{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"world","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/several-injured-and-shooter-killed-in-wisconsin-shooting-1-4802593","id":"1.4802593","articleHeadline": "Several injured and shooter killed in Wisconsin shooting","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1537428447000 ,"articleLead": "

Authorities said they still don’t know why an employee at a US software company in Wisconsin went in to his office with a pistol and extra ammunition and began firing on his colleagues, seriously injuring several, before he was fatally shot by police.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4802592.1537428443!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A woman is escorted from the scene of the shooting at a software company in Middleton, Wis. Picture: Steve Apps/Wisconsin State Journal via AP"} ,"articleBody": "

Middleton police chief Chuck Foulke said the shooting happened Wednesday morning at WTS Paradigm. Officers were alerted to an active-shooter situation at 10:26 a.m. and arrived to find a man armed with a semi-automatic pistol and extra ammunition.

The man fired at officers before he was shot, before later dying at a Madison hospital.

Foulke said four officers fired their weapons within eight minutes of getting the call, preventing more bloodshed.

He said: “I think a lot less people were injured or killed because police officers went in and neutralized the shooter.”

Foulke released few details about the suspect: that he was an employee of WTS Paradigm and lived in nearby Madison.

The chief said he didn’t know if victims were targeted, adding that investigators were following all leads.

The police chief added: “We have reason to believe the suspect was heavily armed with a lot of extra ammunition, a lot of extra magazines.”

Judy Lahmers, a business analyst at WTS Paradigm, said she was working at her desk when she heard what sounded “like somebody was dropping boards on the ground, really loud.”

Lahmers said she ran out of the building and hid behind a car.

She said the building’s glass entrance door was shattered.

“I’m not looking back, I’m running as fast as I can. You just wonder, `Do you hide or do you run?”’ she told The Associated Press.

She said she knew one co-worker had been grazed by a bullet but was OK. She didn’t have any other information about the shooting but said it was “totally unexpected. We’re all software people. We have a good group.”

WTS Paradigm Marketing Manager Ryan Mayrand said in a statement Wednesday evening that the company was “shocked and heartbroken” and was working to set up counseling for workers. He asked the media to respect the privacy of the workers, particularly those who were among the victims.

University Hospital in Madison confirmed Wednesday evening that it was still treating three victims from the shooting, saying one was in critical condition and two were in serious condition.

Police conducted a secondary search of the office building after the shooting to ensure there were no more victims or suspects - and officers discovered some people still hiding in the building, which also houses Esker Software.

Gabe Geib, a customer advocate at Esker Software, said he was working at his desk when he heard what “sounded like claps.” He said he then saw people running away from the building at “full sprint.”

“We knew at that point that something was going down. A ton of people were running across the street right in front of us,” he said.

Geib said he and his colleagues were still huddled in their cafeteria, away from windows, more than an hour after the shooting.

Jeff Greene, who also works at Esker, said police told those gathered in the cafeteria to go to a nearby hotel to make a statement about what they saw.

Three yellow school buses full of more than 100 people, including witnesses, were unloaded at a hotel about 5 miles (8 kilometers) from the office building. Some people hugged as they were reunited with loved ones. Others stopped to pet a dog that had been brought by someone picking up a worker.

WTS Paradigm makes software for the building products industry. A Wisconsin State Journal profile from 2014 listed company employment at about 145 employees and noted the company was looking to move to a larger location at the time.

The company’s website was down Wednesday.

A shopping center next to the building was temporarily put on lockdown at the direction of police.

Middleton is about 90 miles (145 kilometers) west of Milwaukee.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4802592.1537428443!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4802592.1537428443!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A woman is escorted from the scene of the shooting at a software company in Middleton, Wis. Picture: Steve Apps/Wisconsin State Journal via AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A woman is escorted from the scene of the shooting at a software company in Middleton, Wis. Picture: Steve Apps/Wisconsin State Journal via AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4802592.1537428443!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/catherine-gee-shocked-by-blue-planet-everyone-can-do-their-bit-to-protect-the-world-1-4802331","id":"1.4802331","articleHeadline": "Catherine Gee: Shocked by Blue Planet? Everyone can do their bit to protect the world","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1537368933000 ,"articleLead": "

Authenticity is very much in the news, and rightly so. Whether it’s ‘fake news’, double standards or promises that are never kept, trust seems to be at an all-time low.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4802330.1537368929!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Plastic pollution in the sea. Picture by Blue Planet 2, BBC."} ,"articleBody": "

To achieve real change, not only do we have to change what we think, but we must change what we do. Beliefs matter, of that there is no doubt, but actions matter much more, and the public are increasingly intolerant of anyone or any organisation that says one thing and does another.

It’s the same with the United Nations Sustainable Development goals – 17 global goals that were set out to ­protect the health of our ­planet, reduce poverty and address gender equality. The first months and years since their adoption at the United Nations in 2015 have seen some impressive steps taken by governments, businesses and people across the globe. We can be proud that Scotland has been at the forefront of this international progress. Scotland was one of the first countries in the world to sign up to adopt the global goals. Since then it has gone even further and linked its own national outcomes with them.

That sounds like a great start, but what does that mean for us as individuals? As we approach Sustainable Development Goals week (22-29 September) it’s time for us to think seriously about how we embed these goals into how we live and work – the UN agreement is not just a set of ­principles to live by, it sets out ­global targets that must be achieved by 2030.

For example, global goal 12 – “responsible consumption and ­production” – focuses on sustainable business practices and consumer behaviour. This may sound very ­general and perhaps unachievable. But if we look at it a bit closer, it is formal recognition that we need to change the way we behave in our everyday lives and that the current path we are on is unsustainable.

That means, in practical terms, we all need to start thinking, about what steps we’re going to take to deliver this improvement. It’s no longer about talking the talk, it’s about walking the walk. We all need to play a part, not just for global goal 12, but as many as possible.

What does this look like for us at Keep Scotland Beautiful? In 2016, we fully aligned our activities to the 17 global goals and identified those we can make the most direct contribution to. Every organisation, large and small can and should align their work to the global goals – it’s easier than it sounds. By using the global goals as a framework for your business strategy, your organisation can be more sustainable. Everyone’s business will touch them somewhere – and it’s time to stop and look at how and where. You may already be contributing to the global goals in some way without realising it. It’s not about taking huge action – small changes can achieve a lot, even more so if it’s done collectively. It’s about our combined efforts.

This is not just a task for businesses or organisations: this is a job for us as individuals also. We all know the ­areas of our life where we can live more sustainably. How many of us are now having second thoughts before taking the easy option on a takeaway coffee cup or a paper ­napkin? How many of us dispose of our litter casually without regard to the consequences?

Another example, global goal 14 is about “life below water” and reducing marine pollution. We all saw Blue Planet II and were shocked by the impact of litter following river courses to the oceans. We’ve changed our perceptions. Have we changed our behaviour?

It is time to accelerate that change. To do that, we need to make it personal. Find out what global goals will mean for you, your employer or your business. You may be surprised about what you are already achieving.

Or why not consider joining the SDG Scotland Network – an active network open to anyone who wants to be part of making a difference ­collectively.

Above all, let’s make it authentic. Let’s move on from verbal commitments to changing the way we live and work and truly live sustainably.

Find out more about our work at www.keepscotlandbeautiful.org

Catherine Gee, director, Keep Scotland Beautiful.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Catherine Gee"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4802330.1537368929!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4802330.1537368929!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Plastic pollution in the sea. Picture by Blue Planet 2, BBC.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Plastic pollution in the sea. Picture by Blue Planet 2, BBC.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4802330.1537368929!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/sport/golf/top-woman-golfer-murdered-on-course-near-her-us-college-1-4801954","id":"1.4801954","articleHeadline": "Top woman golfer murdered on course near her US college","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1537333221000 ,"articleLead": "

The golfing world has been left in a state of shock after one of the game’s top young prospects was murdered on a course in the United States.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4801953.1537305543!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "After Spain's Celia Barquin Arozamena's body was found on a US golf course, Collin Daniel Richards, was charged with her murder. Picture: AP"} ,"articleBody": "

Celia Barquin Arozamena, a 22-year-old Spaniard who won the European Ladies’ Amateur Championship in July, was found a short distance away from her unattended golf bag at Coldwater Golf Links in Iowa early on Monday.

A 22-year-old man, Collin Daniel Richards, has been charged with murdering Barquin Arozamena, who was a student at Iowa State University.

“We are all devastated,” Iowa State head women’s golf coach, Christie Martens, said in a story posted on the team’s website. “Celia was a beautiful person who was loved by all her team-mates and friends.

“She loved Iowa State and was an outstanding representative for our school. We will never forget her competitive drive to be the best and her passion for life.”

The news was greeted with dismay by leading golfers around the world, including current European No 1 Tommy Fleetwood.

“I’ve always grown up thinking a golf course is the safest place you can be,” wrote last year’s Race to Dubai winner on Twitter. “Where is safe these days?”

Catriona Matthew, Europe’s Solheim Cup captain, described Barquin Arozamena’s murder as “devastating news” while fellow Scot Michele Thomson said: “This is so sad”.

That sentiment was shared in social media messages from various golfing bodies, including the St Andews-based R&A and Scottish Golf.

In a statement, the police said they had determined that Barquin Arozamena had died following an assault.

“This is a tragic and senseless loss of a talented young woman and an acclaimed student athlete,” said Iowa State’s president, Dr Wendy Wintersteen.

“We mourn with her family and friends in Spain, her team-mates here and all who knew her. On behalf of the entire Cyclone family, I extend our deep condolences to Celia’s family and her many friends and team-mates at Iowa State. We are deeply saddened.”

Barquin’s victory in the European Ladies’ Amateur in Slovakia had secured her an invitation to next year’s Women’s British Open at Woburn. In August, she advanced to Stage II of the LPGA Tour Qualifying Tournament.

She ended her Iowa State career (2015-18) with her fourth-straight NCAA Regional appearance and earned All-Big 12 Team honours for the third time (2015, 2016, 2018), one of only two players in college history to accomplish the feat.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4801953.1537305543!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4801953.1537305543!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "After Spain's Celia Barquin Arozamena's body was found on a US golf course, Collin Daniel Richards, was charged with her murder. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "After Spain's Celia Barquin Arozamena's body was found on a US golf course, Collin Daniel Richards, was charged with her murder. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4801953.1537305543!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/bert-and-ernie-writer-ends-speculation-over-whether-sesame-street-duo-are-gay-1-4801860","id":"1.4801860","articleHeadline": "Bert and Ernie writer ends speculation over whether Sesame Street duo are gay","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1537287502000 ,"articleLead": "

FOR decades, speculation has raged over the exact nature of Bert and Ernie’s extremely close relationship on long-running children’s TV show Sesame Street.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4801858.1537287498!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Bert and Ernie are popular characters. Picture: Wikicommons /"} ,"articleBody": "

And now the writer behind the iconic characters has revealed their is truth behind persistent rumours the pair are gay.

