{"JP":[ {"NewsSection":{"name":"business","detaillevel":"full", "Articles": {"count":25,"detaillevel":"full","articlesList":[ {"article": { "url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/transport/loganair-to-take-over-flybmi-routes-from-aberdeen-1-4874444","id":"1.4874444","articleHeadline": "Loganair to take over flybmi routes from Aberdeen","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550430292000 ,"articleLead": "

Regional airline Loganair has said it will take over some of services provided by flybmi before it announced it was filing for administration.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874443.1550430288!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Regional airline Loganair has said it will take over some of services provided by flybmi before it announced it was filing for administration."} ,"articleBody": "

Loganair will operate flights from Aberdeen to Bristol, Oslo and Esbjerg from March 4 - describing this as a “significant expansion” of its Aberdeen base.

It comes after flybmi announced on Saturday night it has ceased operations and is filing for administration because of Brexit “uncertainty” and “spikes in fuel and carbon costs”.
Read more: All Aberdeen flybmi flights cancelled as Brexit blamed for airline’s collapse

Loganair said it would provide daily services Monday to Friday between Aberdeen and Esjberg - which is Denmark’s fifth largest city - making this the airline’s first service to the country.

Meanwhile, flights between Aberdeen and Oslo and the service from Aberdeen to Bristol will operate on weekdays as well as Sundays.

Loganair already operates 50 flights a week from Aberdeen Airport.

The airline’s managing director Jonathan Hinkles said: “It’s always really sad to see an airline go out of business and our thoughts are with all those affected - particularly staff members.

“We’re working on employment opportunities for pilots, cabin crew and engineering support staff to strengthen the Loganair team.”

He added: “There is no doubt that trading is tough but Loganair is - we believe - in the strongest position of any UK regional airline.

“We’ve done a lot of work over the last two years to secure our future as an independent regional airline and despite the challenges posed by fuel and carbon costs, and Brexit, we are strongly placed to take up new opportunities as they arise.

“Our three new routes from Aberdeen complement our existing activity across a distinct geographical area, acting as a logical fit with our network - while also markedly increasing the airline’s presence in Aberdeen.”

Read more: Flybmi suspends all flights as airline blames Brexit for collapse

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "PA Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874443.1550430288!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874443.1550430288!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Regional airline Loganair has said it will take over some of services provided by flybmi before it announced it was filing for administration.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Regional airline Loganair has said it will take over some of services provided by flybmi before it announced it was filing for administration.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874443.1550430288!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/education/glasgow-ranks-first-when-it-comes-to-students-wanting-to-stay-after-graduation-1-4874357","id":"1.4874357","articleHeadline": "Glasgow ranks first when it comes to students wanting to stay after graduation","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550389857000 ,"articleLead": "

Glasgow ranks first in Scotland and fifth in the UK when it comes to students staying on in a city after they graduate.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874356.1550389853!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Andrew Fleming at the Gallery of Modern Art. He says he fell in love with Glasgow. Picture: John Devlin"} ,"articleBody": "

New analysis by the Centre for Cities, a London-based think-tank, found 46 per cent of students in Glasgow choose to stay on after graduation, with only London, Manchester, Birmingham and Belfast having higher retention rates.

Edinburgh’s retention rate came in at 42 per cent, while Aberdeen was fractionally higher at 43 per cent. Dundee ranked at just 26 per cent.

While about a third of Glasgow graduates already lived in the city before entering university, it also does well when it comes to so-called graduate gain. This means the number of non-local graduates working in Glasgow is greater than the number of local graduates who have left the city to work elsewhere.

Creative arts, computer science and law graduates were the most likely to stay in the city.

Glasgow School of Art is top when it comes to retaining graduates, with just over half deciding to stay on after finishing their studies. Of those graduates who stay, 65 per cent were not originally from Glasgow. The proportion of retained graduates from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland who are not from Glasgow was even higher at 71 per cent.

Andrew Fleming, 25, who grew up in Kirkcaldy, left Glasgow School of Art two years ago and decided to stay on in the city to pursue his career as a silversmith.

“I’d fallen in love with the place,” he said. “It’s full of great people. I had considered moving to London, but with the ease of transport I can go down there on business and come back in a day.

“Then there’s the cost of living. I was 24 when I graduated, I had done my time living in horrible student flats. My partner is also a secondary school teacher. I was already making my life here.”

Andrew Carter, chief executive of Centre for Cities, said its analysis suggested Glasgow now needed to do more to attract graduates from other parts of the country.

“Glasgow has one of the highest student retention rates in the UK, with almost half of people who study in the city staying for work after graduation,” he said.

“While this demonstrates the strength of the city’s economy, more can be done to also attract recent graduates from elsewhere. To do this, the policy makers in Glasgow should prioritise the further expansion of high-skilled job opportunities in the city.”

The figures were compiled as part of HESA’s latest Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey.

