{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"world","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/sandy-hook-families-release-haunting-us-school-shooting-awareness-video-1-5007531","id":"1.5007531","articleHeadline": "Sandy Hook families release haunting US school shooting awareness video","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568909890000 ,"articleLead": "

The attack on Sandy Hook Elementary Shoot remains the deadliest mass shooting at a American school.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5007530.1568906469!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The difficult to watch video has gone viral and prompted renewed calls for change in US gun laws. Picture: Sandy Hook Promise"} ,"articleBody": "

A total of 26 people - including 20 children aged six and seven - when a gunman stormed the campus in Newtown, Connecticut in 2012.

The incident sparked fresh debate about US gun control laws and now Sandy Hook Promise (SHP) - a group made up of some of the families of the victims - has released a 'public service announcement' (PSA) video to raise awareness about the issue.

READ MORE: Connecticut shooting: ‘Unbearable’ pain of Scots who taught children of Newtown
The footage starts like a normal back-to-school commercial with youngsters discussing new rucksacks, folders and gadgets.

But the video takes a frightening turn when the sound of gunfire and screams are heard. The children use their back-to-school items to try to save themselves and their friends from an unseen gunman.

One girl uses school socks to stop the bleeding of a stricken classmate. In the most difficult to watch scene, another girl is shown hiding in a bathroom texting her mother a \"I love you mom\" message on her new phone.

READ MORE: Tapes of 911 calls from Sandy Hook released
SHP co-founder Mark Barden said: “This PSA is a gut punch, it’s uncomfortable, it’s hard to watch, but you can’t sanitise a school shooting. My hope is that folks will see this and be inspired to take action.”

Mr Barden's seven-year-old son Daniel was one of the casualties of the shooting in December 2012.

The video is part of SHP's 'Know the Signs' campaign which seeks to prevent school shootings and suicides by identifying students at risk of hurting themselves or someone else.

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@scotsman.com" ,"author": "Joshua King"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5007530.1568906469!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5007530.1568906469!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The difficult to watch video has gone viral and prompted renewed calls for change in US gun laws. Picture: Sandy Hook Promise","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The difficult to watch video has gone viral and prompted renewed calls for change in US gun laws. Picture: Sandy Hook Promise","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5007530.1568906469!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"3000000011222836"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/why-dontfeedthetrolls-campaign-doesn-t-let-social-media-giants-off-hook-laura-waddell-1-5006860","id":"1.5006860","articleHeadline": "Why #DontFeedTheTrolls campaign doesn’t let social media giants off hook – Laura Waddell","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568869200000 ,"articleLead": "

It should not be left to the victims of racism, sexism and other forms of prejudice to tackle online abuse through campaigns like #DontFeedTheTrolls, writes Laura Waddell.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5006859.1568826130!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Rachel Riley, a presenter of TV show Countdown, is among a number of high-profile figures who have pledged not to publicise the social media abuse they receive (Picture: Neil Hanna)"} ,"articleBody": "

There is a lot to unpack in the recent #DontFeedTheTrolls campaign, which is, with many caveats, largely common sense. Launched by new charity Center for Countering Digital Hate, stars lined up to show their support, some of whom will hopefully start following the suggestion more closely themselves.

As a phrase, ‘don’t feel the trolls’ has been in use since the early days of internet forums, where the word ‘troll’ came to mean someone sometimes malevolent, but always time-wasting, users who got their kicks from bothering others. They weren’t always nasty. Sometimes they were the jesters of a group, deploying practical jokes and making mischief. This kind were an early example of what’s now known as ‘s***posting’, the creation and sharing of content that is, by design, pointless and insincere, underpinned by a nihilistic view about the state of current affairs, and the sense that why not fritter away time being surreal and annoying to public figures online, if society is in meltdown anyway. Dictionary.com defines the term as “to post off-topic, false, or offensive contributions to an online forum with the intent to derail the discussion or provoke other participants”.

But at their worst, trolls were abusive, often racist, homophobic, sexist and threatening, and they proliferated in online spaces dominated by young men banding together and hostile to others, where it was possible to use anonymity with sinister intent, encouraged by the toxic bravado that set the tone of belonging in so many humour and gaming forums.

READ MORE: High profile celebs pledge not to publicise social media abuse they receive from vile trolls

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When online abuse began to be discussed in the mainstream as a result of social media usage becoming widespread, there was a conflation of ‘trolling’ with ‘abuse’ that wasn’t especially helpful to understanding either, because while trolling could encapsulate abuse, the word minimised and was inaccurate about what was happening. Traditional media has often been slow off the mark to understand and analyse online behaviour.

It’s easy to brush off abuse as just some online thing when it’s called trolling, and that propagates the idea that online threats have minimal inpact when the reality is not only can they be as law-breaking as threats and intimidation in the offline world, but studies have shown they have a diminishing effect on demographics already under-represented in public discourse.

Amnesty International has been looking into the impact of online abuse, specifically aimed at women, and in 2017 released a study conducted in eight countries showing that almost a quarter of women online had experienced online abuse or harassment, and that 41 per cent of those felt their physical safety was threatened as a result of online abuse. The impact has slowly begun to be understood as a freedom of speech issue, with abuse leading to self-censorship and stress, preventing women from expressing themselves freely and joining in public life.

Shockingly, Diane Abbot alone received 45 per cent of abusive tweets sent to MPs in the weeks prior to the 2017 election. Similarly, when the Guardian took the interesting and commendable step of analysing comments, they found that women and black writers received a disproportionate amount of abuse. There is a school of thought that the internet, and particularly social media, is the cause of abuse. Certainly, there are many exacerbating factors. But social media also makes existing thoughts and tendencies visible, and what’s on view here is racism and sexism that already exists in individuals, expressed in violent and threatening ways.

READ MORE: Humza Yousaf: I would meet Twitter trolls who send me racist messages

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon urges online trolls to ‘take a long hard look at themselves’

In her recent book of essays, Trick Mirror, a brilliant and excavating look at contemporary culture, there is a section where author Jia Tolentino examines trolling and the “mutual dependency” that can encourage it. Arguing online can be addictive and cathartic. Who doesn’t want to swear on Twitter sometimes? But while blocking can feel like doing nothing, it’s still taking an action, and a more decisive one than engaging with and providing attention to those who seek it.

For a very small minority of users who are highly visible, engaging with ‘trolls’ also becomes part of their personal brand. Let’s be clear – this is not about taking a stand in a useful or important way, but performatively squabbling with anonymous or clearly malevolent accounts, sometimes to depict themselves as at the forefront of a social movement. It’s also frustrating to see an easy supply of responses to career controversialists like Katie Hopkins and Piers Morgan, who dangle bait and always get a bite. Common sense seems in short supply in these instances.

But where is corporate responsibility in all this? Blocking and muting is good advice, but it’s also treating the symptom of a larger disease. We’re encouraged by social sites to put more and more of ourselves online under the guise of making connections and networking. Social media has been an important tool for people under-represented in mainstream public expression, and has helped communities and movements bolster one another and flourish. But just as capitalism encourages us to create personal brands and turn ourselves into walking advertisements in increasingly insidious ways, the ultimate goal of social media sites is to profit from their users. The negligence over cracking down on content which is abusive and prejudiced cannot be overlooked. When Amnesty International began to examine the impact of online abuse on freedom of expression, they discovered much of it was against the terms and conditions of social sites which let it flourish unchecked. Facebook has infamously banned images of breast-feeding, including any nipple shots on its sister site Instagram, but far-right propaganda and hate speech run rampant.

Blocking and muting, in order not to feed the trolls, is for the most part a sensible coping strategy for individuals. But placing the onus on social media users to solve the problem sites have failed to, which disproportionately impacts women and racial and sexual minorities, lets social behemoths who make staggering profits from our data off the hook. Perhaps it’s time for legal requirement for social media sites to enforce their own community standards and deal with hate speech adequately, at risk of financial penalty.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5006859.1568826130!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5006859.1568826130!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Rachel Riley, a presenter of TV show Countdown, is among a number of high-profile figures who have pledged not to publicise the social media abuse they receive (Picture: Neil Hanna)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Rachel Riley, a presenter of TV show Countdown, is among a number of high-profile figures who have pledged not to publicise the social media abuse they receive (Picture: Neil Hanna)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5006859.1568826130!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/us-defence-dept-spends-140-000-at-donald-trump-s-turnberry-resort-1-5006905","id":"1.5006905","articleHeadline": "US Defence Dept spends £140,000 at Donald Trump's Turnberry resort","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568829826762 ,"articleLead": "

The US Defence Department has spent more than £140,000 at Donald Trump's loss making flagship Scottish resort since August 2017, according to a powerful US Congressional committee investigating the ties between the US president's business, the US military, and Glasgow Prestwick Airport.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5006904.1568830026!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry resort is at the centre of a Congressional inquiry. Picture: John Devlin"} ,"articleBody": "

The House Oversight Committee, which is investigating potential conflicts of interest surrounding Mr Trump's Turnberry hotel and golf resort, said spending records show the Pentagon has used US taxpayers' money to pay for more than three dozen separate stays, involving hundreds of nights of room bookings.

While the committee claims the US Defence Department is continuing to withhold information about its patronage of Mr Trump's South Ayrshire firm, describing its response to date as \"woefully inadequate,\" the new disclosures detail an unprecedented level of transactions between the Trump administration and the president's resort.

Information disclosed so far shows that the department's spending at Turnberry amounts to $124,578 (£99,719) over the period August 2017 to July this year. That, says the House Oversight Committee, is the equivalent of more than 650 rooms, or \"more than one room every night for more than one and a half years\" as Democrats Elijah Cummings and Jamie Raskin put it.

However, even that figure does not include an additional $59,729 (£47,810) run up in unspecified charges on government travel cards, which brings the total military spending at Turnberry to more than $184,000 (£140,000).

As previously revealed by The Scotsman, the US State Department has spent tens of thousands of pounds at Mr Trump's struggling resort - transactions that are the subject of separate inquiries in the US Congress - but even that level of custom is dwarfed by what the Pentagon is spending.