Mark Saltzman, who joined the children’s television show in 1984, says he did indeed write Bert and Ernie as a same sex couple.

The popular characters, who share an apartment at 123 Sesame Street, bathe together, share a bedroom and bicker a lot and have long fascinated more curious, adult viewers of the show for pre-schoolers.

Mr Saltzman said the pair reflected his own relationship at that time.

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He added: “I remember one time a preschooler [in San Francisco] turned to her mum and asked, ‘are Bert and Ernie lovers?’ and that, coming from a preschooler, was fun.

“That got passed around, and everyone had their chuckle and went back to it.

“And I always felt that without a huge agenda, when I was writing Bert and Ernie, they were. I didn’t have any other way to contextualise them.”

Sesame Street is known for tackling difficult and confusing social issues with child-friendly storylines, such as Elmo’s mother losing her job in the recession and having to rein in spending on toys to make ends meet, and his father going off to war.


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A Nigerian version of the show incorporated a Muppet with HIV.

Sesame Street had previously described Bert and Ernie as “best friends”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4801858.1537287498!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4801858.1537287498!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Bert and Ernie are popular characters. Picture: Wikicommons /","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Bert and Ernie are popular characters. Picture: Wikicommons /","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4801858.1537287498!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/alice-konig-and-kate-walker-education-is-the-key-to-peace-help-us-beat-the-book-burners-1-4800992","id":"1.4800992","articleHeadline": "Alice Knig and Kate Walker: Education is the key to peace – help us beat the book-burners","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1537246906000 ,"articleLead": "

Shelby Foote, an American novelist and historian, ­suggested that a university is a group of buildings gathered around a library. In Mosul, Iraq, this was indeed the case. In fact, the ­university library there was not only the beating heart of the University of Mosul but of the city itself.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800989.1537178103!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mosul University Library, once one of the largest in the Middle East and North Africa, was destroyed by ISIS"} ,"articleBody": "

Built in 1967, Mosul University Library was the largest in northern Iraq and one of the largest in the ­Middle East and North Africa. The space once housed more than one million books—600,000 Arabic-language materials and 400,000 resources in English and other ­languages—for 150 university departments ­covering diverse fields of knowledge.

The collection also included periodicals dating back to 1700CE, government publications from the founding of the modern Iraqi state in 1921, and versions of the Quran from the 19th century. Foreign culture corners gave students and researchers the chance to explore diverse literary traditions and ways of life in other countries.

As a house of learning and knowledge at the centre of the university, the library was among the first institutions targeted by ISIS after their occupation of Mosul in 2014.

They would later burn it completely, destroying nearly all of its contents and the building’s structure.

Following the liberation of Mosul from ISIS, around 50,000 students and university staff are now ­struggling to complete their academic work, not to mention other ­independent researchers from Mosul, nearby cities and other parts of Iraq.

The RSE Young Academy of Scotland is helping to change this. In 2016 we welcomed four at-risk academic and refugee members, among them Dr Alaa Hamdon, a geologist from the University of Mosul who ­specialises in disaster management.

He had left Mosul in January 2015 and secured a position at the University of Aberdeen. When he returned to Iraq in 2017, he sought to help his city and university begin their slow recovery by founding a campaign called Mosul Book Bridge (mosulbookbridge.org) to bring the plight of the university library to the world’s attention and to generate support to restock and rebuild it.

With the help of Dr Caroline Sandes, an archaeologist at University College London with expertise in post-conflict urban regeneration, he enlisted the support of the UK-based charity Book Aid International (bookaid.org) and through them organised a major shipment of brand new academic books, carefully chosen to complement the degree courses now resuming at the university. Further shipments from Book Aid International are planned for the coming year.

These book donations are a major step forward for the university library, but Dr Hamdon has other ambitions for Mosul Book Bridge too. With the ongoing support of Dr Sandes and the help of a number of Young Academy of Scotland ­members, he is now working to secure IT equipment and electronic journals for the ­university library, much needed given how limited the space for hard copy books is in the temporary library buildings.

There are also plans to support the restoration of the city of Mosul’s main public library, also affected by the conflict, and to establish some book buses to travel the city bringing books to its people.

The challenges facing Iraq as it responds to ongoing security concerns are immense. Meanwhile, ­however, the lives of its citizens ­continue. The majority of the population in Iraq is aged under 24 and it is these same young people who will shape the country’s future.

By calling for international support, Mosul Book Bridge argues that ­education is the key to realising a peaceful and prosperous future for Iraq. It believes that students in Mosul should have access to the same up-to-date resources that students in Scotland can access in their libraries if they are to overcome the tests that lie ahead.

A modern, well-stocked Mosul ­University Library can serve as a site for the free exchange of ideas among students and the wider citizenry, an invaluable asset as the city rebuilds.

In extending our help and friendship to our academic colleague in Iraq, members of the Young Academy of Scotland and the Mosul Book Bridge Team are keen to ­promote wider collaboration between UK institutions to support the city, region and country in their recovery.

Alice König and Kate Walker, ­members of the RSE Young Academy of Scotland.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Alice Knig and Kate Walker"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4800989.1537178103!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800989.1537178103!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Mosul University Library, once one of the largest in the Middle East and North Africa, was destroyed by ISIS","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mosul University Library, once one of the largest in the Middle East and North Africa, was destroyed by ISIS","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4800989.1537178103!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4800990.1537178105!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800990.1537178105!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Alice Konig","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Alice Konig","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4800990.1537178105!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4800991.1537178108!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800991.1537178108!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Kate Walker","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Kate Walker","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4800991.1537178108!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/man-dies-after-shark-attack-off-cape-cod-1-4800662","id":"1.4800662","articleHeadline": "Man dies after shark attack off Cape Cod","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1537045588000 ,"articleLead": "

A man boogie boarding off a Cape Cod beach was attacked by a shark on Saturday and died later at a hospital, becoming the state’s first shark attack fatality in more than 80 years.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800661.1537045583!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Two people look out at the shore after a reported shark attack at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet, Mass. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)"} ,"articleBody": "

The 26-year-old man from Revere succumbed to his injuries following the attack in the waters off Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet at around noon, Wellfleet Police Lt. Michael Hurley said.

Life-saving measures were attempted on the beach before the man was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis, where he was pronounced dead, State Police spokesman David Procopio said. The beach has been closed to swimming.

The attack is the first fatal shark attack in Massachusetts since 1936, and the second shark attack this season.

A 61-year-old New York man was severely injured Aug. 15 after fighting off a shark off Truro, about 4 miles north of Saturday’s attack. He’s currently recovering in a Boston hospital.

“Today is just keeping everyone out of water,” Hurley said. “There’ll be a determination later about what the town wants to do with the beaches going forward.”

Beachgoers said the Wellfleet beach is popular with surfers, and with sunny skies and warm temperatures Saturday it was busy, even though the summer season was over and lifeguards were no longer on watch.

Joe Booth, a local fisherman and surfer, said he was on shore when he saw the man and his friend boogie boarding when the attack happened.

He said he saw the man kick aggressively kick something behind him and a flicker of a tail from the water. He realized what was happening when the friend came ashore dragging his injured friend.

“I was that guy on the beach screaming, `Shark, shark!” Booth said. “It was like right out of that movie Jaws. This has turned into Amity Island real quick out here.”

Booth said others on the beach attempted to make a tourniquet while others frantically called 911.

Hayley Williamson, a Cape Cod resident and former lifeguard who was on the beach at the time, was in disbelief after the man, who police have not yet identified was rushed in an ambulance.

“We’ve been surfing all morning right here and they were just further down,” she said of the two boogie boarders. “Right spot, wrong time, I guess.”

A Cape Cod politician said officials who did not more aggressive action against sharks bore some responsibility for the fatal attack. Barnstable County Commissioner Ron Beaty said he had warned something like this could happen.

“It is my personal belief that the responsibility for this horrible shark attack rests squarely upon the shoulders of the aforementioned officials for their utter lack of attention and inaction regarding the growing shark problem on Cape Cod of the last few years,” he said.

The family of the victim was notified of the death but his name was not released, Procopio said.

The state’s last shark attack fatality was on July 25, 1936, when 16-year-old Joseph Troy Jr. was bitten in waters off Mattapoisett.

Troy, of Boston’s Dorchester neighborhood, was visiting an uncle and was swimming about 50 feet offshore when the shark attacked.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4800661.1537045583!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800661.1537045583!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Two people look out at the shore after a reported shark attack at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet, Mass. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Two people look out at the shore after a reported shark attack at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet, Mass. (AP Photo/Susan Haigh)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4800661.1537045583!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/flash-flood-fears-as-storm-florence-batters-us-1-4800425","id":"1.4800425","articleHeadline": "Flash flood fears as Storm Florence batters US","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1537014336000 ,"articleLead": "

Storm Florence has battered the eastern US coast with non-stop rain, surging seawater and howling winds.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800423.1537014330!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Volunteers from all over North Carolina help rescue residents from their flooded homes during Hurricane Florence September 14, 2018 in New Bern, North Carolina. Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

Some towns have received more than two feet of rain from Florence, and forecasters warned that drenching rains totalling up to three-and-a-half feet of water could trigger epic flooding well inland through early next week.

At least four people have died, and authorities fear the toll will go higher as the tropical storm crawls westwards across South Carolina.

North Carolina Gov Roy Cooper called Florence an “uninvited brute” that could wipe out entire communities as it grinds its way across land.

“The fact is this storm is deadly and we know we are days away from an ending,” Gov Cooper said.

With tropical storm-force winds swirling 350 miles wide, Florence continued deluging the Carolinas on Saturday morning after pushing surging seas far ashore.

Rescue crews used boats to carry more than 360 people from rising water in the river town of New Bern, North Carolina, while many of their neighbours awaited help. Dozens more were pulled from a collapsed hotel.

Florence flattened trees, damaged buildings and crumpled roads. The storm knocked out power to nearly 930,000 homes and businesses, and the number could keep rising.

A mother and baby were killed when a tree fell on a house, according to a tweet from Wilmington police.

A 77-year-old man was apparently knocked down by the wind and died after going out to check on his hunting dogs, Lenoir County authorities said. The governor’s office said a man was electrocuted while trying to connect extension leads in the rain.

Storm surges - the bulge of ocean water pushed ashore by the hurricane - were as high as 10 feet.