A spokesman for Glasgow City Council said: “The findings of this report are pleasing and show Glasgow’s success in retaining our graduates and developing a highly skilled workforce that attracts global companies to locate in the city.

“However, to attract and retain both graduates and major employers, a city needs more than just world-class universities and workforces. It must also have assets such as an attractive lifestyle, competitive living and business costs, and a strong business support network – and this is where Glasgow comes into its own.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Chris McCall"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874356.1550389853!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874356.1550389853!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Andrew Fleming at the Gallery of Modern Art. He says he fell in love with Glasgow. Picture: John Devlin","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Andrew Fleming at the Gallery of Modern Art. He says he fell in love with Glasgow. Picture: John Devlin","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874356.1550389853!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/james-walker-be-a-good-neighbour-whatever-the-weather-1-4874208","id":"1.4874208","articleHeadline": "James Walker: Be a good neighbour whatever the weather","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550361042000 ,"articleLead": "

Older people and those with medical conditions are particularly vulnerable at this time of year. A cold snap can confine them to their homes or leave them feeling isolated.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874207.1550325436!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Con artists target older people disproportionately for push payment fraud and its many variations. Picture: John Devlin"} ,"articleBody": "

I popped round to check on a few such folk who live locally last week, making sure they had heating and groceries. Then it struck me that these were the very people who need extra help and advice when it comes to their finances. Here are some tips I gave them – which you should be sharing as well, in the spirit of neighbourliness.

Beating the scammers. Con artists target older people disproportionately for “push payment” fraud and its many variations. Take a little time to warn the people you know about how these scams work. Remember the golden rule: no business should ever contact you and ask for personal details or passwords – and you should never, ever transfer money to an account because a stranger “in authority” asks you to do so.

A tax on loyalty. I’ve written a lot about “loyalty tax”, where businesses such as insurance companies or broadband providers increase your bills each month. Again, the worst examples I’ve seen have all involved pensioners who stayed loyal to businesses and ended up paying hundreds – and in some cases thousands – more than their neighbours. Talking about money and personal spending with friends and neighbours is never easy. But why not frame the conversation around savings rather than asking about what people are personally paying, and offer to help?

Switching. Research has indicated that older people are more likely to be stuck on fixed tariff energy bills (the most expensive ones). Winter and heating bills are some of the leading concerns expressed by older people, so now is a good time to see 
if you can help get a better deal for an older friend or relative.

◆ Complaints. We Brits aren’t that big on complaining. However, when you get talking to a friend or neighbour, it’s usually clear that there are some niggles that might actually be having a very real impact on their lives. So why not help them make a complaint? It’s dead easy and it can provide some very real support to those who need it. The same goes for making claims on things like PPI or refund requests.

Emergencies. Older people, or those dealing with a significant medical condition, should have people from the council or health services visiting their properties. Where you can, why not introduce yourself and find out what they suggest should there be an emergency? It’s not always practical for people to use a mobile phone, but they may have alarms or other ways to request help in emergencies. Some support services recommend key drop boxes so carers can access the property regularly or if there’s a problem. Having access to a code to the key box is more practical than having a set of keys, as you can pass on the code to emergency services if you’re not at home (once you’ve confirmed their identity).

Taking a little time to help people at this time of year is much easier than you might think. Together, we can make society a little better, a step at a time. So speak up and seek out those who might be struggling. You won’t regret it.

James Walker is the founder of online complaint-resolution service Resolver.co.uk

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "James Walker"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874207.1550325436!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874207.1550325436!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Con artists target older people disproportionately for push payment fraud and its many variations. Picture: John Devlin","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Con artists target older people disproportionately for push payment fraud and its many variations. Picture: John Devlin","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874207.1550325436!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/bill-jamieson-look-away-if-you-want-to-see-a-picture-of-fear-and-foreboding-1-4874204","id":"1.4874204","articleHeadline": "Bill Jamieson: Look away if you want to see a picture of fear and foreboding","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550360694000 ,"articleLead": "

A stream of good news continues. Sorry, I’ll write that again. You might not have believed it the first time: a stream of good news.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874203.1550325398!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "From inflation to retail sales to property, the future looks bright. Photograph: Getty/iStockphoto"} ,"articleBody": "

Really? For business and the economy? It could scarcely be worse. Across the UK, the economy recorded its slowest annual growth in six years in 2018. Growth was 1.4 per cent, down from 1.8 per cent in 2017 and the slowest rate since 2012. According to the Office for National Statistics, quarterly growth also slowed, falling to 0.2 per cent in the three months to December – down from 0.6 per cent in the three months to September.

Growth forecasts for Scotland and the UK have been cut. On the Continent, it is no better, with Eurozone growth even worse than in the UK and Germany on the brink of recession. The world economy is slowing. And overhanging everything is the relentless political shenanigans of Brexit, with no apparent way out of the morass.

Even more prolonged uncertainty is a killer for business. Investment plans have been pulled and expansion put on ice. Much more of this and recession is a distinct possibility.