In a letter sent today to the Pentagon, Mr Cummings and Mr Raskin, respectively the chair of the House Oversight Committee and the Subcommittee on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties in the US House of Representatives, demanded documents being withheld by the US Defence Department following previous requests for information.

In a statement, the two men said: \"Unfortunately, the department’s response has been woefully inadequate. To date, the department has produced only 21 pages of material - half of which appear to be publicly available on government websites.

\"The department failed to produce any underlying invoices or travel records relating to spending at Trump Turnberry or Prestwick Airport. It is unclear why the department has taken so long to produce such rudimentary and deficient information.”

They added: “Although the department’s response is belated and deficient, it still reveals that far more taxpayer funds have been spent at the president’s resort than previously known. Although initial press accounts reported only a single instance of a military crew staying at Trump Turnberry this spring, the data provided by the department now indicates that US. taxpayer funds have been used to pay for more than three dozen separate stays involving hundreds of nights of rooms - all after the president was sworn into office.”

According to the disclosures, the US Defence Department stayed that the average cost of a room for military personnel staying at Turnberry was $189 (£151).

In addition, fuel expenditures at Prestwick Airport from 20 January 2017 through 21 June this year amounted to $16,617,664.7 (£13,301,775).

The Scotsman revealed details of the fuel spending - organised through a contract between Prestwick and the US Defence Logistics Agency - in June. It also revealed last week that a new deal between the state-owned airport and the DLA had been postponed, with one source stating that it had been \"kicked into the long grass\" in light of the Congressional inquiry.

The House Oversight Committee also raised concerns with the US Defence Department’s refusal to disclose its communications with outside entities about Trump Turnberry or Prestwick Airport, instead referring the committee’s requests for these documents to the White House, despite the president’s claim on Twitter that he had \"nothing to do\" with these matters.

" ,"byline": {"email": "martyn.mclaughlin@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Martyn McLaughlin"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5006904.1568830026!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5006904.1568830026!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry resort is at the centre of a Congressional inquiry. Picture: John Devlin","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry resort is at the centre of a Congressional inquiry. Picture: John Devlin","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5006904.1568830026!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/people/backstreet-boy-nick-carter-gets-restraining-order-against-brother-aaron-1-5006508","id":"1.5006508","articleHeadline": "Backstreet Boy Nick Carter gets restraining order against brother Aaron","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568810952108 ,"articleLead": "

Backstreet Boy Nick Carter has taken out a restraining order against younger brother Aaron.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5006507.1568811250!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The popstar said the restraining was needed after his little brother"threatened to kill" Nick's pregnant wife."} ,"articleBody": "

The popstar said the restraining was needed after his little brother \"threatened to kill\" Nick's pregnant wife, according to the BBC.

The singer, 39, said the legal move came \"in light of Aaron's increasingly alarming behaviour\".

Aaron, 31, must now stay 30 metres away from Nick, his family and their Las Vegas home.

In response, Aaron Carter said he was \"astounded\" by the accusations.

\"I do not wish harm to anyone, especially my family,\" he said.

Nick Carter said: \"After careful consideration, my sister Angel and I regret that we were required to seek a restraining order against our brother Aaron.

\"In light of Aaron's increasingly alarming behaviour and his recent confessions that he harbours thoughts and intentions of killing my pregnant wife and unborn child, we were left with no choice but to take every measure possible to protect ourselves and our family.

\"We love our brother and truly hope he gets the proper treatment he needs before any harm comes to himself or anyone else.\"

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5006507.1568811250!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5006507.1568811250!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The popstar said the restraining was needed after his little brother"threatened to kill" Nick's pregnant wife.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The popstar said the restraining was needed after his little brother"threatened to kill" Nick's pregnant wife.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5006507.1568811250!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/people/surfer-saved-from-shark-attack-thanks-to-drone-warning-1-5005914","id":"1.5005914","articleHeadline": "Surfer saved from shark attack thanks to drone warning","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568728541971 ,"articleLead": "

A surfer was saved from a possible shark attack thanks to a warning from a drone flying above the ocean.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005913.1568728804!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A surfer was saved from a possible shark attack thanks to a warning from a drone flying above the ocean."} ,"articleBody": "

Amateur drone operator Christopher Joye was patrolling at Werri Beach in New South Wales on Sunday when he spotted a shark in the water heading towards a nearby surfer.

Using a speaker on his drone, which is a search-and-rescue model, he was able to send out a warning message to the surfer, who quickly turned their board towards land - seemingly spooking the shark.

While the shark swam back out to sea, the surfer quickly headed for the shore.

\"I think it is probably the first time any drone pilot anywhere in the world has stopped a shark attack by warning the swimmers or surfers via a live communications channel,\" Mr Joye said.

Mr Joye, who is a hedge fund manager by day, spends much of his spare time patrolling the seas for sharks using his drone.

\"I do it because I have seen so many sharks from the drone that someone has to try and keep our surfers and swimmers safe,\" he said.

READ MORE - Scottish islanders in \"state of disbelief\" after local man killed in Benidorm during golf trip

\"That's why I bought the search and rescue drone with the ability to send alerts and communicate with people whose lives are at risk.\"

Sunday was the first time he had used his Mavic 2 Enterprise Dual, which cost around AUS$6,000 (£3,300), to warn of a possible imminent attack.

\"I was patrolling on Sunday and saw this large shark circling a surfer,\" he said. \"I raced in an blasted out the alert message, blaring, 'Shark! Shark! Shark! Evacuate the water immediately!'

\"You can see the surfer's face as he suddenly looks up at the drone when he hears the message.

READ MORE - Theme Park Flamingo Land pulls out of £30million Loch Lomond development

\"He then sharply jerks the board toward the beach, which spooks the shark that was heading straight for him, probably thinking the surfer was unaware.\"

Mr Joye believes the shark was three to four metres in length and probably \"a bronze whaler or a young great white, both of which have many recorded human fatalities\".

He wants drone technology to be more widely used in preventing such attacks.

\"The drone is much safer and more effective for sharks than a shark net,\" he said.

There were 128 shark attacks in New South Wales between 1990 and 2017, according to statistics compiled by finder.com - nearly twice as many as any other state in Australia.

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5005913.1568728804!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005913.1568728804!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A surfer was saved from a possible shark attack thanks to a warning from a drone flying above the ocean.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A surfer was saved from a possible shark attack thanks to a warning from a drone flying above the ocean.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5005913.1568728804!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/iran-donald-trump-s-strategy-to-speak-loudly-but-carry-a-small-stick-may-end-in-war-dr-steven-hurst-1-5005595","id":"1.5005595","articleHeadline": "Iran: Donald Trump's strategy to 'speak loudly but carry a small stick' may end in war – Dr Steven Hurst","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568713898584 ,"articleLead": "According to Donald Trump, the US is \"locked and loaded\"and ready to take action against the culprits responsible for the recent attacks on Saudi Arabian oil installations. The culprit in question, the Trump administration has already implied, is Iran, raising the possibility of a major military conflict in the Middle East.","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005594.1568714019!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump has been talking tough but does not appear to want to become embroiled in a major conflict (Picture: Getty)"} ,"articleBody": "

How seriously should we take this threat? Trump has form in this area, having previously threatened Iran and North Korea with "obliteration" and "total destruction" respectively without taking any subsequent action.

When Iran shot down an unmanned US drone earlier this year, Trump initially authorised retaliatory strikes only subsequently to back down.

In practice, his use of military force has been restricted to a couple of small retaliatory missile strikes in Syria and an increased use of drone strikes elsewhere, indicative of his reluctance to risk US casualties in prolonged military conflict.

The evidence thus suggests that Trump is the antithesis of former president Theodore Roosevelt's diplomatic ideal – he speaks loudly but carries a small stick.

READ MORE: Will UK petrol prices rise because of the oil attack in Saudi Arabia?

For unlimited access to Scotland’s best news, sport and expert analysis, SUBSCRIBE to The Scotsman website here

Trump doesn't want a war with Iran with an election a year away. He wants to look tough and decisive, but a strike against Iranian targets will not be a one-off.

Iranian retaliation in some form or another, whether against US shipping in the Gulf or against US allies in the region, is inevitable and from there things could get very messy very quickly.

Nor, for all of its own, equally inflammatory rhetoric, does the Iranian regime want a military conflict with the United States. While Iran would not be 'obliterated' in such a conflict, it would suffer a great deal of damage which would undermine a weak economy and risk provoking a major domestic backlash against an already unpopular regime.

Of course, the fact that neither side wants war does not guarantee that there will not be one, particularly when the two countries involved are locked into a pathological relationship of mutual hostility which plays such a central role in their domestic politics.

READ MORE: Iranian foreign minister should be banned from Europe, not welcomed – Struan Stevenson

Both regimes have demonised the other for decades and the language of threat and confrontation is used by both sides as a tool to secure domestic political legitimacy.

Trump's threats against Iran mobilise his 'base' while in Tehran standing up to the US and issuing dire warnings of what Iran will do should the US dare to attack it is almost a competitive sport. In Iran's complex factional politics, being perceived as soft on the US is only ever disadvantageous.

It remains most likely that both parties will seek to avoid direct conflict – Trump's "locked and loaded" comment contains plenty of qualifications that will allow him to avoid military action against Iran.

Nevertheless, as long as both countries continue to demonise the other, and as long as the rhetoric of threat and counter-threat remains inherent to the political discourse on both sides, the danger of one or the other government painting itself into a rhetorical corner or provoking the other into aggression will always remain.

Dr Steven Hurst is a reader in politics at Manchester Metropolitan University

" ,"byline": {"email": "ian.johnston1@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Steven Hurst"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5005594.1568714019!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005594.1568714019!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Donald Trump has been talking tough but does not appear to want to become embroiled in a major conflict (Picture: Getty)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump has been talking tough but does not appear to want to become embroiled in a major conflict (Picture: Getty)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5005594.1568714019!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/until-climate-strikers-came-along-i-thought-i-d-heard-it-all-before-dr-richard-dixon-1-5005206","id":"1.5005206","articleHeadline": "Until climate strikers came along, I thought I’d heard it all before – Dr Richard Dixon","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568647573000 ,"articleLead": "

School climate strikers are the biggest youth-led movement ever and they have a message that’s really worth listening to, writes Dr Richard Dixon ahead of a week of protests in Scotland and around the world, beginning on Friday.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005205.1568647570!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "School climate strikers have become the biggest youth-led movement ever (Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)"} ,"articleBody": "

From simple beginnings in Sweden, Friday will see the start of a global week of protest and action on climate change, led by children.