Florence peaked at a terrifying Category 4 with top winds of 140 mph over warm ocean water before making landfall as a Category 1 hurricane at 7:15am at Wrightsville Beach, a few miles east of Wilmington and not far from the South Carolina line.

Morehead City, North Carolina, had received 23 inches of rain by Friday night, and forecasters warned on Saturday morning that parts of the Carolinas could get up to 15 inches more.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4800423.1537014330!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800423.1537014330!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Volunteers from all over North Carolina help rescue residents from their flooded homes during Hurricane Florence September 14, 2018 in New Bern, North Carolina. Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Volunteers from all over North Carolina help rescue residents from their flooded homes during Hurricane Florence September 14, 2018 in New Bern, North Carolina. Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4800423.1537014330!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4800424.1537014332!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800424.1537014332!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Florence made landfall in North Carolina as a Category 1 storm and flooding from the heavy rain is forcing hundreds of people to call for emergency rescues in the area around New Bern","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Florence made landfall in North Carolina as a Category 1 storm and flooding from the heavy rain is forcing hundreds of people to call for emergency rescues in the area around New Bern","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4800424.1537014332!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/susan-dalgety-how-hollywood-s-lies-help-expose-trump-and-the-kkk-1-4799965","id":"1.4799965","articleHeadline": "Susan Dalgety: How Hollywood’s ‘lies’ help expose Trump and the KKK","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536987600000 ,"articleLead": "

Hollywood’s fiction can hide or shine a spotlight on reality of life in the US, writes Susan Dalgety.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799964.1536923663!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "In Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman, the magic of a filmmaker at the height of his powers tells a truth that is almost too much to bear (Picture: David Lee/Focus Features)"} ,"articleBody": "

Logan bounced up and down in the driver’s seat like an overgrown Tigger with an obligatory hipster beard.

“Welcome to Hollywood,” he declaimed in his best actor’s voice, “where we lie to you for a living!”

And, with a loud “hee-haw”, we were off in our larger-than-life golf cart.

The “we” were 13 wide-eyed tourists, from as far afield as France and upstate New York, who had each paid $65 for a tour of Warner Brothers Studio.

Logan was our enthusiastic guide who, in the course of two hours, romped through the history of movies, from the Jazz Singer to Harry Potter. He even threw in some television.

“Any fans of the Gilmore Girls here?” he shouted, delighted when someone at the back squealed “me”. I Googled them later.

“The four Warner brothers bought this lot in 1923 and built a nickelodeon theatre to show movies,” explained Logan as we entered a big shed, or sound studio as it is called in the business. “But by 1927 they had run out of movies to show, so they decided to make their own. The Jazz Singer was their first, the rest is history,” he shouted into his mike, with all the subtlety of Groucho Marx. “Look at this vintage globe,” Logan enthused in the props department. “It was used in Casablanca.”

I perked up. “And recently it starred in the Marvel movies, Thor and Dr Strange,” he added.

Suddenly, the globe lost its glamour, and it was just a large papier mache ball, decorated with a vivid map of the world.

Everything in La La Land is fake. “This was the hospital in ER,” shouted Logan as we passed the façade of a large, grey Art Deco building. “It was also the Gotham City Hall of Records in the Batman movies.”

“Raindrops are too small for the big screen,” he explained. “So, we make our own rain. Each drop is five times bigger than real ones, so they can be captured on film.”

“Don’t forget to visit Central Perk for a coffee,” he exhorted at the end of the tour. “Everyone thinks Friends was filmed in New York,” he laughed gleefully. “But it wasn’t. It was made here. Here in Hollywood!”

READ MORE: Susan Dalgety: Trump town is a city of dreams – and nightmares

Strictly speaking, the Warner Brothers studio is in Burbank. Hollywood is seven miles south and downtown Los Angeles is a further seven miles.

Greater Los Angeles has a population of around 18 million and sprawls across 34,000 square miles. Everyone, it seems, is in the “business”.

“My wife is a writer, screenplays,” explained Alan, our Spanish-Colombian-Venezuelan-American taxi driver. “And I have just applied to DreamWorks for a job, I do computer graphics. If I get it, my dream will have come true,” he added, without a hint of embarrassment. Dreams are what built LA.

“We have over a hundred movie people living here,” said Steven, the garrulous owner of our campsite. “One of our residents has been here since 1947, Frank Garvey. Lovely old man. Used to play with Tony Bennett.”

With rents starting at around $2,000 a month, little wonder that even well-paid film folk, like make-up artists or session musicians, choose to live in a mobile home on the edge of the city instead of in a downtown apartment.

Only movie stars can afford Venice Beach or Beverley Hills. Or the new moguls of LA, the tech billionaires.

And it seems, owners of 10-acre RV parks. “Land sells for $4 million an acre in LA,” Steve told us, nonchalantly. “Home Depot wants to buy our site, but I have said no.”

He laughed as I croaked, “$40 million ...”

California is the world’s fifth biggest economy, worth a staggering $2.7 trillion per year. Its GDP is bigger than the UK or France.

It is proud of its multi-cultural identity. A third of San Francisco’s population was born outside of America. There are more Hispanic people (39.1 per cent) than white (37.2 per cent) living in California.

READ MORE: Susan Dalgety: America’s Last Stand? Irn-Bru in Montana is sign of hope

It is an aggressively progressive state, with the highest sales-tax and wealth-tax rates in the country, and the revenue is used to fund large public spending programmes.

The Hollywood version of California is a place where the sun shines all the time, where everyone, black, white, gay, straight, young, old, lives together in harmony.

A place where the best minds from across the globe are creating a brave new world, where there is an app for everything, and everything is an app.

But real life is not the movies. One in three of all Americans who receive welfare live in California. It has the highest poverty rate in the country – 20 per cent, caused largely by the high cost of housing. Homelessness is endemic. And there is a growing divide between those with careers in the lucrative entertainment and tech industries, around a third, and the 50 per cent of the population who work in the low-wage service sector. The sun does shine all the time however. Relentlessly.

As we wandered along Hollywood Boulevard, choked with tourists searching for their favourite star on the sidewalk, we decided we had to see a movie in Hollywood.

There is nothing quite like a cinema on a Wednesday afternoon, and just like our multiplex back home, the state-of the-art movie theatre on Sunset Boulevard was almost empty. Five of us watched Spike Lee’s latest epic ‘BlacKkKlansman’ in a room built for five hundred.

As the magic of a film maker at the height of his powers drew us in, we were transported back to 1970s Colorado Springs, where racism was as ubiquitous as flares and a young white supremacist, David Duke, was busy re-branding the Ku Klu Klan.

“America First,” chanted his hooded men. “I want to make it great again,” intoned Duke.

As the film ended on a high note, we were, shockingly, pulled back into Trump’s America. The murderous violence of last year’s Charlottesville riots flashed on to the big screen.

Neo Nazis and the Ku Klux Klan screamed their vile hatred as a young woman, Heather Heyer, was mown down and killed on live TV by a Dodge Charger, allegedly driven by a white supremacist.

And to the evident delight of David Duke, still head of the Klan 40-odd years later, President Trump’s voice then boomed out, “there was blame on both sides”.

Hollywood. The place where people are paid handsomely to lie to us. Only sometimes, a movie can tell us a truth that is almost too much to bear. America, are you listening?

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Susan Dalgety"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4799964.1536923663!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799964.1536923663!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "In Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman, the magic of a filmmaker at the height of his powers tells a truth that is almost too much to bear (Picture: David Lee/Focus Features)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "In Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman, the magic of a filmmaker at the height of his powers tells a truth that is almost too much to bear (Picture: David Lee/Focus Features)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4799964.1536923663!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/brian-wilson-spain-isn-t-a-fascist-dictatorship-suppressing-catalonia-1-4799972","id":"1.4799972","articleHeadline": "Brian Wilson: Spain isn’t a fascist dictatorship suppressing Catalonia","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536930740000 ,"articleLead": "

Theresa May marked World Suicide Prevention Day with a tweet which said: “Seventeen per cent of people will experience suicidal thoughts in their lifetime – and if you are worried about someone, step in and ask if you can help.”

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799971.1536930737!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Glasgow University's rector, Aamer Anwar, should take a history course, says Brian Wilson (Picture: John Devlin)"} ,"articleBody": "

If Mrs May’s unexceptionable comments encouraged a single individual to think or to act, then they would have served their purpose.

Aamer Anwar, high-profile lawyer and rector of Glasgow University, thought otherwise and tweeted in response: “The irony of the leader of barbaric, twisted & evil UK Government daring to talk about suicide on World Suicide Prevention Day.”

READ MORE: Brian Wilson: There’s a sinister side to Sturgeon’s new Catalan friend

This offensive outburst was subsequently deleted in the face of hostile comment. By then, Anwar was off to Barcelona to address a Catalan Nationalist rally. Predictably, he could not see a top without going over it.

General Franco, he declared, would be “proud of modern Spain” which was behaving like a “fascist dictatorship”, using methods of “state terrorism” to suppress Catalonia. It was an incredibly insulting rant against “modern Spain” in general and Catalans who oppose independence in particular.

Someone should tell Mr Anwar that Spain is a flourishing democracy which has recently acquired a centre-left government. It has been Europe’s leading liberal reformer on an array of social issues. Its state broadcaster even gives space to rabble-rousing tourists like ... well, Mr Anwar.

He seems to think the conflict which divided Spain was based on nationality and had the cheek to use the phrase “No Pasaran” which was the cry of all Spaniards who defended besieged Madrid against the military might of Franco’s forces.

Perhaps Mr Anwar could be offered a history course at Glasgow University before he embarrasses Scotland further.

READ MORE: Catalan president hails Indyref as best citizen rights’ example

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Brian Wilson"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4799971.1536930737!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799971.1536930737!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Glasgow University's rector, Aamer Anwar, should take a history course, says Brian Wilson (Picture: John Devlin)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Glasgow University's rector, Aamer Anwar, should take a history course, says Brian Wilson (Picture: John Devlin)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4799971.1536930737!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/environment/video-incredible-hurricane-florence-weather-report-goes-viral-1-4800109","id":"1.4800109","articleHeadline": "Video: Incredible Hurricane Florence weather report goes viral","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536933519000 ,"articleLead": "

It is probably the most terrifyingly accurate weather report you’re ever likely to see.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800108.1536933515!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "editorial image"} ,"articleBody": "

A forecast by the Weather Channel, presented by meteorologist Erika Navarro, has gone viral after its impressive use of 3D graphics showed just how deadly the potential storm surge of Hurricane Florence can be.

Standing in front of a green screen, Navarro can be seen demonstrating the ultimate power of rising water levels.