And yet, amid all of this, there is good news, hard though it can be to discern. So heavy is the dosage of Brexit warnings that accompany most pronouncements, it is more often the warnings, not the real data, that leave the greatest impression.

It is not my intention here to dismiss these warnings, or minimise the damage that prolonged uncertainty is inflicting on business; rather to correct the imbalance.

First – and particularly heartening in view of the fall in sterling, down 12 per cent against the dollar and 14 per cent against the euro since the 2016 EU referendum – inflation has declined to a two-year low, rising by just 1.8 per cent last month, compared with 2.1 per cent in December.

Inflation peaked at a five-year high of 3.1 per cent in November 2017. The fall comes as the latest data shows wages rising by 3.3 per cent. The fall is due mainly to cheaper gas, electricity and the price of petrol down by 2.1 per cent a litre between December and January because of falling crude oil prices.

With average wages now further outpacing inflation, this may help explain why last month proved markedly better than expected in the high street. Latest figures from the Scottish Retail Consortium and KPMG show retail sales grew year-on-year by 2.2 per cent in January.

This is the strongest rise recorded since last June, when there was an increase of 2.7 per cent, helped by warm weather. The largest increase was seen in food sales, up by 4.9 per cent, with the New Year and Burns night celebrations cited as key factors.

There was a more modest year-on-year increase in non-food sales, with a rise of 0.2 per cent, compared with a fall of 2.8 per cent in December. “Following a dreary December for retailers, January brought a glimmer of hope,” said Paul Martin from KPMG.

As for the UK overall, the ONS reports that retail sales also bounced back sharply in January, rising by one per cent on the previous month, after a 0.7 per cent decline in December.

Compared with a year ago, retail sales are running 4.2 per cent higher. The figures recorded the biggest annual increase since December 2016 and beat most analysts’ expectations.

Meanwhile, Scotland’s whisky exports continue to go from strength to strength. Analysis of HMRC data by the Scotch Whisky Association found exports grew 7.8 per cent by value to £4.7 billion last year. The number of bottles exported also reached record levels, growing by 3.6 per cent to 1.28 billion.

Also released last week were figures showing Scotland’s international exports excluding oil and gas rose by £1.9bn to £32.4bn in 2017, the highest annual growth rate (6.2 per cent) since 2011. The increase was driven by a rise in manufacturing exports, including food and drink, while exports of services also increased.

And updated GDP statistics, released on the same day, show that Scotland’s GDP grew by 0.2 per cent in the third quarter of 2018, and has increased in every quarter since the start of 2017.

This prompted a whoop of delight from Finance Secretary Derek Mackay (Scotland’s Brexit Secretary Mike “We’re all doomed” Russell perhaps having been temporarily gagged and tethered backstage that day).

“It’s great news,” declared Mackay, “that Scotland’s economy and international exports both continue to grow,” adding that the data followed on the heels of unemployment figures being the lowest on record at 3.6 per cent.

“Our manufacturing sector, including food and drink, is performing particularly well and it is encouraging to see increasing international interest in our service sector”.

Meanwhile, from that stricken wreck that is Royal Bank of Scotland, has come news of profits recovering to £1.62bn last year, more than double the £752 million previously recorded. Having cleaned up its balance sheet, and resolved its issue with US authorities, the bank paid its first dividend in a decade in 2018. The £1.6bn dividend announced last week dwarfs the £241m paid out last year and is enough to put RBS back among the UK’s top 15 payers. It comprises a final dividend of 3.5p per share, and also a 7.5p special dividend, which means the Treasury is set to receive £977m.

Finally, some encouraging news from the housing market. The number of homes repossessed in the UK fell to its lowest level since 1980 last year, according to industry figures. Low mortgage rates and a less aggressive attitude from lenders has meant low levels of repossession in recent years. Mortgage arrears among homeowners have also been falling.

And here in Scotland, average house prices have continued to rise – despite Brexit. According to the latest data from Registers of Scotland, the price of an average home in Scotland in December was £183,968, up by £9,000 or five per cent since January 2018. Sales volumes at 9,444 in December compare with 6,240 last January.

There is fear and foreboding a-plenty, and deep uncertainty to contend with – but signs of resilience, too, amid the gloom.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Bill Jamieson"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874203.1550325398!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874203.1550325398!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "From inflation to retail sales to property, the future looks bright. Photograph: Getty/iStockphoto","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "From inflation to retail sales to property, the future looks bright. Photograph: Getty/iStockphoto","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874203.1550325398!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/media-leisure/bank-of-scotland-results-overshadowed-by-brexit-1-4874220","id":"1.4874220","articleHeadline": "Bank of Scotland results overshadowed by Brexit","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550358819000 ,"articleLead": "

Bank of Scotland owner Lloyds will report a sharp rise in annual profits this week but the impact of Brexit uncertainties on current trading will be the main focus of analysts’ attention.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874219.1550326515!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Investors will want to know how the bank is holding up amid growing signs of a weakening in consumer confidence."} ,"articleBody": "

Investors will want to know how the group – the UK’s biggest mortgage lender – is holding up amid growing signs of a weakening in consumer confidence.