When I met Greta Thunberg briefly at the climate summit in Katowice last year, I thanked her for all she was doing to bring attention to the need for more climate action. At that point, she had been holding her own personal climate strike outside the Swedish Parliament for five months. This had begun a global movement of school children striking for the climate and she was in Poland to give a speech in front of the UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres. Quite a thing for a 15-year-old.

Since then and now 16, she has spoken at the World Economic Forum, to EU leaders and in front of huge crowds. And she has just sailed across an ocean so she can speak at the UN climate summit in New York next week. Politicians who care about climate change are queuing up to be seen with her and on Friday she was protesting outside the White House with thousands of US students.

READ MORE: Top government scientist: ‘Earth’s situation now so grave it’s appropriate to be scared’

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Some of the negative reactions to Greta have been grotesque. When she was sailing across the Atlantic, Brexit campaign funder Arron Banks wrote his disgusting “freak yacht accident” tweet. Others mocked her Asperger’s syndrome. The reaction she has provoked, often from middle-aged, right-wing men, shows they think she is a threat to their version of the world and reveals how vile some of those who oppose action on climate change really are.

The movement she started has gone from strength to strength, becoming the largest youth-led movement ever. There have been school strikes across the world and a week of action starts this Friday with millions of people – children and adults this time – expected to take part in thousands of marches, rallies and strikes in 150 countries.

On Friday, there will be climate strikes in at least 17 places in Scotland, including marches with thousands of people expected in Edinburgh and Glasgow. In a massive misjudgement, Edinburgh council refused permission for the march there to travel along a short stretch of Princes Street and even threatened that the organisers could be arrested. The council has now apologised for making that threat. This refusal was particularly disgraceful given there were, at one point, 40 sectarian marches planned in Glasgow with the associated heavy policing, and more than 20 streets in Edinburgh closed for filming a film about racing fast cars. Fast cars are apparently more important than saving the planet. The irony.

READ MORE: School climate strikers are about to stage a whole week of protests – Dylan Hamilton

READ MORE: Scotland misses climate change target

I’ve been outside Parliament several times to see the climate strikes including the two big rallies, one with about 7,000 young people. The children had organised all this themselves.

I’ll let you into a secret. I’ve been to lots of rallies and marches in my life but in the last decade I can’t usually be bothered to listen to the speeches, it mostly feels like I’ve heard it all before. But the children outside Parliament gave speech after speech that was really worth listening to.

I’ll be there again this Friday because it is really inspiring and heart-warming to see the people whose future we are all trashing saying they’ve had enough and they want action.

If you can come on Friday, please join your local strike. If you can’t come, please find time to mark the Global Climate Strike in whatever way you can. I hope to see you on the streets.

Dr Richard Dixon is director of Friends of the Earth Scotland

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5005205.1568647570!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005205.1568647570!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "School climate strikers have become the biggest youth-led movement ever (Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "School climate strikers have become the biggest youth-led movement ever (Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5005205.1568647570!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/pigeon-poos-on-politician-being-interviewed-about-pigeon-poo-problem-1-5005427","id":"1.5005427","articleHeadline": "Pigeon poos on politician being interviewed...about pigeon poo problem","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568700190000 ,"articleLead": "

A pigeon apparently didn't think much of a local politicians idea to tidy up a train hub known as 'pigeon poop station' and did its business on his head during an interview.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005426.1568659087!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Who knew pigeons had a sense of irony?"} ,"articleBody": "

Chicago's WBBM-TV reports that one of the birds did its business on the head of Democratic state Rep. Jaime Andrade as he was discussing the problem with a reporter outside of the Irving Park Blue Line station.

During the interview, Andrade rubbed the top of his head and said, \"I think they just got me.\" They did.

The sidewalks outside of the station are covered in bird waste and feathers.

Andrade has been trying to fix the problem. One of his ideas is to ask the CTA to install a hose line for power washing when it constructs new escalators at the stop.

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@scotsman.com" ,"author": "Diane King"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5005426.1568659087!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005426.1568659087!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Who knew pigeons had a sense of irony?","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Who knew pigeons had a sense of irony?","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5005426.1568659087!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/people/scottish-charity-campaigning-to-end-homelessness-with-global-sleep-out-1-5005470","id":"1.5005470","articleHeadline": "Scottish charity campaigning to end homelessness with global Sleep Out","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568696401000 ,"articleLead": "

A pioneering charity event begun in Scotland two years ago is going global, with the aim of raising more than £40 million for homeless people worldwide.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005469.1568667789!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sleep in the Park, held in Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh"} ,"articleBody": "

The World’s Big Sleep Out is aiming to see 50,000 people around the globe spend a night outside this December to bring in support for people who have become homeless or been displaced due to conflict, natural disasters or poverty.

Gatherings are due to take place in up to 50 cities worldwide, including Edinburgh, London, Dublin, Los Angeles, New York, Madrid, Singapore, Amsterdam and New Delhi.

The event comes on the back of the successful Sleep in the Park campaign, which began in Scotland in 2017 and has so far raised nearly £8m to help get people off the streets.

It is the brainchild of Josh Littlejohn, founder of Edinburgh-based homelessness charity Social Bite, which has created a specially designed “village” in the Scottish capital to help homeless people get their lives back on track.

Will Smith, Dame Helen Mirren, Sir Chris Hoy and Jamelia are among a number of celebrities, musicians, sporting heroes and politicians who are taking part in the World’s Big Sleep Out.

Members of the public are also being encouraged to host their own events to support the fundraising drive, thought to be the largest charity campaign in a generation.

Acclaimed actor Dame Helen Mirren, who will read a bedtime story to participants in London’s Trafalgar Square, said: “Homelessness on our streets is a real problem in the UK and for many nations throughout the world.

“This, coupled with an unprecedented number of refugees being displaced internationally, makes this a really important time to focus attention on the issue of global homelessness. The World’s Big Sleep Out campaign will play an important role in shining the political spotlight on the issues of homelessness and displacement whilst raising considerable funds to make a big difference.”

Mr Littlejohn said he was “blown away” by the response to the World’s Big Sleep Out so far and “incredibly excited” to have 50 cities taking part.

He added: “It doesn’t matter if you are taking part in Times Square or in your back garden with your family, by sleeping out for one night on 7 December we can simultaneously express our compassion for homeless people who have no other choice and raise life-saving funds to make a difference.

“We can also send a message to the world’s political leaders that urgent action is required to address the human suffering that we each witness on our streets every day.”

All money raised will be governed by new charity The World’s Big Sleep Out Trust.

Social Bite will receive half of all donations brought in, with the remaining 50 per cent going to global charities helping men, women and children who have lost their homes due to conflict, violence, natural disasters and poverty.

Funds raised in the United States will be managed by Unicef USA with support from the Robin Hood Foundation.

Social Bite started as a sandwich shop in Edinburgh’s Rose Street in August 2012 and has since grown to become a major driving force in tackling homelessness in Scotland.

A quarter of Social Bite staff are homeless and the charity has received visits from Hollywood superstars Leonardo DiCaprio and George Clooney.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5005469.1568667789!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005469.1568667789!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Sleep in the Park, held in Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sleep in the Park, held in Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5005469.1568667789!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/will-uk-petrol-prices-rise-because-of-the-oil-attack-in-saudi-arabia-1-5005052","id":"1.5005052","articleHeadline": "Will UK petrol prices rise because of the oil attack in Saudi Arabia?","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568632391000 ,"articleLead": "

Oil prices have jumped by 20 per cent after two attacks on facilities in Saudi Arabia over the weekend knocked out more than five per cent of the world’s supply.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005051.1568631367!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The 20 per cent surge in the oil price is the biggest intraday move since the Brent crude contract was created in the 1980s"} ,"articleBody": "

Foreign secretary Dominic Raab described the attacks as “despicable” on Monday but added it was “not entirely clear who is responsible”.

The 20 per cent surge in the oil price this morning is the biggest intraday move since the Brent crude contract was created in the 1980s, according to financial analysts Bloomberg.

But the question many Scots will be asking is: will this lead to rising petrol prices as a result?

Aneeka Gupta, commodities strategist at the fund manager Wisdom Tree, told the BBC that higher oil prices would not have an immediate impact on consumers as they “could take a bit of time of feed through”.

Bob McNally, a former energy adviser in George W. Bush’s administration, told the broadcaster: “I think it’s going to last. As long as the United States and Saudi Arabia on one hand and Iran on the other remain in this escalatory conflict then we’re going to build in a risk premium because it’s getting very serious.”

But Amrita Sen, analyst at Energy Aspects, told Sky News that consumers will see the impact of today’s oil price spike in a few weeks time.

He also predicted that the International Energy Agency could organise a “co-ordinated release of oil” if Saudi production remains disrupted for weeks, to protect consumers from a price spike.

Meanwhile, Goldman Sachs has predicted that oil could hit $75 per barrel - 25 per cent higher than last Friday - if Saudi oil supplies are disrupted for six weeks or more.

Around half of Saudi Arabia’s 9.6million barrels per day have been knocked offline by Saturday’s attack. The key question is how quickly they return.