With graphics depicting an intersection on a street in the American state of North Carolina, the forecaster explains what is likely to happen as the water engulfs the state’s coastline amid sound effects of wind, rain and rushing water.

“Once that water comes up to three feet, you can see it would be coming up my shins up towards my waist. This could be enough to knock you off your feet,” says Navarro.

• READ MORE: Hurricane Florence: Residents flee as Category 4 storm heads for US coast

“It could even float some cars that could be parked on the side of the roadway. This is extremely dangerous,” she adds.

The forecast shows how water levels could reach 9ft high - “through the first floor of your home into the second” - with graphics depicting floating debris and even fish in the surge water.

The video went viral with many on social media praising the Weather Channel for its use of state-of-the-art graphics.

Journalist Brian L Kahn (@blkahn) tweeted: “This @weatherchannel visualization of storm surge is an amazing and sobering use of technology to show what hurricanes like Florence can do.”

Opinion journalist Anton Daceyah (@AntonDaceyah) posted: “When #WeatherChannel techs shoot their shot for Hollywood.”

• READ MORE: Scotland’s weather: Storm Helene 80mph winds warning

Juan (@juanbuis) noted: “Smartphones have stopped innovating but fortunately the Weather Channel is out here doing some crazy s***.”

One Twitter user St Peter (@stpeteyontweety) joked: “Did the Weather Channel consult Moses on this?”

Hurricane Florence made landfall on Friday morning in Wrightsville, North Carolina bringing with it life-threatening storm surges and 90mph winds.

Forecasters said that given the storm’s size and sluggish track, it could cause enormous damage similar to what Houston, Texas, saw during Hurricane Harvey just over a year ago, with floodwaters swamping thousands of homes and businesses.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4800108.1536933515!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4800108.1536933515!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "editorial image","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "editorial image","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4800108.1536933515!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/rob-davidson-whether-it-s-scotland-or-malawi-climate-change-is-having-an-effect-on-farmers-1-4799161","id":"1.4799161","articleHeadline": "Rob Davidson: Whether it’s Scotland or Malawi, climate change is having an effect on farmers","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536901359000 ,"articleLead": "

Alena Dishoni lives ­nearly 8,000 miles away, but we have much in common. As farmers, we both depend on the climate and we can both see it is changing for the worse.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799159.1536831496!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Alena Dishoni and her children 12-year-old Amen and 10-year-old Onani"} ,"articleBody": "

Alena lives in a rural district near Lilongwe, the capital of Malawi, and she and her family are entirely dependent on the crops they grow – soy beans, ground nuts and maize – to feed themselves and to provide an income. The money Alena makes from farming means she’s able to send her two children, 12-year-old Amen and 10-year-old Onani, to school.

The trouble is, yields on Alena’s farm are dwindling. Four years ago, when the rains were better in ­Malawi, the family harvested much more but since then their yields have been going down and down, with some crops failing completely.

Alena’s biggest worry is that ­without an adequate harvest, she simply won’t have the money to send her children to school anymore. Alena and her husband both dropped out during primary school – she doesn’t want the same to happen to her kids.

“Rains are unpredictable and not sufficient,” Alena explained to Oxfam’s project staff in Malawi. “In the last growing season, there were months that we only received rains twice a month and I am worried that in the coming years or even the next growing season we won’t be able to harvest enough to eat.”

As a farm manager in Scotland, my experience is of course different in many ways, but I also have a first-hand view of the impact of climate change on our local produce.

Like Alena, I’ve been faced with increasingly unpredictable weather patterns and water shortages. In Scotland, we’re used to getting our plants growing in April ready to plant out in a warm and wet May. That’s all changed over the past few years; last year there was a six-week drought and this year the drought has gone on for even longer.

Of course, in Scotland, we have a more consistent supply of water than Alena does, but our systems simply aren’t set up to deal with ­sustained periods of drought and these can have dire consequences for our crops.

If these ‘anomalies’ become a trend then water conservation in Scotland could become a major issue as ­farmers need to access larger supplies to water their crops. Reservoirs around Edinburgh are very low just now. If we have more years like this one, we may soon reach a crisis point.

It is clear that the future of farming, whether in Scotland or ­places like Malawi, is being threatened by climate change. If we’re going to ­limit the damage, then governments around the world need to take ­decisive action now.

The Scottish Government can do just that, whilst showing strong international leadership on this issue, through the forthcoming Good Food Nation Bill and via its Climate Change Bill. To me, it seems clear that these two proposed new laws go hand-in-hand.

An obvious place to start would be to answer the calls being made to stop contributing to climate change by Stop Climate Chaos Scotland and Oxfam Scotland. For that to happen, the new Climate Change Bill needs to include a binding target of achieving zero emissions by 2050 at the latest.

It’s not an unachievable goal; in fact ideas being proposed in Scotland’s forthcoming Good Food Nation Bill could help us achieve it. We all know that agriculture is a large contributor to greenhouse gas emissions and that systemic change is needed to address this problem.

Through the Good Food Nation Bill, we have the chance to take ownership of our food supply system and to make it as sustainable and ­environmentally friendly as possible by encouraging small scale, ­integrated farming. This in turn, would help us meet our ambitions on climate change.

As Alena and I know all too well, it’s not just the future of farming on the line. Climate change is threatening people’s lives, homes and livelihood right now. The Scottish Government must do all it can to change the future so it’s fairer for everyone.

Think Scotland should stop ­contributing to climate change? Email your MSPs and ask them to take action today through http://bit.ly/OxfamScotlandClimate

Rob Davidson is the farm manager for Cyrenians. The farm is a social enterprise located just outside ­Edinburgh.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ROB DAVIDSON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4799159.1536831496!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799159.1536831496!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Alena Dishoni and her children 12-year-old Amen and 10-year-old Onani","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Alena Dishoni and her children 12-year-old Amen and 10-year-old Onani","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4799159.1536831496!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4799160.1536831497!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799160.1536831497!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Rob Davidson is the Farm Manager for Cyrenians.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Rob Davidson is the Farm Manager for Cyrenians.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4799160.1536831497!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/leader-comment-salisbury-poisoning-suspects-tell-their-tall-tale-1-4799655","id":"1.4799655","articleHeadline": "Leader comment: Salisbury poisoning suspects tell their tall tale","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536901200000 ,"articleLead": "

So, they were just two innocent tourists desperate to see Salisbury Cathedral. We can all rest easy and dismiss the nonsense spouted by the UK Government about Russian assassins or anything silly like that.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799258.1536859034!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Russian Nationals Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov have appeared in an interview on the Russian state TV channel RT. Picture: Russia Today"} ,"articleBody": "

The attempted murders of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia and the fatal poisoning of Dawn Sturgess must have had something to do with the UK’s Porton Down research facility instead, as Russia has suggested.

READ MORE: Nerve agent suspects claim they visited Salisbury as tourists

Speaking for the first time, the two Russian suspects said they would have never taken a bottle of perfume through UK customs – let alone one containing the deadly nerve agent Novichok – because it’s “kind of stupid for two straight men to carry perfume for ladies” and border staff would have immediately been suspicious.

Not that these “sports nutrition salesmen” had any reason to fear suspicious officials. And of course it’s crazy for men to have women’s perfume – they always buy their own.

And if the men were seen on CCTV in suburban Salisbury, a few minutes’ walk from the Skripals’ house, that’s just a coincidence; they weren’t to know where it was.

Aye, right.

READ MORE: Yulia Skripal: My recovery has been ‘slow and painful’

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4799258.1536859034!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799258.1536859034!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Russian Nationals Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov have appeared in an interview on the Russian state TV channel RT. Picture: Russia Today","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Russian Nationals Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov have appeared in an interview on the Russian state TV channel RT. Picture: Russia Today","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4799258.1536859034!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/sport/tennis/is-the-herald-sun-s-cartoon-of-serena-williams-racist-1-4799327","id":"1.4799327","articleHeadline": "Is the Herald Sun’s cartoon of Serena Williams racist?","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536840154000 ,"articleLead": "

A cartoon of Serena Williams has provoked a furious backlash from critics who deemed it racist and offensive.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799325.1536840150!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The original Herald Sun cartoon. Picture: Herald Sun/AP"} ,"articleBody": "


Mark Knight’s caricature of the 23-time grand slam champion’s outburst at the US Open appeared in Melbourne’s Herald Sun.

The newspaper has defended the cartoon as satire, dismissing critics as politically-correct. Williams is depicted with oversized lips, jumping on her broken tennis racket, a dummy lying on the court next to it.

Her match opponent, Naomi Osaka, who is Japanese and Haitian, is depicted as slender and blonde in the background. The cartoon has been widely criticised as “racist”.

This is why..



Reminiscent of Jim Crow era

It boils down to the fact that the cartoon “plays on historically racist ways of drawing black people,” says actress and activist Kelechi Okafor.

Many, including Ms Okafor, have compared it to imagery from the era of Jim Crow, which refers to laws and propaganda that enforced racial segregation in the US during the 19th and 20th centuries.

Lips

There has been a huge focus on Knight’s decision to draw Williams with enlarged facial features including oversized lips.

Such elements were often used in ‘Sambo’ imagery, according to Dr Joe Street, a senior lecturer in American History at Northumbria University.

‘Sambo’ is a derogatory racial term that refers to a children’s book from the late 19th century, The Story of Little Black Sambo.

Defending the cartoon, Mr Knight has said he has no knowledge of these references.

Stereotypes and slavery

Others critics have said his cartoon plays into tropes surrounding black people and their historical oppression.

“The enlarged facial features and the position of a dummy in the cartoon draws on pernicious stereotypes of African Americans as angry, childlike and in need of restraint by white masters,” says Dr Kate Dossett, associate professor of US history at the University of Leeds.

“These were the images used to justify African enslavement and racial segregation in the past; they are still used to control black lives in the present,” she says.

Misogynoir

The cartoon also highlights a particular type of bias towards black women – misogynoir.

According to writer Chante Joseph, black women in particular are often portrayed in the media as angry.

Writing for i, she says Knight has invalidated and dismissed Williams’ “genuine concerns [during the match] as blanket rage”.

“To make matters worse, he depicts Osaka, who is of Japanese and Haitian heritage heritage as a petite pale woman speaking to the umpire as he pleads with her to ‘Let [Serena] win’.”

The cartoon appeared in Herald Sun after Williams’ lost in straight sets to Naomi Osaka during the weekend’s US Open final.

Umpire Carlos Ramos warned Williams for receiving coaching from the sidelines and docked her a point for smashing her racket.

Ramos then penalised her a game.

The tennis player called the umpire a “thief” and claimed the treatment was sexist.