“The domestic lending space isn’t as rosy as it once was and while unemployment and interest rates remain low – usually good news for lenders – it’s important bad loans and default levels aren’t creeping up,” said Sophie Lund-Yates, equity analyst at Hargreaves Lansdown.

City analysts expect the banking giant to see pre-tax profits rise by more than 20 per cent to £6.4 billion when it reports on Wednesday.

Lloyds will also be eager to provide an update on the first year of its £3bn transformation programme.

The high-street bank is in the midst of a three-year strategy to revamp its banking app, digitise processes by 2020, and scale its financial planning and retirement businesses. The increased investment to boost its digital offering is to counter the threat posed by new challenger banks.

Pay details for top bosses are also expected to be released this week. Last year, chief executive Antonio Horta-Osorio’s total package rose 11 per cent to £6.4 million.

Elsewhere in the sector, Barclays is set to reveal a steep fall in annual profits on Thursday as it counts the cost of litigation charges and bad loans. It comes as Barclays faces the threat of activist investor Edward Bramson muscling his way on to the board.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "PERRY GOURLEY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874219.1550326515!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874219.1550326515!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Investors will want to know how the bank is holding up amid growing signs of a weakening in consumer confidence.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Investors will want to know how the bank is holding up amid growing signs of a weakening in consumer confidence.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874219.1550326515!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/if-you-want-to-thwart-financial-abuse-first-spot-the-warning-signs-1-4874206","id":"1.4874206","articleHeadline": "If you want to thwart financial abuse, first spot the warning signs","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550358571000 ,"articleLead": "

Imagine if you couldn’t access your money, or get a job without someone else’s permission – or if another person was racking up debts in your name.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874205.1550325429!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The My Money, My Life campaign suggested 18 per cent of adults in the UK had been a victim of financial abuse. Photograph: PA"} ,"articleBody": "

Horrible, right? But financial abuse may be more common than you think, and financial services firms are highlighting the help available for those affected, to start taking back control over their money.

Trade association UK Finance has published a leaflet with information on this topic, which services provider firms are placing on their websites. This follows a financial abuse code of practice – providing guidance for banks and building societies so customers can be confident they will be treated sympathetically – that was announced last year. The My Money, My Life campaign suggested 18 per cent of adults in the UK had been a victim of financial abuse in a current or past relationship.

To help highlight the issue and encourage people to speak up, here are some of the warning signs of financial abuse, plus ways to get help.

What is financial abuse?

It could happen when someone tries to take control of your finances, exploit them or sabotage them. The person doing this may be a partner, a family member, or someone outside the family, such as a carer.

Who’s at risk?

While it can happen to anyone, for some people it could take place alongside other forms of abuse, where someone is trying to gain control over another person, such as violence. The Co-op Bank and Refuge’s research found 60 per cent of cases were reported by women and in 82 per cent of cases, victims had also experienced other forms of abuse. Older people may also be particularly at risk, and people with dementia may be targeted.

What are the warning signs?

Someone may have stopped you from being able to work or go to university, or prevented you from being able to access your money. They may have taken out credit cards or loans in your name without your permission, or asked you to change your will. You may have had your money spent by someone else without your authorisation. Perhaps someone said they would pay bills or buy shopping for you – but despite you giving them money, this hasn’t happened.

How your bank or other provider may be able to help

If you are in immediate danger, you should call the police. And if it’s safe to do so, ask to speak to someone at your financial services provider about what is happening. They can help you to keep your finances safe, which could involve setting up a new PIN and passwords on your account if you think someone else knows them.

If someone is opening your post at home, you may be able to have letters sent elsewhere, or consider receiving your statements online.

If you have a joint account with an ex and you’re worried about cash being drained out, you could ask your provider that payments do not come out of the account without both you and the other joint account holder saying so. You may consider closing the joint account – but remember you’re both responsible for any overdrawn balance.

More help and support is available from charities such as Refuge, StepChange Debt Charity, Citizens Advice and the Money Advice Trust.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Vicky Shaw"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874205.1550325429!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874205.1550325429!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The My Money, My Life campaign suggested 18 per cent of adults in the UK had been a victim of financial abuse. Photograph: PA","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The My Money, My Life campaign suggested 18 per cent of adults in the UK had been a victim of financial abuse. Photograph: PA","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874205.1550325429!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/media-leisure/travel-firm-targets-expansion-in-spanish-cities-1-4874216","id":"1.4874216","articleHeadline": "Travel firm targets expansion in Spanish cities","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550358475000 ,"articleLead": "

An Edinburgh-based travel firm that organises short-stay language immersion trips focused on Spain is adding new destinations to its offering.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874215.1550326193!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Pack Language Experience was founded by Spaniards Ana Sanz and Adrian Lago"} ,"articleBody": "

The Pack Language Experience was founded by Spaniards Adrian Lago and Ana Sanz. Lago said they wanted to tap into their adult pupils’ interest in Spanish culture and desire to improve their knowledge of the language.