Goldman told clients that the longer the delay, the higher prices will go - even if America unlocks its strategic oil reserves to cope, as Donald Trump has pledged.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "CHRIS McCALL"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5005051.1568631367!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5005051.1568631367!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The 20 per cent surge in the oil price is the biggest intraday move since the Brent crude contract was created in the 1980s","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The 20 per cent surge in the oil price is the biggest intraday move since the Brent crude contract was created in the 1980s","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5005051.1568631367!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/people/donald-trump-s-relative-he-s-never-given-a-penny-to-his-mother-s-scottish-community-1-5004387","id":"1.5004387","articleHeadline": "Donald Trump's relative: He's never given a penny to his mother's Scottish community","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568475503192 ,"articleLead": "

Donald Trump has rarely expressed affection for his Scottish roots, and only once visited his mother’s home, spending less than two minutes inside the pebbledashed croft where she and her nine siblings were raised.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5004385.1568475785!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump alongside his mother."} ,"articleBody": "

Now, a relative of his has pointed out that the US president has “never given a penny” to the Hebridean community where his mother was born, and where many of his family remain.

Alice Mackay, who is related to Trump’s maternal family line, the MacLeods, said his mother and sister frequently returned to the crofting township of Tong on Lewis, with both making sizeable financial donations – in stark contrast to the 73-year-old.

The claim comes in a new feature-length documentary exploring the journey which took Trump’s late mother, Mary Anne MacLeod Trump, from the Outer Hebrides to New York, where she met and married his father, Fred.

READ MORE - The growing scandal over Donald Trump and Prestwick Airport – Martyn McLaughlin

As well as charting the poignant story of how Mary Anne was reunited with her Scottish pen pal nearly 70 years after they first wrote to one another, the programme, Trump’s Mother, explores Trump’s strained relationship with Scotland.

He visited Tong with his mother as a child and made his one and only return in 2008, while en route to give evidence at a public inquiry into his contentious inaugural Scottish golf resort.

Trump, known as Donald John to islanders, spent around three hours on Lewis, and even less time inside his mother’s modest birthplace, visiting for 97 seconds.

Mackay said Trump’s mother and his sister, Maryann Trump Barry, had maintained close links with the area, and ensured the wealth they accrued in their new lives across the Atlantic trickled back home.

“Maryann and his mother gave Tong a lot of money for the hall, and a lot of money to Bethesda [care home]. And Donald has never given a penny,” explained Trump’s distant cousin.

It is little known outside of Lewis, but the Trump family’s generosity towards Tong stretches back generations, although Donald is a notable exception. His mother, who died in 2000, gave a significant donation to build a village hall in the 1970s. In 2015, Maryann, a retired federal appellate judge who has visited Lewis dozens of times over the years, gave £158,000 to the Bethesda care home and hospice, based in Stornoway.

READ MORE - Donald Trump’s failed attempts to buy landmark St Andrews hotel

During his fleeting trip to Lewis 11 years ago, Trump appeared as if he was about to follow in Mary Anne’s footsteps, telling a press conference that he may look at “charitable things”.

A delegation from Comhairle nan Eilean Siar met with Trump to discuss their plans to convert Lews Castle, a mock baronial mansion, into a hotel and museum. Trump promised to “look at it” but the council never heard from him again.

The new documentary, which airs on BBC Alba this Tuesday, also hears from genealogist, Bill Lawson, who said Mary Anne’s own maternal descendants were forcibly removed from their homes during the Highland Clearances. “Her mother’s people had been refugees,” he explains.

Journalist Torcuil Crichton, who presents the documentary, said the story of how Mary Anne forged a better future in the US was ultimately one about immigrants.

“It was immigrants like Donald John Trump’s mother and his German grandfather who made the US powerful and wealthy,” he said. “It was immigrants who made America great.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "Martyn.McLaughlin@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "MARTYN McLAUGHLIN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5004385.1568475785!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5004385.1568475785!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Donald Trump alongside his mother.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump alongside his mother.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5004385.1568475785!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"3000000011212420"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/donald-trump-s-government-we-have-killed-osama-bin-laden-s-son-hamza-1-5004365","id":"1.5004365","articleHeadline": "Donald Trump's government: We have killed Osama bin Laden's son Hamza","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568470572249 ,"articleLead": "

Hamza bin Laden, the son of the late al Qaida leader Osama, has been killed in a US counter-terrorism operation in the Afghanistan-Pakistan region, White House officials have said.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5004364.1568470725!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Hamza Bin Laden, Osama's son. Picture: AP"} ,"articleBody": "

A statement gives no further details, such as when Hamza bin Laden, who had become an increasingly prominent figure in the terrorist organisation, was killed or how the US confirmed his death.

The statement says Hamza bin Laden's death \"not only deprives al Qaida of important leadership skills and the symbolic connection to his father, but undermines important operational activities of the group\".

As leader of al Qaida, Osama bin Laden and others plotted the attacks of September 11, 2001. US Navy SEALs killed him in a raid on a house in Abbottabad, Pakistan, in 2011.

READ MORE - Sam Smith: Singer wants to be called 'their' instead of 'he'

READ MORE - Take a look inside the most expensive hotel rooms in Edinburgh

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5004364.1568470725!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5004364.1568470725!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Hamza Bin Laden, Osama's son. Picture: AP","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Hamza Bin Laden, Osama's son. Picture: AP","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5004364.1568470725!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/life-in-malawi-suggests-marx-was-right-about-religion-susan-dalgety-1-5003880","id":"1.5003880","articleHeadline": "Life in Malawi suggests Marx was right about religion – Susan Dalgety","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568443500000 ,"articleLead": "

Nearly everyone has faith of some kind in Malawi, a country where only 11 per cent of the workforce has a formal job with a regular salary and employment rights, writes Susan Dalgety.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5003879.1568377531!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "St Michael's and All Angels Church in Blantyre, Malawi, completed in 1891, was designed by Rev David C Scott from Edinburgh and built, by hand, by Malawi craftsmen"} ,"articleBody": "

The woman heading towards us on the lake shore stopped and smiled. “Hello, welcome,” she said.

Then, turning to the three children walking silently behind her, she introduced them, “These are my family. We are Jehovah’s Witnesses,” and with that she continued on her way.

I thought little of our lunchtime encounter. Everyone in Malawi, it seems, has faith. The majority of the population adhere to the Presbyterian values and traditions introduced by Scottish missionaries in the second half of the 19th century.

One of the finest buildings in the country, St Michael and All Angels Church, was built in 1891 by a team of Malawians led by an Edinburgh minister, David Clement Scott. There is a large Catholic community, a similar number of Muslims, and a growing band of Pentecostals, Evangelicals and Adventists, all in thrall to the idea of a supreme being, whether Allah or God and, of course, life after death.

A few hours after meeting the friendly woman, she arrived at our front door, which was lying wide open to let in the last of the late afternoon sun.

“I have this for you,” she smiled, proffering two copies of the Watchtower, the Jehovah’s Witnesses’ proselytising magazine.

I hesitated, recalling the time as a young mother I argued for 20 minutes on my doorstep, on Christmas Eve morning, with an earnest Jehovah’s Witness determined to show me the error of my heathen ways.

READ MORE from Susan Dalgety’s Letter from Malawi series

For unlimited access to Scotland’s best news, sport and expert analysis, SUBSCRIBE to The Scotsman website here

But politeness won out over my scepticism, and I took the magazines with good grace. She bobbed, then said, “thank you, goodbye”, and left me alone with my atheism.

Flicking through one of them later that evening, I found, under the headline “Finding contentment”, a verse from Hebrews: “Let your way of life be free of the love of money, while you are content with the present things.”

Is that why everyone in Malawi has faith? Is religion truly the opiate of the masses, as Marx once said. Does the love of a god make up for having no money for school fees, or even food? Does the prospect of heaven, of a better life after death, compensate for living with HIV, or hunger, or malaria, and sometimes all three?

Why did Malawians embrace a white god when they had perfectly reasonable religious beliefs of their own, like the Bimbi cult in southern Malawi, which, like Christianity and Islam, has its own theology, liturgy and priesthood?

“Why did Scotland abandon God after you gave him to us?” a young journalist asked me several years ago, again on the shores of Lake Malawi. I had just finished explaining to her that most Scots did not go to church. I muttered something about economic development and quickly changed the subject. It is tough to argue with someone who has blind faith, when you have none.

My existential musings were rudely interrupted on Wednesday morning when our cheap Canon printer stuttered to a halt, just as I was trying to print out my book chapter on Malawi’s economy, which is also stuttering.

It turns out our printer cannot work unless both the colour and the black-and-white cartridges are full. “But I don’t need colour,” I wailed to my long-suffering husband. “I hate capitalism,” I shrieked when I realised I would have to shell out £25 for an accessory I would not use.

Ronex, the young man at the stationery shop in the nearby town of Chithenche, who cheerfully printed out my draft chapter on his functioning Epsom, does not hate capitalism, even though he is a victim of its cruel vagaries.

“I just want a job,” he told us later when we met for a longer chat. “I studied computing science and information systems at university, in Zomba, but I dropped out, I couldn’t afford it.”

Ronex is not alone. Access to higher education is fast becoming the preserve of Malawi’s small middle-class. Its elite has always been able to afford to educate their children, often abroad.

The Higher Education Students and Loan Board does offer some help to students from poor backgrounds, but with tuition fees running at around half a million kwacha a year, before living costs, it is struggling to meet demand.

“It is very clear the board seems to be overwhelmed...” thundered a leader in the Daily Times a few weeks ago. “...That is why being selected to university has become a curse to parents and students.”

Ronex explained: “I am trying to study project management by correspondence. And I work in my brother-in-law’s stationery shop when he goes to get more supplies, but what I really want is a proper job with a company.

“But there are no jobs, and very few proper companies.” He shrugs. In one brief, almost throwaway, sentence, Ronex summed up Malawi’s economy.

It has a population of 18 million people and growing. The majority of adults – six million at the last count – are in some form of paid work, but that simply means they, sometimes, earn money in exchange for their labour – as domestic servants, in casual labour, or growing and selling surplus crops.

Only 650,000 people, 11 per cent of the workforce, have a formal job, with a regular salary, labour rights and some security, so they can plan with confidence for marriage, babies and retirement. There are only 14 corporations listed on the Malawi stock exchange, and nine of those are in financial services. The money lenders.

Malawi’s online Yellow Pages shows 10,000 companies and NGOs, but many are small enterprises, employing one or two people at most.