Cartoonist Knight defended his drawing – as did the editor of the newspaper – saying it was nothing to do with race, rather Williams’ “poor behaviour” at the match.

The publication then doubled-down on the cartoon, reprinting it on the front page with the headline ‘Welcome to PC World’.

There has been dismay over Knight’s defence. “Regardless of whether that was the cartoonist’s intention, [racist caricatures are] an important frame through which many people will understand the image – and I find it very hard to believe that Knight would not be aware of those connotations,” says Dr Tom Davies, senior lecturer in American History at the University of Sussex.

This article first featured on our sister site iNews.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "SERINA SANDHU"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4799325.1536840150!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799325.1536840150!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The original Herald Sun cartoon. Picture: Herald Sun/AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The original Herald Sun cartoon. Picture: Herald Sun/AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4799325.1536840150!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"5832964360001"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/nerve-agent-suspects-claim-they-visited-salisbury-as-tourists-1-4799259","id":"1.4799259","articleHeadline": "Nerve agent suspects claim they visited Salisbury as tourists","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536836886000 ,"articleLead": "

The prime suspects in the Salisbury nerve agent attack have claimed they visited Salisbury as tourists.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799258.1536859034!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Russian Nationals Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov have appeared in an interview on the Russian state TV channel RT. Picture: Russia Today"} ,"articleBody": "

Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov told Russian state-funded news channel RT they visited the city in Wiltshire to see Stonehenge and Old Sarum.

The pair claimed they have been left fearing for their lives after Britain pointed to their involvement and said they were officers in Russian military intelligence service the GRU.

RT editor-in-chief Margarita Simonyan said they had called her mobile because they wanted to tell their story.

In a translation from Russian, the broadcaster quoted Petrov as saying: “Well, we came there on March 2, then went to a railway station to see the timetable. We arrived in Salisbury on March 3 and tried to walk through the town, but we lasted for only half an hour because it was covered in snow.

“Of course, we went there to see Stonehenge, Old Sarum, but we couldn’t do it because there was muddy slush everywhere. The town was covered by this slush. We got wet, took the nearest train and came back (to London).”

In the men’s first interview since they were named publicly they denied carrying women’s perfume.

READ MORE: RT set to publish interview with Salisbury nerve agent suspects

UK authorities believe the pair smeared the highly toxic chemical Novichok on a door handle at the Wiltshire home of former GRU officer Sergei Skripal, leaving Mr Skripal and his daughter Yulia critically ill.

Boshirov acknowledged they may have been near Mr Skripal’s house but they did not know where it was.

President Vladimir Putin said the men had been discounted as members of his security network.

In an address to the Easter Economic Forum in Vladivostok, he said: “Of course, we looked who these people are. We know who they are, we have found them already.

“There is nothing special and nothing criminal about it, I’m telling you.”

Questioned on whether the pair were civilians, Mr Putin replied: “Of course they are civilians.”

Boshirov said his life had been turned “upside down”, according to RT.

He said: “We’re afraid of going out, we fear for ourselves, our lives and lives of our loved ones.”

Detectives believe it is likely the two suspects, thought to be aged around 40, travelled under aliases and that Petrov and Boshirov are not their real names.

Officers formally linked the attack on the Skripals to events in nearby Amesbury where Dawn Sturgess, 44, and her partner Charlie Rowley, 45, were exposed to the same nerve agent.

Ms Sturgess died in hospital in July, just over a week after the pair fell ill.

A police officer who visited the home of the Skripals shortly after the attack, Nick Bailey, was also left critically ill from exposure to the substance.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "JEMMA CREW"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4799258.1536859034!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799258.1536859034!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Russian Nationals Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov have appeared in an interview on the Russian state TV channel RT. Picture: Russia Today","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Russian Nationals Ruslan Boshirov (left) and Alexander Petrov have appeared in an interview on the Russian state TV channel RT. Picture: Russia Today","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4799258.1536859034!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/rt-set-to-publish-interview-with-salisbury-nerve-agent-suspects-1-4799148","id":"1.4799148","articleHeadline": "RT set to publish interview with Salisbury nerve agent suspects","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536830842000 ,"articleLead": "

The first interview with the prime suspects in the Salisbury nerve agent attack is expected to be broadcast by Russian state-funded news channel RT.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799147.1536830838!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Alexander Petrov (left) and Ruslan Boshirov are prime suspects in the Salisbury nerve agent attack. Picture: Metropolitan Police/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

The global news channel, funded by the Russian Federation, tweeted that the discussion with Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov would be aired “soon”.

Editor-in-chief Margarita Simonyan said the pair had called her mobile and the interview, which is in Russian, will be published later on Thursday.

On Wednesday the British Government said it stood by its assertion that the two men were officers in Russian military intelligence service the GRU, after President Vladimir Putin described them as “civilians”.

UK authorities believe the pair smeared the highly toxic chemical Novichok on a door handle at the Wiltshire home of former GRU officer Sergei Skripal, leaving Mr Skripal and his daughter Yulia critically ill.

Mr Putin said the men had been discounted as members of his security network.

READ MORE: Theresa May says Alex Salmond ‘risks being Russian propaganda tool’

In an address to the Easter Economic Forum in Vladivostok, he said: “Of course, we looked who these people are. We know who they are, we have found them already.”

He added: “There is nothing special and nothing criminal about it, I’m telling you.”

Questioned on whether the pair were civilians, he replied: “Of course they are civilians.”

The Russian president said he hoped Mr Petrov and Mr Boshirov would appear in public to dispel doubt about their true identity.

Detectives believe it is likely the two suspects, thought to be aged around 40, travelled under aliases and that Petrov and Boshirov are not their real names.

Officers formally linked the attack on the Skripals to events in nearby Amesbury where Dawn Sturgess, 44, and her partner Charlie Rowley, 45, were exposed to the same nerve agent.

Ms Sturgess died in hospital in July, just over a week after the pair fell ill.

A police officer who visited the home of the Skripals shortly after the attack, Nick Bailey, was also left critically ill from exposure to the substance.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "JEMMA CREW"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4799147.1536830838!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4799147.1536830838!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Alexander Petrov (left) and Ruslan Boshirov are prime suspects in the Salisbury nerve agent attack. Picture: Metropolitan Police/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Alexander Petrov (left) and Ruslan Boshirov are prime suspects in the Salisbury nerve agent attack. Picture: Metropolitan Police/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4799147.1536830838!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/apple-launch-biggest-and-most-expensive-iphone-yet-1-4798891","id":"1.4798891","articleHeadline": "Apple launch biggest and most expensive iPhone yet","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536781086000 ,"articleLead": "

Apple has unveiled three new iPhones, including its biggest and most expensive model yet, as the company seeks to widen the product’s appeal amid slowing sales.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4798890.1536781082!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Apple chief executive Tim Cook. Picture: Josh Edelson/Getty Images"} ,"articleBody": "

Chief executive Tim Cook showed off the Apple XS, which has a bigger screen than the one on last year’s dramatically designed model , the iPhone X.

The new XS will cost about $US1,000 (£766).

READ MORE: Learning tool helps close gap in Scotland’s maths attainment

A bigger version will be called the iPhone XS Max, which looks to be about the size of the iPhone 8 Plus, though the screen size is much larger.

This one will cost almost $US1,100 (£843), topping last year’s iPhone X, which at $US1,000 (£766) seemed jaw-dropping at the time.

As with the iPhone X, the new phone has a screen that runs from edge to edge, an effort to maximise the display without making the phone too awkward to hold. The screen needs no back light, so black would appear as truly black rather than simply dark.

This even-bigger iPhone, which will be available on 21 September in the US, with orders open the week before, represents Apple’s attempt to feed consumers’ appetite for increasingly larger screens as they rely on smartphones to watch and record video, as well as take photos wherever they are.

The iPhone X also got rid of the home button to make room for more screen and introduced facial-recognition technology to unlock the device.

By making more expensive iPhones, Apple has been able to boost its profits despite waning demand as people upgrade phones less frequently.

IPhones fetched an average price of $US724 (£555) during the April-June period, a nearly 20 per cent increase from a year earlier.

Apple also showed off a cheaper iPhone, called the iPhone XR. It has a traditional, lower-quality screen and an aluminum body. It is physically smaller than the iPhone 8 Plus, but has a bigger screen.

The cheaper phone will cost roughly $US750 (£575) and come out on 26 October. Apple also said that its next major update to its iOS operating system will come next Tuesday, followed a week later by a Mac software update.

Worldwide smartphone sales grew just 2 per cent during the second quarter of 2018, according to the research firm Gartner Inc.

During that period, which is typically slow for Apple, China’s Huawei Technologies surpassed Apple as the second-largest seller of smartphones based on Gartner’s calculations.

Samsung remained in the lead.

Apple also announced updates that push its Apple Watch further into medical device territory.

It has a larger screen and a built-in heart sensor that the company said can detect irregular heart rates and perform an electrocardiogram. The latter feature has been cleared by the US Food and Drug Administration, the company said.

These features will be available to US customers later this year, but Apple did not say when it would make it to the rest of the world.

In addition, Apple says the Series 4 Apple Watch will also be able to detect when someone falls - and can tell the difference between a trip and a fall. If it detects a fall and the user doesn’t respond in a minute, it’ll automatically call for help. This feature may be especially attractive to older people or those with elderly parents worried about falling when no one is around to help.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4798890.1536781082!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4798890.1536781082!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Apple chief executive Tim Cook. Picture: Josh Edelson/Getty Images","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Apple chief executive Tim Cook. Picture: Josh Edelson/Getty Images","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4798890.1536781082!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/hurricane-florence-residents-flee-as-category-4-storm-heads-for-us-coast-1-4798578","id":"1.4798578","articleHeadline": "Hurricane Florence: Residents flee as Category 4 storm heads for US coast","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536746880000 ,"articleLead": "

Millions of Americans are preparing for what could be one of the most catastrophic hurricanes to hit the eastern seaboard in decades.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4798577.1536746876!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Hurricane Florence heads for the US coast, as seen from the international space station. Widespread flooding and destruction is expected. Picture: NASA"} ,"articleBody": "

Hurricane Florence’s top winds dipped to 130mph on yesterday, but it remains a Category 4 storm and is expected to approach Category 5 status as it slows and strengthens over warm water off the coast of North and South Carolina.

The centre of the storm is forecast to meander tomorrow, Friday and Saturday over a stretch of coastline saturated by rising seas, inundating several states with rainfall and triggering life-threatening floods.

“Please be prepared, be careful and be SAFE!” US president Donald Trump tweeted.

Mandatory evacuations are under way for parts of three east coast states, and the mayor of Washington DC declared a state of emergency as the US capital prepares for heavy rain and flooding.