The programmes entail Spanish lessons followed by activities, cultural trips, and dinners, and last five to seven days with four to ten participants.

The first was in 2016 to Madrid, and the firm is this year adding Asturias in the north of Spain and Sierra de Guadarrama in the centre.

Having been assisted by Business Gateway, it is also moving into trips to Edinburgh for people to improve their English. Other destinations being mulled over include Andalusia in the south of Spain, and Lago outlined plans to add staff.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "emma newlands"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874215.1550326193!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874215.1550326193!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The Pack Language Experience was founded by Spaniards Ana Sanz and Adrian Lago","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Pack Language Experience was founded by Spaniards Ana Sanz and Adrian Lago","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874215.1550326193!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/transport/all-aberdeen-flybmi-flights-cancelled-as-brexit-blamed-for-airline-s-collapse-1-4874347","id":"1.4874347","articleHeadline": "All Aberdeen flybmi flights cancelled as Brexit blamed for airline’s collapse","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550358107000 ,"articleLead": "

All flybmi flights to and from Aberdeen have been cancelled after the airline filed for administration.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874346.1550354297!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Flybmi's collapse has resulted in all the airline's Aberdeen flights being cancelled. Picture: Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

However, sister carrier Loganair said it was unaffected and its flights would continue as normal.

The Scotsman understands Loganair may announce shortly it is taking over some of flybmi’s routes.

Both airlines are owned by Airline Investments Limited, which was previously based in Aberdeen.

The immediate cancellation of all flybmi flights, including the three served by Aberdeen International, was announced on Saturday night.

The airline blamed Brexit for its collapse and in a statement said: “We sincerely regret that this course of action has become the only option open to us, but the challenges, particularly those created by Brexit, have proven to be insurmountable.”

READ MORE: Flybmi suspends all flights as airline blames Brexit for collapse

Flybmi had flights between Aberdeen and Esbjerg in Denmark, Oslo in Norway and Bristol.

On Sunday, the 11:05am flight to Oslo and the 3:35pm flight to Bristol have been cancelled.

Two flights due to arrive in Aberdeen from Oslo and Bristol are also cancelled.

Flybmi operated 17 aircraft on routes between 25 European cities, with the East Midlands-based firm employing 376 people in the UK, Belgium, Germany and Sweden.

Customers who had booked flights with flybmi are advised to contact their credit or debit card provider, or their travel agent, to get a refund.

A flybmi spokesman said: “It is with a heavy heart that we have made this unavoidable announcement today.

“The airline has faced several difficulties, including recent spikes in fuel and carbon costs, the latter arising from the EU’s recent decision to exclude UK airlines from full participation in the Emissions Trading Scheme.

“These issues have undermined efforts to move the airline into profit.

“Current trading and future prospects have also been seriously affected by the uncertainty created by the Brexit process, which has led to our inability to secure valuable flying contracts in Europe and lack of confidence around bmi’s ability to continue flying between destinations in Europe.

“Additionally, our situation mirrors wider difficulties in the regional airline industry which have been well documented.

“Against this background, it has become impossible for the airline’s shareholders to continue their extensive programme of funding into the business, despite investment totalling over £40 million in the last six years.

“Our employees have worked extremely hard over the last few years and we would like to thank them for their dedication to the company, as well as all our loyal customers who have flown with us over the last six years.”

A Loganair spokesman said: “It’s business as usual, with all flights operating tomorrow and thereafter for Loganair.

“We have done a lot of work to put Loganair onto a sound financial footing in last 12 months despite the wider issues in the sector.”

The company added: “The two airlines are separate businesses, operating separate aircraft fleets on their own distinct route networks.

“As such, the closure of bmi Regional – which flew Embraer Regional Jet aircraft on routes throughout 12 European countries – has no impact on Loganair’s continued operation, which predominantly uses turboprop aircraft on routes within the UK and in particular to, from and within the Scottish Highlands and Islands.

“The same challenges that have led to bmi Regional ceasing operations, including uncertainty around intra-European traffic rights post-Brexit, do not impact Loganair’s business.”

Loganair managing director Jonathan Hinkles said: “Loganair expects to return to profit in the current financial year, is carrying record passenger numbers on many of its routes and is in a strong financial position.

“We are actively working on options to offer employment to a number of bmi Regional staff members, whilst at the same time monitoring developments elsewhere in the UK regional airline sector which could present opportunities for Loganair.”

Rory Boland, Which? travel editor, said: “This is terrible news for flybmi passengers, who will be seeking urgent advice on what steps to take.