And job opportunities in Malawi’s small manufacturing sector have declined in recent years, though the service sector is growing, albeit very slowly.

Research proves the brutal reality that Ronex faces. Despite investment in education, from early years to vocational training, there is very little evidence of a structural change in Malawi’s labour market. Farming is how most young people will enter the job market, and this is where they are likely to remain.

Ronex is still optimistic he will realise his dream.

“I love project management,” he says, “and I will be a good employee.” But I fear his faith may be tested over the months and years to come.

Perhaps, then, it is not surprising that the majority of Malawians still put their trust in an ancient prophet who declared, “it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5003879.1568377531!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5003879.1568377531!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "St Michael's and All Angels Church in Blantyre, Malawi, completed in 1891, was designed by Rev David C Scott from Edinburgh and built, by hand, by Malawi craftsmen","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "St Michael's and All Angels Church in Blantyre, Malawi, completed in 1891, was designed by Rev David C Scott from Edinburgh and built, by hand, by Malawi craftsmen","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5003879.1568377531!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/hollywood-star-felicity-huffman-jailed-over-college-admissions-scandal-1-5004260","id":"1.5004260","articleHeadline": "Hollywood star Felicity Huffman jailed over college admissions scandal","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568406352620 ,"articleLead": "

Actress Felicity Huffman has been sentenced to 14 days in prison for her involvement in a college admissions scandal.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5004259.1568406617!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Actress Felicity Huffman leaves federal court after her sentencing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Photo: AP/Elise Amendola"} ,"articleBody": "

The Desperate Housewives star admitted to paying $15,000 to have her daughter’s exam answers secretly corrected in 2017.

She must also do 250 hours of community service and pay a fine. Huffman pleaded guilty to mail and honest services fraud in May.

Parents and athletic coaches were among 50 people charged in the scheme.

“I am deeply sorry to the students, parents, colleges and universities impacted by my actions,” Huffman told the Boston court.

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@scotsman.com" ,"author": "Angus Howarth"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5004259.1568406617!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5004259.1568406617!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Actress Felicity Huffman leaves federal court after her sentencing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Photo: AP/Elise Amendola","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Actress Felicity Huffman leaves federal court after her sentencing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Photo: AP/Elise Amendola","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5004259.1568406617!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/is-leonardo-dicaprio-s-girlfriend-simply-too-young-for-him-jim-duffy-1-5003358","id":"1.5003358","articleHeadline": "Is Leonardo DiCaprio’s girlfriend simply too young for him? – Jim Duffy","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568371500000 ,"articleLead": "

Leonardo DiCaprio is known for dating women much younger than he is. So what age-gap is acceptable or unacceptable in the modern world, asks Jim Duffy.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5003357.1568303229!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Jim Duffy suspects Leonardo DiCaprio's girlfriend might 'put me right' if she reads this, but still has an issue with the relationship's age-gap (Picture: Greg Macvean)"} ,"articleBody": "

I recently watched Leonardo DiCaprio on my Netflix. The movie was called Body of Lies. A good thriller with Russell Crowe also giving a star performance. As I watched DiCaprio do his thing as a terrific actor, living his life his way, it made me think about him in general. Specifically, his private life. As a 44-year-old chap who is doing rather well, he is still not married yet.

Nothing much wrong with that these days as the institution of marriage is not as front and centre as it used to be. And one of his best mates – Brad Pitt – is going through a rather acrimonious and public split from his Mrs, so he might be hearing some horror stories. But, what I find weird about Leonardo is not that he has not tied the knot, but that his girlfriend is half his age. No, maybe weird is the wrong descriptor. Perhaps slightly wrong is a better way of putting it.

But should age feature in any scrutiny of anyone else’s relationship?

READ MORE: Why sometimes it’s okay to tell (small) lies to your partner – Jim Duffy

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The man in question doesn’t seem to have dated anyone over the age of 25. That’s his business and fair play to him. But, is there a “cut off” age-differential that common decency finds acceptable between partners?

For the record, the difference in age between me and my partner is 13 years. I’m a sprightly 52, while she is a fit 39. She is mature and worldly wise having had relationships before and experienced the world. She is ready to settle down with old grumpy drawers and accepts that we love each other and I will probably have a zimmer frame well before her.

It feels ok and right and proper as our interests align and our conversations are based on experience. Although, I do think sometimes that when I was 21, she was only eight...

And this is where it gets tricky for me as I look at Leonardo. He is 44 and his girlfriend is half his age. And when I look at my own daughters, who are her age, I think that if they walked through the door with a 44-year-old I would be a little sceptical and nervous. Wouldn’t you be? So, what is acceptable as an age difference?

And does it depend on the actual age of each person in the relationship? Let me give you some examples to cogitate. If one partner is 18, while the other is 40 is that okay? Does that sit well with you? It simply doesn’t for me.

What about if one partner is 30 and the other is 52? I can kind of get this, but I would worry a bit for the 30-year-old. Finally, what about if one partner is 40 and the other is 62? Somehow, this feels rather okay, don’t you think? So is an older persion being in a relationship with someone at the lower end of maturity in age, the actual problem?

This is why I have a slight problem with Leonardo and his younger model emphasis. Extrapolating this further, if Leonardo remains with his current partner and they grow together, I’m all good. But, if they split up and he still fishes in the sub-25 age group while he grows older, I’m not so good. Because the maturity of the younger partner comes into question the older the other partner is. There is a big disconnect here for me and it leads me to question what exactly feels right. What will 21st-century society accept?

Having had my 23-year-old daughter visit with her two girlfriends, I was trying to estimate what level of maturity they had and could they cope with a 44-year-old partner. I asked them about boys etc and they were pretty forthright. When they went out to clubs, older men chatted them up and they found this gross. I wonder if they would have felt the same way if the older man doing the chatting up had been Leonardo DiCaprio?

The laws of attraction are unique to each of us. Some guys like older women, while some women like younger guys. Just because you are attracted to someone older or younger, doesn’t class you as old, weird or perverted. There are many very happy couples of all ages and sexes who wouldn’t even consider age as a blocker, hindrance or variable in their relationship. They are attracted to each other and love each other and others will just have to get over it. Right? It’s private and personal and essentially their business. Others will always have an opinion regardless. And I do.

This is why I have a slight issue with the likes of Leonardo dating women half his age. But, maybe this is my hang-up. Maybe this is my problem and I need to reset my age calibrations a bit.

After all, I seem to have no issue with President Macron of France, aged 41, and his 66-year-old wife, Brigitte. Who, by the way, lost a whole load of friends when they got together when he was a teenager. Maybe it’s because I have daughters that I struggle with older men dating young ladies. Could I be being hypocritical as I date my fiancée 13 years my junior? You be the judge.

I am sure Leonardo’s girlfriend would put me right if she reads this. It’s her life and not mine. So, good luck to them both.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5003357.1568303229!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5003357.1568303229!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Jim Duffy suspects Leonardo DiCaprio's girlfriend might 'put me right' if she reads this, but still has an issue with the relationship's age-gap (Picture: Greg Macvean)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Jim Duffy suspects Leonardo DiCaprio's girlfriend might 'put me right' if she reads this, but still has an issue with the relationship's age-gap (Picture: Greg Macvean)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5003357.1568303229!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/scottish-ministers-urged-to-launch-review-into-trump-and-prestwick-1-5003563","id":"1.5003563","articleHeadline": "Scottish ministers urged to launch review into Trump and Prestwick","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568338912803 ,"articleLead": "The Scottish Government has been urged to launch a review into a state-owned airport's ties with the Trump Organisation and the US military after the US Air Force confirmed scores of its crews have stayed at the US president's loss making Turnberry resort during layovers in Scotland.","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5003562.1568339286!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "US Air Force crews have stayed at Trump Turnberry around 40 times since 2015."} ,"articleBody": "

Personnel from the USAF routed through Prestwick Airport stayed at Trump Turnberry on approximately 40 separate instances over the past four years, according to preliminary fundings of a USAF internal review.

That number is around ten times the number of stays previously identified through reporting by Politico, and is likely to increase pressure on the USAF to curb the use of the US president's property for crews on refuelling stops at the South Ayrshire airport.

Ross Greer, the Scottish Greens MSP, said: "The US constitution, through its emoluments clause, forbids a president from enriching themselves from their office. Donald Trump seems to be profiting from the increasingly close relationship between Prestwick airport and his hotel, particularly by US military personnel.

"Given that the US Congress has launched an investigation into these activities, there is now a clear and substantial risk to both Prestwick and Scotland’s global reputation. We could well see airport managers or even Scottish Government officials asked to testify before a Congressional committee investigating a potential breach of the law by their president."

He added: “Before this happens, the Scottish Government must launch its own review and suspend all links between the airport and both the US military and the Trump organisation. They cannot afford to be dragged into the swamp of corruption which surrounds Donald Trump.”

According to the internal review, which scrutinised 659 overnight stays by USAF crews in the vicinity of Prestwick between 2015 and 2019, approximately six per cent were booked at Turnberry.

The airport is responsible for the bookings. Scotland’s transport secretary, Michael Matheson, told Holyrood earlier this week that Turnberry was booked if other hotels were full, or if it was specifically requested.

The review indicated that three quarters (75%) of the overall overnight stays took place in the immediate vicinity of the airport.

It is understood the Mercure hotel in Ayr is among the most popular accommodation options, but that Turnberry has been requested by aircrews, in line with the protocol detailed by the Mr Mathewson.

Around a fifth (18%) of the overnight stays were at hotels in Glasgow. It is believed these are predominantly for aircrew on longer layovers.

The figures only cover USAF crew, and not other branches of the US military.

It comes as the House Oversight Committee continues to pursue an investigation into US Defence Department spending at Prestwick and Turnberry amid concerns of “serious conflicts of interest” and potential violations of the foreign emoluments clause of the US constitution.

The investigation is looking into a raft of payments to Prestwick's parent company by the Defence Logistics Agency (DLA), a Virginia based US Defence Department agency which deals with the global supply chain for the US military.