South Carolina’s governor ordered the evacuation of the state’s entire coastline yesterday and predicted that a million people would flee as major roads reverse directions.

Virginia’s governor ordered a mandatory evacuation for some residents of low-lying coastal areas, while some coastal counties in North Carolina have done the same.

North Carolina governor Roy Cooper said his state is “in the bullseye” and urged people to “get ready now”.

The centre of that bullseye may be Camp Lejeune, a sprawling Marine Corps training base. Forecast predict 20 inches of rain or more falling there, part of a wide stretch of rainfall that could see ten inches or more over much of Virginia and drench the nation’s capital. Some isolated areas could get 30 inches, forecasters said.

Florence could hit the Carolinas harder than any hurricane since Hazel packed 130mph winds in 1954.

That Category 4 storm destroyed 15,000 buildings and killed 19 people in North Carolina. In the six decades since then, many thousands of people have moved to the coast.

The storm’s first effects were already apparent on barrier islands as dangerous rip currents hit beaches and seawater flowed over a state highway – the harbinger of a storm surge that could wipe out dunes and submerge entire communities. Watches are already in effect for a storm surge that could reach up to 12ft at high tide on a stretch from Cape Fear to Cape Lookout in North Carolina, forecasters said.

A hurricane watch was in effect for Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to Virginia’s southern border, with the first hurricane-force winds arriving late tomorrow.

If Florence slows to a crawl just off the coast, it could bring torrential rain all the way into the Appalachian mountains and as far away as West Virginia, causing flash floods, mudslides and other dangerous conditions in places that do not usually get much tropical weather.

Craig Fugate, former director of the US Federal Emergency Management Agency, said: “This is going to produce heavy rainfall, and it may not move very fast. The threat will be inland, so I’m afraid, based on my experience at Fema, that the public is probably not as prepared as everybody would like.”

National Hurricane Centre director Ken Graham warned that Florence is expected to linger once onshore, downing trees, knocking out electricity and causing widespread flooding.

Mr Graham warned that the “staggering” size of the storm means its impacts will be felt far and wide.

The storm’s potential path also includes half a dozen nuclear power plants, pits holding coal-ash and other industrial waste, and numerous pig farms that store animal waste in massive open-air lagoons.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4798577.1536746876!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4798577.1536746876!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Hurricane Florence heads for the US coast, as seen from the international space station. Widespread flooding and destruction is expected. Picture: NASA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Hurricane Florence heads for the US coast, as seen from the international space station. Widespread flooding and destruction is expected. Picture: NASA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4798577.1536746876!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/funding-for-madeleine-mccann-probe-due-to-run-out-1-4798494","id":"1.4798494","articleHeadline": "Funding for Madeleine McCann probe due to run out","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536740362000 ,"articleLead": "

Speculation is growing over the future of the UK police hunt for Madeleine McCann after it emerged funding will run out at the end of the month.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4798493.1536740359!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Madeleine McCann was three when she was last seen on holiday with her parents in Portugal in May 2007. Picture: PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

The youngster was three when she was last seen on holiday with her parents in Portugal in May 2007.

Scotland Yard launched its own investigation, Operation Grange, into her disappearance in 2013 after a Portuguese inquiry failed to make any headway.

UK detectives were granted an extra £150,000 in March to continue the probe, to cover until the end of September.

READ MORE: Detectives given more cash to continue Madeleine McCann hunt

A Metropolitan Police spokesman said the force is “in dialogue regarding future funding” with the Home Office.

A Home Office spokesman said: “To date no request has been received from the Metropolitan Police Service to extend funding for Operation Grange beyond the end of September 2018.”

The department said any request for further funding by the Metropolitan Police will be “carefully considered”.

Operation Grange has cost £11.6 million so far.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "MARGARET DAVIS"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4798493.1536740359!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4798493.1536740359!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Madeleine McCann was three when she was last seen on holiday with her parents in Portugal in May 2007. Picture: PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Madeleine McCann was three when she was last seen on holiday with her parents in Portugal in May 2007. Picture: PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4798493.1536740359!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/gordon-munro-many-citizens-in-scotland-today-remember-the-other-9-11-1-4798208","id":"1.4798208","articleHeadline": "Gordon Munro: Many citizens in Scotland today remember the other 9/11","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536678087000 ,"articleLead": "

Today there are citizens in Scotland who will be subdued, reflective and sad as they remember the other September 11th. Today is the 45th anniversary of the coup against the democratically elected government of Salvador Allende in Chile.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4798207.1536678083!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Demonstrators carry a banner of Chile's late President Salvador Allende, days ahead of the 45th anniversary of the 1973 military coup that toppled him (Picture: Esteban Felix/AP)"} ,"articleBody": "

British-made Hawker Hunter jets strafed the presidential palace as the army issued an ultimatum to either resign or surrender. Allende did neither and died in the office to which he was elected, shot by troops of the army of which he was head.

In the following days, then years, terror reigned in Chile. The national football stadium was filled with political prisoners, including Victor Jara whose last words were smuggled out from the stadium after his brutal execution in front of his fellow prisoners. Those citizens now living in Scotland will remember his last lines “how hard it is to sing when I must sing of horror, horror of which I am living, horror of which I am dying”.

The caravan of death which traversed Latin America using techniques taught by the CIA left Estadio Chile and travelled throughout Latin America torturing, killing and disappearing people without mercy.

Coming here clandestinely as refugees from a war they did not seek or want, the Chilean citizens were welcomed to their new homes by citizens here. People like the Leal family received support from the National Union of Mineworkers, which made them feel welcome and diluted a hurt that is still felt especially today.

Citizens here organised the Chile Solidarity Campaign to bring attention to the coup and to support the Chilean diaspora seeking refuge here.

Christy Moore did a benefit concert at Leith town hall. Homes were found and lives rebuilt. When the SFA decided that the Scottish football national side would be the first team to play in Estadio Chile following its use as a detention and torture centre, there were citizens who protested outside the SFA HQ at Park Gardens, disgusted by the move.

READ MORE: The Scotland v Chile friendly labelled the ‘match of shame’

The writer Ariel Dorfman dedicated his essay ‘The incredible unending trial of General August Pinochet’ to not just more than 4,000 killed in Chile – of which 1,002 have no date of death inscribed on the memorial wall in Cemetario General Santiago – but also to the hundreds of thousands tortured and who are not remembered on the wall.

The memorial wall was created with a large empty space in the knowledge that names would be added and continue to be added as families of the disappeared slowly find out what happened to those taken from them.

Families and friends will think of everyone on this date and they are not alone.

In recent years, Edinburgh has held a ceilidh in memory of Victor Jara – where the guest of honour was his widow Joan Jara – to raise funds for the foundation in his name in Chile.

On the 40th anniversary of the coup, a vigil was held outside the Scottish Parliament. I hosted a night for Chilean poet and politician Pablo Neruda in Edinburgh City Chambers where the poets Ron Butlin, Michael Pedersen, Liz Lochhead, Colin Bartie, the actress Dolina McLennan and the musician William Douglas movingly interpreted his work and paid tribute to him and Victor Jara.

There are citizens in Scotland who will remember the other September 11th as they directly experienced it and cannot forget. There are citizens in this country who will remember the other September 11th as they expressed and gave solidarity to those who fled terror and torture in Chile.

We hope you too will remember the other September 11th.

Gordon Munro is Labour councillor for Leith on Edinburgh City Council

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Gordon Munro"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4798207.1536678083!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4798207.1536678083!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Demonstrators carry a banner of Chile's late President Salvador Allende, days ahead of the 45th anniversary of the 1973 military coup that toppled him (Picture: Esteban Felix/AP)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Demonstrators carry a banner of Chile's late President Salvador Allende, days ahead of the 45th anniversary of the 1973 military coup that toppled him (Picture: Esteban Felix/AP)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4798207.1536678083!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/retail/cadbury-owner-stockpiling-ingredients-in-case-of-no-deal-brexit-1-4797924","id":"1.4797924","articleHeadline": "Cadbury owner ‘stockpiling ingredients’ in case of no-deal Brexit","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536654900000 ,"articleLead": "

Cadbury owner Mondelez International has reportedly revealed it is stockpiling ingredients, chocolates and biscuits in case of a no-deal Brexit.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797923.1536654896!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mondelez International, the owner of Cadbury, revealed it is stockpiling ingredients in case of a hard Brexit. Picture: Wikimedia Commons"} ,"articleBody": "

Hubert Weber, the European boss of Mondelez, said the UK was “not self-sufficient in terms of food ingredients” and confirmed the stockpiling as part of contingency plans for a hard Brexit, according to The Times.

It marks the latest revelation over stockpiling ahead of Brexit as fears mount that the UK may fail to agree terms of its withdrawal by the Brexit deadline next March.

Mr Weber said: “Like the whole of the food and drink industry in the UK, we would prefer a good deal that allows the free flow of products, as that would have less of an impact to the UK consumer.

“However, we are also preparing for a hard Brexit and, from a buffering perspective for Mondelez, we are stocking higher levels of ingredients and finished products, although you can only do so much because of the shelf life of our products.

READ MORE: Britain considers stockpiling drugs for no-deal Brexit

“We have a contingency plan in place to manage (a hard Brexit), as the UK is not self-sufficient in terms of food ingredients, so that could be a challenge.”

He warned that shoppers may face higher prices and fewer choices if a deal is not agreed and added he wished Britain was “at a different stage (in negotiations with the EU) at this stage”.

Europe is Mondelez’s biggest global division, accounting for 40 per cent of revenue last year.

A raft of firms across the industry are said to be stockpiling and making no-deal plans.

Matt Hancock, Britain’s new Health and Social Care Secretary, said in July that officials were considering working with industry to stockpile drugs, medical devices and supplies in the event of a no-deal scenario.

Drugs giant AstraZeneca said in August that patients in the European Union may not be able to receive medicines from the UK post-Brexit if it does not “prepare well” for a no-deal scenario.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "HOLLY WILLIAMS"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4797923.1536654896!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797923.1536654896!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Mondelez International, the owner of Cadbury, revealed it is stockpiling ingredients in case of a hard Brexit. Picture: Wikimedia Commons","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Mondelez International, the owner of Cadbury, revealed it is stockpiling ingredients in case of a hard Brexit. Picture: Wikimedia Commons","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4797923.1536654896!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/darren-mcgarvey-bernie-sanders-bezos-inequality-bill-is-doomed-1-4797726","id":"1.4797726","articleHeadline": "Darren McGarvey: Bernie Sanders’ BEZOS inequality bill is doomed","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536642000000 ,"articleLead": "

US Congressman Bernie Sanders has introduced a bill – named after Amazon founder Jeff Bezos – that would force companies to pay a tax equal to the amount of benefits claimed by their workers. It’s a great idea but political centrists will kill it off, writes Darren McGarvey.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797725.1536598490!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Senator Bernie Sanders wants the US Government to impose a new tax on businesses based on the welfare payments it gives to their staff (Picture: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

The famous “old man yells at cloud” gag from The Simpsons took literal form earlier in the year when Democrat congressman Bernie Sanders used social media to call out Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos’ obscene wealth. In a tweet, Sanders wrote, “Amazon founder Jeff Bezos’ wealth increases by $275 million every single day. Meanwhile, Amazon workers have to rely on food stamps and public assistance just to survive.”