“Some customers have claimed that tickets were being sold in the hours before the airline went bust, knowing full well those tickets would never be honoured, and passengers will rightly be outraged if this is proved to be the case.

“As all future flights have been cancelled, flybmi customers should explore their options for refunds.

“If you purchased your flight as part of a package, you should be ATOL protected, which means you should get a refund.

“However, if you didn’t book as part of a package, you may be able to claim the cost back through your travel insurance or credit card issuer, but it depends on your circumstances.”

Brian Strutton, general secretary of the British Air Line Pilots Association (Balpa), said: “The collapse of flybmi is devastating news for all employees.

“Regrettably, Balpa had no warning or any information from the company.

“Our immediate steps will be to support flybmi pilots and explore with the directors and administrators whether their jobs can be saved.”

Tim Alderslade, Chief Executive of Airlines UK, which represents 13 UK carriers, said: “Today’s announcement demonstrates once again the ferociously competitive environment airlines operate in.

“It should give Government – and other parts of the industry who relentlessly champion passenger growth but too frequently neglect the challenges carriers face – pause for thought about the costs they are asking airlines to absorb and to what extent this is sustainable into the future.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "ALASTAIR DALTON"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874346.1550354297!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874346.1550354297!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Flybmi's collapse has resulted in all the airline's Aberdeen flights being cancelled. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Flybmi's collapse has resulted in all the airline's Aberdeen flights being cancelled. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874346.1550354297!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/this-5m-castle-in-ravelston-has-been-named-alongside-the-uk-s-most-unloved-homes-1-4874351","id":"1.4874351","articleHeadline": "This £5m castle in Ravelston has been named alongside the UK’s most ‘unloved’ homes","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550351242000 ,"articleLead": "

AN Edinburgh castle which once hosted the likes of Charles Dickens, Hans Christian Andersen and Sir Walter Scott, has been included in a list of Britain’s most ‘unloved’ properties after its asking price dropped by £1 million.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874348.1550352858!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Craigcrook Castle has remained unsold for a number of years. Picture: Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

Situated in the affluent Ravelston area of the Capital, Craigcrook Castle went on the market in 2014 for the first time in almost three centuries.

With its handsome turrets and beautiful gardens, the 16th century pile was put for sale with an asking price of £6 million.

READ MORE: The five most expensive homes for sale in Scotland

READ MORE: Urban castle to be Edinburgh’s priciest property

But now after half a decade without a buyer, it seems the five-bedroom, three-storey stately home is struggling with its lofty price tag and has been included in a list of the UK’s most unloved properties.

Online estate agents Housesimple.com researched property markets in 100 major towns and cities, to find houses or flats that have been on the market for years without budging.

One house in the Anfield are of Liverpool was first listed for sale in April 2010 for £145,000, and even a £10,000 price drop hasn’t tempted any buyers to date.

It’s a similar sorry tale for a two-bed flat in Darlington, County Durham, which was first listed in May 2010 for £145,000. Despite the owners dropping the price by 17%, eight years have passed and buyers are a little thin on the ground. While, a one-bed flat in Middlesbrough, on at £36,995, has had its price dropped seven times; but even a 33% cut in the initial list price, hasn’t seen a sold board go up outside.

But of course it’s not just the cheaper properties that are struggling to find buyers.

A five-bedroom house in Sandbanks, Poole, known for being one of the most expensive coastal real estates in the world, has been on the market for almost five years. It was reduced in price by half a million pounds in December 2018.

And Edinburgh’s own Craigcrook Castle has also dropped in value, with its original £6 million asking price reduced by £1m last July.

The Grade B Listed property had passed hands a number of times before John Strachan acquired the castle and left it to the Craigcrook Mortification Trust in 1719.

Since then, it has hosted such illustrious visitors as Alfred Lord Tennyson, Hans Christian Andersen, Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Sir Walter Scott.

All visited when the castle was owned by Lord Jeffrey, founder of the Edinburgh Review.

Parts of the castle were also remodelled by William Playfair, the architect of Edinburgh’s New Town.

In recent years, the castle has been let on a long lease for commercial purposes and in the 1970s, a single storey annex was added to the eastern wing of the castle. Since this period, the castle has been used as offices.

Legendary artist and arts promoter Richard Demarco kept his archives at the property.

According to research by Housesimple, the UK’s 20 most unloved properties* have been on the market between 57 months and just under nine years. Seven properties have been on the market since 2010 and nine of the ten homes that have been listed for the longest period of time, are located in the north of England.

Sam Mitchell, CEO of online estate agents HouseSimple.com, comments: “There are a number of reasons why a home might not sell quickly; from macroeconomic factors to the condition of the property and the initial marketed price. There is not much a seller can do about the economic climate. All they can do is give themselves the best possible chance of finding a buyer whatever is happening in the wider property market and the global economy. And a property should sell in any climate if it is marketed correctly.