The Scotsman revealed in June - the same month the House committee launched its investigation - how the airport had received more than £9.02m from the DLA for the refuelling of military aircraft between October 2017 and March this year. It has received approximately £4.8m in the six months since for hundreds more orders.

As The Scotsman revealed earlier this week, extension to the DLA refuelling deal which was due to come into force next month has been postponed until the beginning of December at the earliest.

The DLA said the decision had nothing to do with the Congressional investigation or USAF review, and that it was ratified on 28 August. The House Oversight Committee first wrote to the Pentagon questioning the DLA deal with Prestwick on 21 June.

According to Air Force statistics between 2015 and 2019, Air Mobility Command aircraft stopped at Prestwick a total of 936 times.

The number of overnight stays has risen sharply over the period, up from 40 over the course of 2015 to 220 in the first eight months of 2019.

The USAF said standardised routing planning which identified Prestwick as a “top” location, and the fact the airport’s fixed base operation services are available around the clock, were factors in the increased traffic.

A new owner of Prestwick is expected to be announced shortly. The airport was put up for sale earlier this year. Mr Matheson has refused to rule out the sale of the heavily indebted hub to the US military, telling the Scottish Parliament that to comment on the identity of bidders would impinge on the integrity of the sale process.

" ,"byline": {"email": "martyn.mclaughlin@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Martyn McLaughlin"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5003562.1568339286!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5003562.1568339286!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "US Air Force crews have stayed at Trump Turnberry around 40 times since 2015.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "US Air Force crews have stayed at Trump Turnberry around 40 times since 2015.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5003562.1568339286!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/us-military-fuel-deal-with-prestwick-kicked-into-long-grass-over-trump-investigation-1-5002381","id":"1.5002381","articleHeadline": "US military fuel deal with Prestwick 'kicked into long grass' over Trump investigation","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568211689787 ,"articleLead": "A US Defence Department agency has postponed a lucrative new military aircraft refuelling deal with Glasgow Prestwick Airport amid multiple investigations and growing political scrutiny on both sides of the Atlantic into US military patronage and spending at the loss making hub and President Donald Trump’s flagship Scottish resort.","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5002380.1568826310!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A US Congressional committee investigation is scrutinising US Defence Department payments to President Donald Trump's Turnberry resort and Glasgow Prestwick Airport. Picture: John Devlin"} ,"articleBody": "

The Scotsman can reveal that the expanded EUCOM Into-Plane agreement covering the Scottish-Government owned airport and the US Defence Logistics Agency (DLA), which was due to come into force in a matter of weeks, has been put on hold until December at the earliest.

One source familiar with the deal said the deal was being “kicked into the long grass” as a result of a newly-disclosed investigation by the US House Oversight Committee.

However, the DLA said the decision was not related to or influenced by such developments, and said an extension to its existing contract - which subsequently pushed back the start of the new deal - had been ratified on 28 August.

While that predates the launch of an internal US Air Force inquiry, and details of the House Oversight's Committee being made public, it postdates the committee's first communications with the US Defence Department. It first wrote to the Pentagon in 21 June regarding the DLA and Prestwick deal.

The House committee is conducting a wide-ranging inquiry into the US Defence Department’s spending at Prestwick and Mr Trump’s nearby Turnberry resort over concerns of “serious conflicts of interest” and potential violations of the foreign emoluments clause of the US constitution.

It is understood one strand of the inquiry is focusing on the arrangement struck between Prestwick and the DLA, a Virginia-based body which manages the global supply chain for the US Army, Navy, and Air Force.

As The Scotsman revealed in June, the airport’s parent company, Glasgow Prestwick Airport Limited, received more than £9.02m between October 2017 and March this year for at least 644 separate aviation turbine fuel orders placed by the DLA. It has received a further £4.8m for hundreds more orders in the six months since.

With the existing deal set to expire at the end of the month, the pending extension promised to be even more gainful for the heavily indebted airport, which was put up for sale earlier this year by Scottish ministers and is reliant on the DLA for the vast majority of its revenue.

The new EUCOM deal covers not only Prestwick, but a host of European airports as far afield as Estonia, Iceland, Norway, and Poland, who supply US military aircraft with fuel.

Documentation obtained by The Scotsman shows the DLA attribute the postponement to issues with the “extensive pre-award process.”

However, sources familiar with the combat logistics support agency’s existing and future agreements with Prestwick said the controversy engulfing the airport, Trump Turnberry, and the US Defence Dept was directly to blame. .

One said the new deal has been “kicked into the long grass” in light of the increased scrutiny surrounding hub and its financial relationship the US defence apparatus.

“The DLA’s excuse for the delay is that it is slightly behind schedule in determining contract renewals. That’s nonsense,” added the source.

“They don’t want to do anything until the Congressional committee’s investigation has concluded.”

READ MORE: Greens demand Prestwick Airport not sold to US military

Prestwick, which has decades-long ties with the US military, remains an approved DLA site and is continuing to supply fuel to US aircraft in the meantime - it is understood the existing arrangement will simply continue until it is renewed.

But one source said the “political heat” meant it was likely US Air Mobility Command movements through Prestwick would reduce in number as they are routed through other European locations.

The monetary value of the planned new deal is unclear, but it is expected to surpass the terms of the existing arrangement, which is worth as much as £16.91m to Prestwick.

The debt owed by the airport to the Scottish Government stands at £38.4m. Its most recent accounts show its holding company’s annual losses total £7.6m.

It comes as Scotland’s transport secretary, Michael Matheson, today refused to rule out the sale of the airport to the US military.

Up to three offers for Prestwick are being assessed following the deadline for full bids last Friday. The sale is due to be completed early next month.

Mr Matheson told Holyrood’s connectivity committee that discussing potential bidders would “infringe on the integrity" of the sale process.

While the US Air Force (USAF) has launched its own review of the use of overseas airports and hotels, Politico reported today that Senator Gary Peters, the top Democrat on the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, has formally requested an independent investigation into the USAF’s increased use of Prestwick and overnight stays at Mr Trump’s loss making hotel, which itself remains reliant on £107m in loans.

In a letter to the Pentagon, the Michigan senator wrote: “I am disturbed by the growing number of those in government willing to engage in questionable taxpayer funded travel to and lodging at properties owned by the president - properties from which President Trump can draw income at any time.”

A spokeswoman for Glasgow Prestwick Airport said: “The existing DLA approval has been extended by two months, until 30 November 2019. This is a European wide extension and not specific to the Glasgow Prestwick Airport location.”

The DLA said it was inaccurate to describe the changed dates regarding the deal as a "delay,"

It said there were more than 60 locations across Europe that required site inspections, "extensive negotiations," and technical evaluations of various proposals in order to "eventually determine which offeror will receive a contract award for a particular location."

The DLA energy technical and contracting teams, it added, have a "limited number" of members who are working simultaneously on multiple expansive programmes with "unique challenges and demands."

Asked if the decision was influenced by or related to the Congressional inquiry surrounding Prestwick and Mr Trump, a spokesman for the DLA said: "No. This decision was made in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations."

He said the DLA anticipated awarding a long-term contract to Prestwick by the end of November, adding: "As long as the US Department of Defence customer has a requirement at that location then the DLA Energy contracting office will continue to support the mission."

READ MORE: Scottish Government-owned Prestwick Airport paid £9m by Trump administration

" ,"byline": {"email": "martyn.mclaughlin@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Martyn McLaughlin"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5002380.1568826310!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5002380.1568826310!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A US Congressional committee investigation is scrutinising US Defence Department payments to President Donald Trump's Turnberry resort and Glasgow Prestwick Airport. Picture: John Devlin","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A US Congressional committee investigation is scrutinising US Defence Department payments to President Donald Trump's Turnberry resort and Glasgow Prestwick Airport. Picture: John Devlin","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5002380.1568826310!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/columnists/donald-trump-s-second-job-lands-him-in-more-than-one-spot-of-bother-leader-comment-1-5001743","id":"1.5001743","articleHeadline": "Donald Trump’s second job lands him in more than one spot of bother – leader comment","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568178000000 ,"articleLead": "

As Scottish golf course owners go, this Donald Trump seems a bit controversial.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5001505.1568138233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry hotel and its links with US military staff and Prestwick Airport are under investigation by Congress."} ,"articleBody": "

Turns out he may have been using his second job as US President to help boost his loss-making ‘Trump Turnberry’ resort. He, of course, denies this and who would doubt him, given his reputation?

Strangely, the addition of his name to one of Scotland’s most famous courses hasn’t produced a rush of people eager for his hospitality, although a few US military personnel seem to be.

READ MORE: The growing scandal over Donald Trump and Prestwick Airport – Martyn McLaughlin

For unlimited access to Scotland’s best news, sport and expert analysis, SUBSCRIBE to The Scotsman website here

Meanwhile, it’s reported that Trump’s decision to unexpectedly reveal classified US intelligence to senior Russian officials prompted the CIA to withdraw its top spy in Moscow, fearing his cover might be blown.

Vladimir Putin may have helped get Trump elected and Trump may be trying to get Russia reinvited to the G7 summit, but any suggestion he’s a Russian stooge is surely ridiculous. Isn’t it?

Then there’s the row about whether a hurricane might hit Alabama (Trump: yes, weather forecasters: no, hurricane: no).

We feel sure he meant well, even if others think he’s a possibly traitorous buffoon who can’t read a map.

READ MORE: US military say crew stayed at Donald Trump’s Scottish resort because it was ‘least expensive option’

READ MORE: Leader comment: The Scotsman finds Donald Trump’s perfect golf partner

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5001505.1568138233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5001505.1568138233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry hotel and its links with US military staff and Prestwick Airport are under investigation by Congress.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry hotel and its links with US military staff and Prestwick Airport are under investigation by Congress.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5001505.1568138233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/apple-s-iphone-11-first-look-at-new-devise-and-video-service-1-5001817","id":"1.5001817","articleHeadline": "Apple’s iPhone 11: First look at new devise and video service","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568145017000 ,"articleLead": "

Apple unveiled new iPhones yesterday that are largely unchanged from previous models, accompanied by an unexpected price cut for the cheapest model, underscoring the company’s efforts to counteract a sales slump of its flagship product.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5001816.1568145013!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Apple unveiled new products during the event. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

The company’s new models are so similar to last year’s lineup they may be upstaged by Apple TV Plus, the company’s upcoming video service, which is rolling out on 1 November at £4.99 a month.