I mean, the nerve. Bernie clearly didn’t get the memo that ‘wealth creator’ Bezos earns less than most of Sanders’ colleagues on Capitol Hill, taking home a paltry $81,840 salary. Bezos wealth comes from the stock he owns in Amazon. Sorry to burst your bubble Bernie, but Bezos’ $130.8 billion net worth is tied up in shares. He only accumulates the wealth of a Bond villain for as long as the price on those shares rises. It just so happens that over the last three years it’s rocketed skyward by over 272 per cent.

Good thing Sanders didn’t run for the White House. After all, this isn’t the first of his wacky ideas. If Bernie had his way, the profit motive would be removed from health care completely, ushering in an apocalypse in which government handouts might be extended beyond weapons manufacturers and bankers, to families who currently have to bankrupt themselves to pay their children’s medical bills. Not to seem cold, but those people shouldn’t have had children if they couldn’t afford to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars for unforeseeable leukaemia treatment. Why provide universal health care to all American citizens when there’s an unimpeachable corporate class on hand to farm their bad fortune by inserting an abstraction like profit into an already complicated equation? Bloody communists.

READ MORE: Darren McGarvey: Jordan Peterson’s ideas must be countered by the left

Oh, what’s that Bernie, you’ve teamed up with a Republican to come up with an extremely creative solution to this galling wealth polarisation? One that involves imposing a 100 per cent tax on companies correlated to the amount of federal assistance received by its employees? Hang on, the bill even has an acronym? Ok, this might be more serious than I thought.

The Stop Bad Employers by Zeroing Out Subsidies (BEZOS) Act – clearly named in such a way as to make it easy for hash-head protesters to chant – would set a precedent in the American economy by billing corporations for the cost of in-work poverty. If an employee collects $1,000 in food assistance, Amazon, recently valued at $1 trillion (enough money that you could climb a quarter of the way to the moon if you stacked it up) would be taxed at $1,000 to cover the cost. Simple.

Amazon has become a poster-child for the excesses of capitalism in the neoliberal period: the systematic dismantling of worker’s rights under the guise of labour market flexibility; the abandonment of the mere concept that people should be paid enough to afford basic things like food and shelter; an ever-cosier relationship between corporate big-wigs and lawmakers which, at this point, could arguably be characterised as interchangeable; and the slow march to the cliff-edge of ecocide as everything from the oceans to the rainforest are offered as sacrificial lambs at the altar of shareholder profits. Sadly, getting serious about corporate abuse and its corrosive impact on our lives is not high on the list of centrist priorities. If the current ruptures in our political, economic and environmental systems are the cloud, the centre-ground scorn reserved for those who rightly regard the status-quo as the root cause, is the silver lining.

The BEZOS act would not only hammer Amazon, but also the other usual suspects like Walmart and McDonalds, which both depend on cheap labour to remain competitive. Walmart employees, like Amazon’s, are often dependant on food stamps and other forms of state help, like social housing and Medicaid, just to get by. According to Sanders, this means American taxpayers are hit for over $6 billion a year, effectively subsidising the same corporations that exploit every loophole in the book to avoid paying their fair share of tax.

READ MORE: Darren McGarvey: The ‘benefits’ of Universal Credit should give Tories food for thought

If there is one inarguable fact about neoliberalism, it’s that this inequality, written into the DNA of our economy, has created a fertile bed of anger and resentment – as well as a coming tidal wave of radioactive social problems – that are already threatening to undermine democracy and social order. In the UK, the political centre-ground, from where all acceptable wisdom ostensibly emerges, recently unveiled its latest two-pronged response to the crisis: a Tony Blair farewell tour followed by an onslaught of spelling and grammar shaming on Twitter which, it’s hoped, will bring the great unwashed to its collective senses.

In the centre, it seems no topic is off the table when attempting to get to the root of the problem: the vulgar tone of those apparently on the fringes; the paranoid tin-foil hat conspiracy theorists on the far left and right; and, of course, the criminal misuse of semi-colons. The only thing you’ll rarely see written about in any great depth is the dire economic status-quo from which these unpalatable movements and crisis-cults emerge.

As someone who feels the gravity of the political centre bearing down upon him, I understand the appeal of mistaking an economic system that has worked for my own career and bank account as something that should work for everyone else. There’s also the self-satisfaction that comes with being a moderate; terrible things only happen when society stupidly deviates from the third-way. Also, in the centre, a guilty conscience alone absolves one from taking any further action. it’s enough just to feel bad about how things are.

It’s on this middle-ground where a great idea like the BEZOS Act goes to die. This, despite it being an economically sound, socially just and politically intelligent response to a fundamental problem. The BEZOS Act reconciles several oppositional interests that usually prevent cross-party solutions to common problems. If the centre is where two ways of doing things are weaved together, what’s more centrist than this? It transfers the welfare burden of in-work poverty to the corporations whose low-wage business model it subsidises – instead of cutting social programs altogether. It addresses tax evasion. And, crucially, it’s something people on the right should support because, if enacted, it would cut welfare spending considerably.

It’s the sort of idea centrists claim they wish was possible, only to lament the tribal times we live in, before dismissing anything but tepid, corporation-friendly responses as unworkable utopian thinking – utopian being anything that does not demonstrate fealty to the free-market. Centrists may pride themselves in being moderate, but the impact of their flaccid and superficial politics is nothing short of extreme.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Darren McGarvey"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4797725.1536598490!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797725.1536598490!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Senator Bernie Sanders wants the US Government to impose a new tax on businesses based on the welfare payments it gives to their staff (Picture: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Senator Bernie Sanders wants the US Government to impose a new tax on businesses based on the welfare payments it gives to their staff (Picture: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4797725.1536598490!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/sweden-s-ruling-party-hits-election-low-as-far-right-grows-1-4797449","id":"1.4797449","articleHeadline": "Sweden’s ruling party hits election low as far-right grows","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536571282000 ,"articleLead": "

Voters handed Sweden’s ruling party its worst-ever election result and delivered a parallel lift to a far-right party with white supremacist roots, preliminary results showed.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797448.1536571277!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Prime minister and party leader of the Social Democrat party Stefan L�fven speaks at an election party in Stockholm, Sweden. Picture: AP"} ,"articleBody": "

After a campaign dominated by debates over immigration, the centre-left Social Democratic Party emerged with the greatest share of the vote - 28.4 per cent as the count neared completion - yet looking at holding fewer parliament seats and having its mandate to govern questioned.

The potential for an immigration backlash to result in a big boost for the far-right Sweden Democrats inspired fear among many Swedes before the election.

It received a little more than one in six votes, or 17.6 per cent. Its showing was not as strong as the one-in-five polls had predicted, but good for a third-place finish that had the party’s leader telling supporters, “We won.”

Prime Minister Stefan Lofven, who brought the Social Democrats to power in 2014, said he intended to remain in the job.

The leader of the Moderates party that came in second, Ulf Kristersson, already had called on Mr Lofven to resign and claimed the right to form Sweden’s next government.

Sounding sombre and firm, Mr Lofven told his supporters the election presented “a situation that all responsible parties must deal with,” adding that “a party with roots in Nazism” would “never ever offer anything responsible, but hatred.”

READ MORE: Lesley Riddoch: The Swedes can resist the far right

“We have a moral responsibility. We must gather all good forces. We won’t mourn, we will organise ourselves,” he said.

Final election returns were expected later in the week.

The preliminary results made it unlikely any party would secure a majority of 175 seats in the 349-seat Riksdag, Sweden’s parliament. It could take weeks or months of coalition talks before the next government is formed.

Both the left-leaning bloc led by the Social Democrats and the centre-right bloc in which the Moderates is largest of four parties have said they would refuse to consider the Sweden Democrats as a coalition partner.

Sweden - home to the Nobel prizes and militarily neutral for the better part of two centuries - has been known for its comparatively open doors to migrants and refugees.

Sunday’s general election was the first since the country of 10 million took in a record 163,000 refugees in 2015 as mass migration to Europe rose dramatically.

MR Lofven eventually said Sweden no longer could cope with the influx and immigration laws were tightened.

Like other far-right parties in Europe, the Sweden Democrats worked to soften its neo-Nazi image in the lead-up to the election.

The party symbol was switched from a flame thrower to a flower. Members known for making pro-Third Reich statements were pushed out.

It made its first mark in politics with municipal council seats in 2006, and since then slowly helped revise long-accepted social norms for what Swedes could say openly about foreigners and integration without being considered racist.

At the Swedish Democrat’s election eve rally on Saturday, party leader Jimmie Akesson criticised Mr Lofven’s government for “prioritising” the needs of new immigrants the ones of Swedish citizens.

Mr Akesson was jubilant as he addressed supporters a day later, declaring the estimated 14 parliament seats the Social Democrats picked up a victory other parties could not ignore in coalition negotiations.

“This party has increased and made the biggest gains. Everything is about us,” Mr Akesson said. “I am ready to talk with others.”

Turnout in the election was reported at 84.4 per cent, up from 83 per cent in 2014.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4797448.1536571277!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797448.1536571277!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Prime minister and party leader of the Social Democrat party Stefan L�fven speaks at an election party in Stockholm, Sweden. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Prime minister and party leader of the Social Democrat party Stefan L�fven speaks at an election party in Stockholm, Sweden. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4797448.1536571277!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/lesley-riddoch-the-swedes-can-resist-the-far-right-1-4797255","id":"1.4797255","articleHeadline": "Lesley Riddoch: The Swedes can resist the far right","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536559246000 ,"articleLead": "

Is Sweden lurching to the right?

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797254.1536508690!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Jimmie Akesson, leader of the right-wing nationalist Sweden Democrats party, votes in the Swedish general election. Picture: Getty"} ,"articleBody": "

Sunday’s elections will doubtless show a rise in support for the far-right Sweden Democrats (SD). Several opinion polls had placed them second, behind the Social Democrat Party (SAP) - Sweden’s traditional party of government - and ahead of the centre-right Moderates.