“A good estate agent should find you a buyer, but it’s still worth doing your own research before listing your property. Homeowners can easily find out what properties are selling for in their area to make sure theirs is priced accurately for the market. And once your property is listed, it’s important to keep on top of how viewings are going. Ensure you have access to performance reports, to check not just how many viewings you’ve had but what feedback buyers are giving, such as the price is too high, or the interior feels a little tired.

“Don’t forget, it’s vital your property views well both online and offline. You need high-quality photos online as scrolling through pages on a property portal is likely to be the first time a potential buyer will see your property. And make sure your home is clean and tidy, and free of clutter when people actually come round to view. Potential buyers make quick decisions on a property, and you want the first impression to be a positive one.

“If you have a buyer who is considering making an offer, but is wavering on the price, then be willing to negotiate to push the sale over the line. If it’s a matter of a few thousand pounds to secure a sale, then weigh up whether you can afford to take a lower offer. It’s likely that you will be able to cover it by negotiating a lower price on the home you’re buying.”

The following table shows the 20 UK properties that have been on the market the longest period of time:

• Anfield, Liverpool

£134,950/3-bed semi-detached house

12/04/2010

• Darlington, County Durham

North East

£120,000/2-bed flat

05/05/2010

• Whiston, Rotherham

£624,999/5-bed detached house

20/08/2010

• Cramlington, Newcastle-upon-Tyne

£69,950/1-bed bungalow

30/09/2010

• Chesterfield

£120,000/2-bed semi-detached

29/10/2010

• Blackburn, Lancashire

£110,000/3-bed bungalow

18/11/2010

• Lakeside, Doncaster

£120,000/3-bed flat

18/11/2010

• Whalley Range, Manchester

£330,000/2-bed flat

29/07/2011

• Dore, Sheffield

£750,000/4-bed house

13/10/2011

• Ormesby, Middlesbrough

£36,995/1-bed flat

12/01/2012

• Commonhead, Glasgow

£49,000/1-bed flat

05/04/2012

• Farnworth, Bolton

£59,000/1-bed flat

19/04/2012

• Wakefield

£109,950/2-bed terraced

11/08/2012

• Worsbrough, Barnsley

£450,000/4 bed house

25/08/2012

• Edlington, Doncaster

£52.950/3-bed terraced house

03/05/2013

• Gateshead

£400,000/3 bed flat

22/05/2013

• Norwich

£250,000/4 bed end terrace house

04/09/2013

• Bishop Cuthbert, Hartlepool

£410,000/4 bed detached house

23/01/2014

• Sandbanks, Poole

£5,995,000/5 bed detached house

22/03/2014

• Ravelston, Edinburgh

£5,000,000/5 bed Craigcrook Castle

13/05/2014

Join our Facebook group Our Edinburgh to share images and news from and around the Capital

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874348.1550352858!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874348.1550352858!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Craigcrook Castle has remained unsold for a number of years. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Craigcrook Castle has remained unsold for a number of years. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874348.1550352858!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874349.1550352861!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874349.1550352861!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The stately home dates from the 16th century.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The stately home dates from the 16th century.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874349.1550352861!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874350.1550352864!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874350.1550352864!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Richard Demarco kept his archives at the castle. Picture: Gareth Easton","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Richard Demarco kept his archives at the castle. Picture: Gareth Easton","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874350.1550352864!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/flybmi-suspends-all-flights-as-airline-blames-brexit-for-collapse-1-4874342","id":"1.4874342","articleHeadline": "Flybmi suspends all flights as airline blames Brexit for collapse","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550345600000 ,"articleLead": "

Airline flybmi has suspended flights and is filing for administration, blaming uncertainty around Brexit.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874341.1550345949!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The regional airline has cancelled all operations. Picture: Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

The airline, which had operated 17 regional jet aircraft on routes to 25 European cities and served Aberdeen as its only Scottish destination, said all flights were cancelled from Saturday.

Difficulties have included increases in fuel and carbon costs, as well as challenges “particularly those created by Brexit”, a statement on the airline’s website said.

A total of 376 employees based in the UK, Germany, Sweden and Belgium are employed by bmi Regional.

The statement said: “It is with a heavy heart that we have made this unavoidable announcement today.

“The airline has faced several difficulties, including recent spikes in fuel and carbon costs, the latter arising from the EU’s recent decision to exclude UK airlines from full participation in the Emissions Trading Scheme. These issues have undermined efforts to move the airline into profit.

“Current trading and future prospects have also been seriously affected by the uncertainty created by the Brexit process, which has led to our inability to secure valuable flying contracts in Europe and lack of confidence around bmi’s ability to continue flying between destinations in Europe.

“Additionally, our situation mirrors wider difficulties in the regional airline industry which have been well documented.

“Against this background, it has become impossible for the airline’s shareholders to continue their extensive programme of funding into the business, despite investment totalling over £40 million in the last six years.

“We sincerely regret that this course of action has become the only option open to us, but the challenges, particularly those created by Brexit, have proven to be insurmountable.”