At a live event at its headquarters in California, Apple also confirmed its new subscription-based gaming service, Apple Arcade, will launch on September 19.

Apple Arcade will also cost £4.99 a month and will include more than 100 exclusive games at launch.

The tech giant’s chief executive Tim Cook said it was “a gaming service unlike any other out there”.

Apple also announced its latest line-up of iPhone handsets - the iPhone 11 and two versions of the iPhone 11 Pro.

All the new phones have redesigned rear camera systems and Apple’s next-generation processor - the A13 Bionic.

The iPhone 11 comes with wide and ultra-wide-angle lenses, while the larger Pro versions come with an additional telephoto lens.

The Pro comes with either a 5.8in or 6.5in screen, with the larger one to be known as the iPhone 11 Pro Max.

Mr Cook called the new devices the “most powerful and most advanced” the company has made.

Apple executive Phil Schiller added on stage that “these were the first iPhones we’ve called Pro” and there was a reason for this.

The new devices include updated camera software and hardware as well as machine learning features to take better pictures, Apple said.

The firm said it will also have longer battery life and faster-charging capabilities.

IPhone shipments are down 25 per cent so far this year, according to the research firm IDC, putting more pressure on Apple to generate revenue from services such as music, video streaming and games.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5001816.1568145013!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5001816.1568145013!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Apple unveiled new products during the event. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Apple unveiled new products during the event. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5001816.1568145013!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/calls-for-prestwick-airport-s-links-with-us-military-to-end-over-donald-trump-corruption-allegation-1-5001506","id":"1.5001506","articleHeadline": "Calls for Prestwick Airport's links with US military to end over Donald Trump 'corruption allegation'","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568135891000 ,"articleLead": "

An influential committee in the US Congress has threatened the Pentagon with subpoenas unless it releases details of US military spending at President Donald Trump’s flagship Scottish resort.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5001505.1568138233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry hotel and its links with US military staff and Prestwick Airport are under investigation by Congress."} ,"articleBody": "

In a further twist to the growing scandal surrounding the US government, Trump Turnberry and the Scottish Government-owned Glasgow Prestwick Airport, the House Oversight Committee warned it would “consider alternative measures” if the US Defence Department did not disclose details of expenditure at Mr Trump’s loss making South Ayrshire hotel and golf course.

It comes as Scottish Greens co-leader, Patrick Harvie MSP, said the airport’s dealings with the US military should be suspended, warning that otherwise the Scottish Government risked damaging the country’s international reputation

Mr Harvie told Holyrood that the House committee’s investigation into the Trump administration's potential conflicts of interest over military spending at Prestwick and his Turnberry golf resort, could see Scotland's \"good international name dragged into a corruption allegation.”

There is escalating scrutiny of stayovers at the historic resort on the Firth of Clyde by US military aircrews and an upsurge in spending at the struggling airport.

As revealed by The Scotsman, the heavily indebted hub has received approximately £14m since October 2017 via a lucrative aircraft refuelling contract with the US Defence Logistics Agency, which manages the global supply chain for the US Army, Air Force, and Navy. The deal is the airport’s single biggest revenue stream by far.

The US congressional inquiry, in tandem with an internal investigation launched by the US Air Force, has also increased pressure on the Scottish Government to disclose the extent of the airport’s relationship and revenue generation from the US military.

The House Oversight Committee initially demanded answers from the Pentagon in June, but its inquiry only became public last week via Politico reports which subsequently detailed at least four stopovers by US aircrews at Trump Turnberry since last September.

In the committee’s latest letter, issued yesterday,Democrats Elijah Cummings and Jamie Raskin proposed issuing subpoenas and stressed that Mr Trump and his firm have had “significant, direct, and detailed interactions” with the airport for years.

Citing reports in The Scotsman dating back to 2016, which revealed how the Trump Organisation negotiated room rates directly with the airport, and detailed Mr Trump personal attempts to boost passenger traffic at Prestwick they said the US president’s actions “reflect how critical this airport is to his financial bottom line.”

Mr Trump has previously denied all knowledge of air crews staying at his property, which has run up losses for four successive years under his ownership, and remains reliant on £107m of loans.

At Holyrood, Scotland’s cabinet secretary for transport, Michael Matheson, was quizzed by MSPs about the Scottish Government's knowledge of the links between Prestwick and Turnberry.

Asking Mr Matheson if it was time to \"suspend\" the relationship until the US investigation was concluded, Mr Harvie said: “Controversy around the use of Prestwick by the American military has been long-standing, including extraordinary rendition flights and active military missions. Scottish Greens have repeatedly raised this in Parliament.

“The fact its use is now being investigated by US Congress risks Scotland’s reputation being dragged into a corruption allegation. We should not stand by as Scotland’s good name is tarnished by association with the toxic Trump brand.\"

But Mr Matheson said: \"It's entirely a matter for Congress and US authorities to conduct any investigation they see as appropriate. The arrangement that Prestwick Airport has in place is to arrange accommodation as and when requested and they have 13 different hotels to provide that facility.\"

Pressed further, by Scottish Liberal Democrat MSP Mike Rumbles, he added: \"It's important to make clear that Prestwick, like all other airports providing fixed base operations, arranges overnight accommodation for aircrew when asked to do so. It uses a list of 13 hotels, some of which pay Prestwick commission. Turnberry is only booked if other hotels are unavailable or customers specifically request it.

\"There is no commercial relationship between Prestwick and Turnberry. It does not benefit from commission or in any other way from booking Turnberry and customers settle their own accounts directly with the hotel.\"

Mr Matheson said that the airport operates \"at arms length\" from the Scottish Government, and said all information on \"revenue streams is made available in annual accounts which are available online and laid in parliament.\"

But he added: \"To protect the commercial interests of the business, information on revenue is not broken down by individual customers in the published accounts.\"

He stressed that the airport's relationship with the US military was in its eighth decade and that it was a growth area. \"Since the 1930s it's been used by military for stopovers and refuelling. It's an area where there has been an increase in growth within the work that Glasgow Airport and Prestwick Airport undertake - growth in revenue from refuelling and restovers and that's a reflection of pro-active work which the management team have undertaken.\"

However, Mr Rumbles accused Mr Matheson of being either “deliberately evasive” or that “he hasn’t the foggiest clue what is going on at an airport that is costing taxpayers millions of pounds.”

He added: “The Scottish Government should come clean as to how much money they are receiving from the US military and what deals with Donald Trump’s business empire have been struck on the side.

“Michael Matheson will need to be a bit more on top of his brief if a Congressional investigation comes calling.”

The Scottish Government bought Prestwick Airport for £1 in 2013 when it was facing closure. It has also given it £40m in loans before putting it up for sale in June.

Asked about the potential sale of the airport, Mr Matheson said the management team was currently assessing bids. Mr Harvie later said the Prestwick site should be \"transitioned into a low-carbon alternative, not sold to the highest bidder.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "Gina.Davidson@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Gina Davidson and Martyn McLaughlin"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5001505.1568138233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5001505.1568138233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry hotel and its links with US military staff and Prestwick Airport are under investigation by Congress.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Donald Trump's Turnberry hotel and its links with US military staff and Prestwick Airport are under investigation by Congress.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5001505.1568138233!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/people/formula-one-world-champion-michael-schumacher-treated-with-cutting-edge-stem-cell-therapy-1-5000983","id":"1.5000983","articleHeadline": "Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher treated with cutting-edge stem-cell therapy","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568101801883 ,"articleLead": "

Seven-time Formula One world champion Michael Schumacher is being treated with a cutting-edge stem-cell therapy in a Paris hospital, according to reports in France.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5000982.1568102057!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Schumacher suffered a near-fatal brain injury in a 2013 skiing accident in the French Alps."} ,"articleBody": "

The Paris hospitals authority, citing France's strict medical privacy rules, said it could not comment on a report in Le Parisien that Schumacher was admitted under tight guard on Monday to the Georges-Pompidou hospital.

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The paper says the treatment is scheduled to be administered on Tuesday.

His long-time manager Sabine Kehm did not respond to emailed requests for comment.

Schumacher suffered a near-fatal brain injury in a 2013 skiing accident in the French Alps.

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Schumacher's condition stabilised after he was placed in a drug-induced coma, from which he later emerged.

Since September 2014, he has been cared for at home on the shores of Lake Geneva.

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5000982.1568102057!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5000982.1568102057!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Schumacher suffered a near-fatal brain injury in a 2013 skiing accident in the French Alps.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Schumacher suffered a near-fatal brain injury in a 2013 skiing accident in the French Alps.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5000982.1568102057!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/shooting-in-dutch-city-of-dordrecht-kills-three-1-5000872","id":"1.5000872","articleHeadline": "Shooting in Dutch city of Dordrecht kills three","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568055928118 ,"articleLead": "

Dutch police say 3 people killed, 1 seriously injured after a shooting in the city of Dordrecht.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5000871.1568056230!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers investigate a house after a shooting in which three people died ion Dordrecht, Netherlands. (Niels Wenstedt / ANO / AFP)"} ,"articleBody": "

Police in the Netherlands have tweeted that three people have been killed and one other person has been seriously wounded in a shooting in a residential neighbourhood in the city of Dordrecht.

Police spokesman Wim Hoonhout has told The Associated Press that \"It seems like a family incident.\" No further details of what happened Monday have been immediately released.

Photos from the scene showed a large police presence in a residential neighbourhood and at least one ambulance parked in a street as people stood in the street looking on.

Dordrecht Mayor Wouter Kolff tweeted that it was an \"extremely serious shooting\" and said he would visit the scene later in the evening.