The prospect of such a political shift has made headlines across the world. Of course, every country is grappling with the same problem - public hostility to immigration in the aftermath of wars in Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan, Syria and beyond. But let’s be honest. There’s also a good deal of schadenfreude about Sweden’s predicament. This country of almost ten million people has created one of the world’s most equal societies since the Social Democrats first came to power in 1917. Whilst other countries like Britain have found it almost impossible to control or regulate capitalism, the Swedes have made big strides. As a result, their income gap is the world’s smallest; their childcare and maternity/paternity care are excellent and their elderly care is widely regarded as the best in the world. On a trip to Sweden’s southern province of Skane, industrialist and Swedish Consul to Scotland Torvald Colliander took me to see the council-run old folk’s home where his mother lived and died. He proudly showed me his own name on the application list. “In Sweden,” he told me, “the only fear is that you wont get into the council home and might have to go private instead.” Public services are that good. Consequently, private provision is rare, everyone uses the same school, doctor and dentist regardless of social background and the wealthy keep on paying tax.

So far it’s worked. The Swedes have been the living embodiment of Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett’s best-selling book; The Spirit Level, which demonstrates that everyone benefits from an equal society – including the rich. Additionally, the Swedes have the highest rates of innovation in the EU and union membership is three times higher than in Scotland.

In short, the Swedes have been at the top of every international league table for decades – provoking admiration, envy and outright hostility in almost equal measure.

In 1960, American president Eisenhower said Sweden’s welfare state had led the country into an orgy of sex, socialism and suicide. In fact, Sweden was the only country on earth to rival the GDP of post war America, so it was politically inconvenient to discover that a tiny Nordic nation was evolving a more humane Third Way between the command economy and the unfettered free market.

Some of Eisenhower’s mud stuck and over the years, politicians in less equal societies have grown weary of Sweden’s apparently effortless social and economic success. So there’s a smug wee smile now that Sweden’s suffering from an ugly outbreak of the same racism, intolerance and hostility experienced by other countries with lower standards and more wobbly moral compasses. It seems that under pressure, the Swedes react no better than anyone else. You can almost hear the collective sigh of relief from politicians, TV viewers and even activists.

But Sweden’s predicament is not quite so simple.

There is absolutely no parallel between the number of refugees and economic migrants accepted into Sweden and any other country – not in Germany and most definitely not in the UK.

In 2015, one in six people living in Sweden was born outside the country. That’s a dramatic change from the almost totally homogenous, white society that prevailed in Sweden until the 1960s. Like the other Nordic nations, the Swedes had no empire, Commonwealth or experience of different ethnicities arriving gradually as economic migrants over a century as Britain did. Instead, Swedish society changed fairly rapidly – the first influx of refugees came after the Yugoslavian conflict and then in 2014, the country accepted 80,000 mostly Syrian asylum seekers – proportionally more than any other country in Europe. That produced other problems, many of them peculiar to Sweden’s high skills economy.

In 2015, 35,000 children arrived in Sweden as asylum seekers without parents. Families in war-torn countries heard Sweden was giving permanent residence permits to all Syrians seeking asylum and many managed to scrape the money together to send over one child apiece. That child was often a teenager, without a word of Swedish.

In Britain, by contrast, migrants and asylum seekers arrive with a basic grasp of English and can find casual jobs without qualifications. Essentially, Britain’s world of low-pay, zero-hour contracts, means immigrants can get a start. New arrival in Sweden by contrast, often cannot, which leads to unemployment and housing segregation. Still, the ‘refugee crisis’ is not a part of everyday life. Society hasn’t collapsed and Swedes are still more welcoming to incomers than folk from other EU countries.

According to a Europe-wide survey published last year, 64 per cent of Swedes are positive to immigrants from outside the EU compared to 37 per cent across the EU itself. So the big question is not whether the Sweden Democrats will increase their vote but whether that gives them any meaningful political clout. Every other party has rejected the idea of forming a coalition, and whilst that may create awkward bedfellows amongst the other parties, there’s a strong incentive to make common cause. But whilst British voters are quite used to seeing large bodies of political opinion frozen out of power as a result of First Past the Post voting, the Swedes with their fully proportional voting system are not. Will exclusion fuel support for the Sweden Democrats or will mainstream parties cooperate, contain the threat and devise innovative ways to boost integration? Despite support from prominent eugenicists in the Nazi era, far-right ideology did not overtake Sweden in the 1940s. The Swedes can resist it again.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4797254.1536508690!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797254.1536508690!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Jimmie Akesson, leader of the right-wing nationalist Sweden Democrats party, votes in the Swedish general election. Picture: Getty","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Jimmie Akesson, leader of the right-wing nationalist Sweden Democrats party, votes in the Swedish general election. Picture: Getty","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4797254.1536508690!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/two-british-tourists-among-seven-injured-in-paris-knife-attack-1-4797336","id":"1.4797336","articleHeadline": "Two British tourists among seven injured in Paris knife attack","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536558224000 ,"articleLead": "

Two British tourists are among seven injured after they were attacked by an armed man in Paris, local media reported.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797335.1536558078!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "French police on the scene where seven people were attacked by an armed man in Paris. Picture: AFP"} ,"articleBody": "

A man armed with a knife and an iron bar is said to have attacked people on the banks of a canal in the north-east of the city at just after 11pm local time.

Four people were injured seriously, while Le Parisien said one British tourist has a chest injury while another was stabbed in the head.

READ MORE: Scottish man stabbed in Magaluf ‘after fight with English tourists’

The paper said the perpetrator stabbed three people near a cinema on the Bassin de la Villette, and men playing petanque nearby attempted to stop the man, with one throwing a ball at him.

It is reported a man of Afghan nationality has been arrested and the incident is not being treated as terrorism, police said.

The Foreign Office said: “We are urgently investigating this incident and are in close contact with the French authorities.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ALEXANDER BRITTON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4797335.1536558078!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4797335.1536558078!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "French police on the scene where seven people were attacked by an armed man in Paris. Picture: AFP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "French police on the scene where seven people were attacked by an armed man in Paris. Picture: AFP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4797335.1536558078!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/christine-jardine-the-eu-champions-lgbt-rights-will-brexit-britain-1-4796851","id":"1.4796851","articleHeadline": "Christine Jardine: The EU champions LGBT rights – will Brexit Britain?","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1536555600000 ,"articleLead": "

writes Christine Jardine.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4796850.1536335659!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Pride marchers fill the Royal Mile in Edinburgh (Picture: Ian Georgeson)"} ,"articleBody": "

The news from India this week that gay sex will no longer be a crime reminded me of a few years ago at a public meeting when I was asked about my attitude to equal marriage.

My answer? “For me the important word is equal. If I had two children and one was straight, the other gay, I would want them both to have the same rights, same protection under the law and the same opportunity to commit to the person they love.”

I am proud not just of the fact that this is a question I wouldn’t even need to think about now in this country, but that as a member of the EU we have placed promoting those rights abroad at the centre of our foreign policy.

But as I think about the decisions this parliament has to make, and the impact they will have on all of our lives, I can’t help but worry about the safety of those rights and others which have been hard won.

Can we ever assume that they are completely beyond the reach of their opponents?

Surely the current debate in the US over Roe versus Wade – the landmark Supreme Court case that secured the right to have an abortion – demonstrates that even in a democracy there is never any room for complacency.

In June, I had the privilege of speaking to the Pride March in Edinburgh.

The celebration of diversity along the Royal Mile was awe-inspiring. A display of love and joy, and a very long way from the bitter, divisive atmosphere in which the now nationwide event was born.

Pride marks the Stonewall Riots of June 1969, and was originally a show of defiance and rebellion against repression.

As a society we have travelled a long way, but this is not the time to relax and assume the work is done.

I have LGBT constituents who are still not comfortable holding their partners hand in public, or displaying any kind of affection, in case they draw attention to themselves.

That breaks my heart.

READ MORE: LGBT Scots fear discrimination in workplace

But it also strengthens my commitment and my gratitude for the work that has been done on this and many other human rights, in many ways enabled by our membership of the European family.

It was EU law, specifically the charter of fundamental rights, that kick-started the UK’s commitment to LGBT equality.

And of course, EU laws have never limited our ability to set higher rights for LGBT people in areas like employment discrimination, or to pass laws on equal marriage.

But the Charter does specifically outlaw discrimination on sexual orientation.

It has been used by the Court of Justice to outlaw homophobia, and to make it clear that the sort of incidents we have seen particularly in eastern Europe are unacceptable.

Yes, the UK has gone beyond what has been required by EU law, but without the measures adopted by the EU, the encouragement that offered and the legislative background it provided, would we be where we are now?

While the Tory government seeks to argue that the protections enshrined in the Charter already exist in British law or will be incorporated through other EU directives, there is really no coherent argument for scrapping it.

The Charter is the only international human rights document that contains a provision specifically outlawing discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation.

During recess we saw the Prime Minister dance her way across Africa in a desperate attempt to strike trade deals to plug the economic hole we know will be created by Brexit.

One of the countries she visited was Nigeria, where homosexual acts are punishable by up to 14 years in prison.

Back in June waiting to speak to the crowds in Edinburgh, I couldn’t help but remember that question back in 2011.

READ MORE: Ruth Davidson: How secrets about sexuality damage the economy

But I also thought about the young people in Nigeria, and elsewhere, who every day, deal with recognising their sexuality.

I thought about the fear that must come with it for them, and their parents, if that sexuality will not be respected in their society the way it is here.

In Nigeria, same sex couples are denied the same rights and opportunities as their heterosexual peers. They face persecution, ridicule and prison.

That’s not what I would want for my child, or anyone’s.

It saddens me that I couldn’t find a reference to human rights conditions in any of Mrs May’s speeches.

By contrast, we do not need any visiting dignitary to raise the issue.

It is a condition of EU or single market membership that countries must respect LGBT+ and other human rights.

One of the reasons I am so proud of being a Liberal Democrat is that the party believes that British foreign policy should seek to promote the liberal values of human rights and democracy throughout the world.

Gay rights are human rights. Whether it’s across the world or close to home, and we all have a moral responsibility to protect them.

I know and respect that there were many reasons why people voted for Brexit in 2016.

But I don’t believe that anyone who cherishes freedom voted to diminish their rights, their childrens’ rights or to make people feel less safe in their own country.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Christine Jardine"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4796850.1536335659!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4796850.1536335659!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Pride marchers fill the Royal Mile in Edinburgh (Picture: Ian Georgeson)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Pride marchers fill the Royal Mile in Edinburgh (Picture: Ian Georgeson)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4796850.1536335659!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}