, they locked the doors and refused to get out, Acting Police Inspector Darren Williams said.

A police officer used a baton to break a window of the 2004 Nissan Patrol, which had been reported stolen by worried parents, Williams said.

Police were not sure which child or children drove or why they left Rockhampton in Queensland state on Saturday. The children are a 14-year-old boy, two 13-year-old boys and a 10-year-old girl.

Williams said they possibly shared the driving.

\"It's a long way, in excess of 600 miles from Rockhampton down to Grafton. I couldn't imagine one person actually driving all that way in two days,\" Williams told reporters.

The children are suspected of failing to pay for fuel at Outback gas stations in the Queensland town of Banana and the New South Wales town of Warialda, police said.

They were also chased by police in the New South Wales town of Glen Innes, where a 13-year-old was suspected to be driving, Williams said.

\"There was a short pursuit up there with the Highway Patrol and due to the age of the driver and the road conditions, that was terminated by the Highway Patrol officers ... and the general duties police that were involved,\" he said.

The 14-year-old lived in Grafton, which might have been the children's destination, Williams said.

Banana Truck Stop cashier Harry White said the SUV drove off without paying for diesel at 4:35 a.m. Sunday. He estimated that the children must have left Rockhampton around midnight. Banana is a town of a few hundred people that grows no bananas and is named after a dun-coloured bull.

White said the theft involved 82 litres of diesel worth about 120 Australian dollars.

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He was not working at the time but said he watched closed-circuit TV footage and was struck by the short stature of the driver, who didn't stand as tall as the SUV's door. Police said all four range from 150 centimetres (5 feet) tall to 160 centimetres (5 feet, 4 inches) tall.

The driver behaved casually as he filled the car, then spoke to a passenger before hanging up the gas pump, White said.

\"He turned around to his mate or passenger in the car, had a small conversation which I assume was: `Hey mate, get ready, we're getting out of here,' and that's when he put it in the bowser and got in his car and shut the door and took off,\" White said.

A Queensland police statement said the children had taken cash with them from Rockhampton and one of the 13-year-olds had \"left a note to his family indicating he was leaving.\"

Police have yet to interview the children because they cannot be questioned without a parent or guardian being present. Williams said they will be charged, but did not list the alleged offences.

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Williams did not know if the children were related or how they knew each other.

Schools are closed in New South Wales for the midyear vacation, while the school vacation ended in Queensland on Monday.

Drivers must be at least 17 years old in Queensland to apply for a license.

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4964847.1563187139!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4964847.1563187139!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The children are suspected of failing to pay for fuel at Outback gas stations in the Queensland town of Banana and the New South Wales town of Warialda, police said.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The children are suspected of failing to pay for fuel at Outback gas stations in the Queensland town of Banana and the New South Wales town of Warialda, police said.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4964847.1563187139!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}