" ,"byline": {"email": "newsdeskts@scotsman.com" ,"author": "Angus Howarth"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5000871.1568056230!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5000871.1568056230!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Police officers investigate a house after a shooting in which three people died ion Dordrecht, Netherlands. (Niels Wenstedt / ANO / AFP)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Police officers investigate a house after a shooting in which three people died ion Dordrecht, Netherlands. (Niels Wenstedt / ANO / AFP)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5000871.1568056230!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/vladimir-putin-suffers-moscow-elections-setback-as-opponents-win-big-1-5000842","id":"1.5000842","articleHeadline": "Vladimir Putin suffers Moscow elections setback as opponents win big","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568050784000 ,"articleLead": "

The party of Russian President Vladimir Putin has suffered big losses in Moscow elections as candidates endorsed by his arch-rival won almost half the seats, authorities said yesterday.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5000841.1568050781!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Russian President Vladimir Putin casts his ballot at a polling station during a city council election in Moscow. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)"} ,"articleBody": "

Elections to Moscow city council are usually low-key affairs but Sunday’s vote gained prominence when election authorities refused to register a dozen independent candidates, including well known Kremlin critics.

Their dismissal triggered major opposition protests over the summer and despite a tough police crackdown the demonstrations were the largest in Russia for years.

With all the votes counted, 20 candidates supported by opposition leader Alexei Navalny won seats on the 45-member council. All of the 20 candidates, although often nominally opposing authorities, were endorsed by Mr Navalny’s Smart Voting strategy, which called on voters to cast their ballots in order to oust the candidates of Mr Putin’s United Russia party.

“This is a terrific result and we fought for it together,” Mr Navalny said in the early hours of yesterday.

In a sign that United Russia is losing ground in Moscow, the party did not officially nominate a single candidate for the council, and all of its members or candidates affiliated with the party ran as independents, playing down their ties to the party.

United Russia nominees were seen winning governorships in several dozen regions in Sunday’s elections.

In the Far East, however, they suffered a crushing defeat. The Liberal Democratic Party won all but one seat in Khabarovsk city council and dominated in several other local elections, including the mayoral vote.

Voting in St Petersburg, Russia’s second-largest city, was marred by violations and reported election fraud.

Central Election Commission chief Ella Pamfilova said yesterday that she was aware of the reports and would look into them.

Alexander Beglov, who was endorsed by Putin, was seen winning the race for governor with 64 per cent of the vote.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov claimed that the election results showed the opposition’s idea of protest voting had largely failed.

The opposition celebrated Sunday’s election results that would cut the pro-government presence on Moscow city council from 38 to 25 but many expressed disappointment with what has been perceived as an unfair registration process.

Daria Besedina, a candidate from the liberal Yabloko party who was allowed on the ballot and won in her district, said yesterday that she would vote for the dissolution of the council when it convenes.

“We shouldn’t forget that these were not real elections – a lot of genuine [opposition] candidates who would have won were not allowed to run,” she tweeted.

“Moscow would have got an opposition council if all the candidates were registered.”

In an editorial, the Moscow Times said: “More than half of those Muscovites who turned out on Sunday were willing to support anyone except the Kremlin candidates.

“That’s a scary result for the Kremlin after this summer’s suppression.

“It means the only way it can win is by cheating and using force – not a sustainable state of affairs in the long run.”

Mr Navalny was in a jubilant mood yesterday.

In an online post, he said: “We won! Congratulations to all. I am willing to walk around Moscow and kiss everyone.

“This was the first experience of a huge and very complicated collective action on the part of voters – grassroots action.”

Dissent in Russia is ruthlessly suppressed by Mr Putin, and Mr Navalny has been arrested many times by the Russian authorities.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.5000841.1568050781!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.5000841.1568050781!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Russian President Vladimir Putin casts his ballot at a polling station during a city council election in Moscow. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Russian President Vladimir Putin casts his ballot at a polling station during a city council election in Moscow. (Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.5000841.1568050781!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/people/typhoon-batters-tokyo-knocking-out-power-and-cancelling-all-flights-1-4999967","id":"1.4999967","articleHeadline": "Typhoon batters Tokyo, knocking out power and cancelling all flights","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1568010999750 ,"articleLead": "

A typhoon blew across the Tokyo metropolitan area on Monday morning, killing one person and causing dozens of injuries, while disrupting rush-hour travel and knocking out power

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4999962.1568011688!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Several railway and subway operators suspended services and flights were cancelled at Tokyo airports as Typhoon Faxai passed over Chiba."} ,"articleBody": "

Several railway and subway operators suspended services and flights were cancelled at Tokyo airports as Typhoon Faxai passed over Chiba, a northern suburb of the Japanese capital, before daybreak, shaking homes with strong winds and battering the area with torrents of rain.

Government spokesman Yoshihide Suga told reporters that he had received a report of one death and damage caused by toppling trees and objects getting hurled through the air by the wind.

He added that some 900,000 power failures were also reported.

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The storm disrupted morning commutes and knocked over scaffolding, causing damage in a widespread area but no reported deaths.

The Japan Meteorological Agency said the typhoon reached the Pacific by late morning, exiting Japan north-east of Tokyo with winds still blowing at 40 meters per second (89 mph) with gusts up to 55 mps (123 mph).

Kyodo News Agency cited local authorities as saying at least 30 people had been hurt in Chiba, Kanagawa and Shizuoka prefectures.

The usually congested trains and major stations were even more crowded than usual once services resumed, with trains stopping temporarily and running erratically.

\"I can't go to work now, and I also had to contact my customers,\" said Tsubasa Kikuchi, a 23 year-old real estate worker, who had been waiting at Shimbashi station for more than two hours. \"This is troublesome.\"

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The weather agency warned of mudslides and flooding after the heavy rain. Kyodo reported more than 440 millimeters (17.3 inches) of rain had fallen in the city of Izu in Shizuoka prefecture in the past 24 hours.

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4999962.1568011688!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4999962.1568011688!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Several railway and subway operators suspended services and flights were cancelled at Tokyo airports as Typhoon Faxai passed over Chiba.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Several railway and subway operators suspended services and flights were cancelled at Tokyo airports as Typhoon Faxai passed over Chiba.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4999962.1568011688!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4999963.1568011690!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4999963.1568011690!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A typhoon blew across the Tokyo metropolitan area on Monday morning","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A typhoon blew across the Tokyo metropolitan area on Monday morning","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4999963.1568011690!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4999964.1568011692!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4999964.1568011692!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Government spokesman Yoshihide Suga told reporters that he had received a report of one death and damage caused by toppling trees","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Government spokesman Yoshihide Suga told reporters that he had received a report of one death and damage caused by toppling trees","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4999964.1568011692!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4999965.1568011694!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4999965.1568011694!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The storm disrupted morning commutes and knocked over scaffolding, causing damage in a widespread area but no reported deaths.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The storm disrupted morning commutes and knocked over scaffolding, causing damage in a widespread area but no reported deaths.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4999965.1568011694!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ {"video": {"brightcoveId":"3000000011199318"} } ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/world/us-military-say-crew-stayed-at-donald-trump-s-scottish-resort-because-it-was-least-expensive-option-1-4999837","id":"1.4999837","articleHeadline": "US military say crew stayed at Donald Trump's Scottish resort because it was 'least expensive option'","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1567953811619 ,"articleLead": "

US military officials are disputing a report that claims a joint Air Force and Alaska Air National Guard unit on a routine mission to Kuwait went miles out of their way just so they could spend the night at a resort in Scotland owned by President Donald Trump.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4999836.1567954052!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Military flights making stopovers in Scotland are not unusual, and there were no rooms closer to the airport, an Air Force spokesman said Saturday."} ,"articleBody": "

Politico first reported that the military transport that took off from a US base in Anchorage, Alaska, in March spent the night at the Turnberry resort, about 50 miles outside Glasgow.

The disclosure comes as Mr Trump last week denied he had any role in Vice President Mike Pence booking a room at a Trump resort in Ireland or Attorney General William Barr booking at holiday party at a Trump property in Washington, D.C., actions which Democrats and critics claim enrich the president at taxpayer’s expense.

The House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has opened an investigation into the matter.

Military flights making stopovers in Scotland are not unusual, and there were no rooms closer to the airport, an Air Force spokesman said Saturday.

“As our aircrews serve on these international airlift missions, they follow strict guidelines on contracting for hotel accommodations and all expenditures of taxpayer dollars,” Brigadier

General Edward Thomas said: “In this case, they made reservations through the Defense Travel System and used the closest available and least expensive accommodations to the airfield within the crews’ allowable hotel rates.”

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The routine airlift mission was on a C-17 shared by the Air Force and the Alaska Air National Guard, with a crew of seven.The flight took off from Anchorage on 13 March, making stops at bases in Nevada and New Hampshire before going to Glasgow Prestwick Airport and eventually Ali Al Salem base in Kuwait.

The crew was back in Alaska on 19 March.

A local government contractor made the Scotland reservations, and indicated there were no appropriately priced hotel rooms closer to the airport than the loss-making Trump resort, 54 miles away, Brig Gen Thomas said.

He added this was not an unusual distance to travel to receive the government rate for the rooms.

He said the Trump resort had rooms for $136 a night, cheaper than the Marriott, which charged $161 a night. Both are under the per diem allowance rate of $166.

“While we are still reviewing the trip records, we have found nothing that falls outside the guidelines associated with selecting stopover airports on travel routes and hotel accommodations for crew rest,” Brig Gen Thomas said.

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He said records are being reviewed, but it appears the crew stayed at a Marriott near Glasgow on its return trip to Alaska.

A recent Scotsman investigation detailed how Prestwick’s parent company has received more than £9.02m for 644 orders to refuel US Armed Forces aircraft between October 2017 and March this year.

Scotland on Sunday revealed at the weekend that in the six months since, a further slew of refuelling orders has netted Prestwick a further £4.8m.

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.mckim@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4999836.1567954052!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4999836.1567954052!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Military flights making stopovers in Scotland are not unusual, and there were no rooms closer to the airport, an Air Force spokesman said Saturday.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Military flights making stopovers in Scotland are not unusual, and there were no rooms closer to the airport, an Air Force spokesman said Saturday.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4999836.1567954052!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}