Customers have been advised to contact their payment card issuer to get a refund for flights, while those who have booked through a travel agent or partner airlines are advised to contact their agent or airline for details of their options.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874341.1550345949!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874341.1550345949!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The regional airline has cancelled all operations. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The regional airline has cancelled all operations. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874341.1550345949!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/lifestyle/15-edinburgh-department-stores-that-are-gone-but-not-forgotten-1-4874332","id":"1.4874332","articleHeadline": "15 Edinburgh department stores that are gone but not forgotten","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550343612000 ,"articleLead": "

EDINBURGH once boasted a raft of large ‘shopping palaces’ along its main thoroughfares, but the vast majority have bit the dust in recent decades.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874316.1550346322!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Traffic lights system at West End Edinburgh - People watch new system from barrier in Princes Street. Shops in the background are Binns and Alex Ferguson."} ,"articleBody": "

With a plethora of different department stores to choose from the shopping experience of yesteryear in central Edinburgh was markedly different than it is today. As the building that was once home to Fraser’s flagship Edinburgh store at the West End prepares to undergo a multi-million pound transformation into a world-class whisky tourism hub for Johnnie Walker, we take a look back at the Capital’s long list of lost department stores that are gone but not forgotten.

Join our Facebook group Our Edinburgh to share images and news from and around the Capital

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874316.1550346322!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874316.1550346322!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Traffic lights system at West End Edinburgh - People watch new system from barrier in Princes Street. Shops in the background are Binns and Alex Ferguson.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Traffic lights system at West End Edinburgh - People watch new system from barrier in Princes Street. Shops in the background are Binns and Alex Ferguson.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874316.1550346322!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874317.1550346329!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874317.1550346329!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Darling's department store, owned by former Edinburgh Lord Provost William Y Darling, was renowned for its high fashion in dresses, suits and hats.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Darling's department store, owned by former Edinburgh Lord Provost William Y Darling, was renowned for its high fashion in dresses, suits and hats.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874317.1550346329!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874318.1550346333!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874318.1550346333!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Patrick Thomson's opened at North Bridge in 1906 and lasted until 1982, by which time owners House of Fraser had changed its name to Arnott's.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Patrick Thomson's opened at North Bridge in 1906 and lasted until 1982, by which time owners House of Fraser had changed its name to Arnott's.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874318.1550346333!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874319.1550346338!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874319.1550346338!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Binns department store at the West End was rebranded as Fraser's in the 1970s.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Binns department store at the West End was rebranded as Fraser's in the 1970s.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874319.1550346338!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874320.1550346342!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874320.1550346342!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "C & A Modes was destroyed by fire in November 1955. The store was later rebuilt but closed in the early 2000s.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "C & A Modes was destroyed by fire in November 1955. The store was later rebuilt but closed in the early 2000s.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874320.1550346342!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874321.1550346345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874321.1550346345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Grants at North Bridge which had the first escalator in Edinburgh installed in 1959.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Grants at North Bridge which had the first escalator in Edinburgh installed in 1959.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874321.1550346345!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874322.1550346351!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874322.1550346351!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Peter Allans occupied a long stretch of South Bridge for decades.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Peter Allans occupied a long stretch of South Bridge for decades.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874322.1550346351!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874323.1550346355!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874323.1550346355!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Leith Provident Co-op Society later became a Scotmid, since demolished.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Leith Provident Co-op Society later became a Scotmid, since demolished.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874323.1550346355!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874324.1550346360!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874324.1550346360!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "BHS' flagship store on Princes Street opened in the sixties and last until the company went defunct in 2016.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "BHS' flagship store on Princes Street opened in the sixties and last until the company went defunct in 2016.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874324.1550346360!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874325.1550346365!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874325.1550346365!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Two big Princes Street stores for the price of one: John Menzies, newsagents and stationers, and Smalls department store.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Two big Princes Street stores for the price of one: John Menzies, newsagents and stationers, and Smalls department store.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874325.1550346365!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874326.1550346370!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874326.1550346370!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "R W Forsyth was a rival to Jenners at one time but closed in 1982.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "R W Forsyth was a rival to Jenners at one time but closed in 1982.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874326.1550346370!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874327.1550346375!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874327.1550346375!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The Woolworth department store on Princes Street remains fondly recalled by Edinburgh locals of a certain age. It closed in 1984.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The Woolworth department store on Princes Street remains fondly recalled by Edinburgh locals of a certain age. It closed in 1984.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874327.1550346375!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874328.1550346378!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874328.1550346378!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Aerial of the Tollcross area, showing Goldbergs department store. It closed in 1991.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Aerial of the Tollcross area, showing Goldbergs department store. It closed in 1991.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874328.1550346378!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874329.1550346383!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874329.1550346383!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Blyths was popular among shoppers in the Tollcross area in the 1960s.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Blyths was popular among shoppers in the Tollcross area in the 1960s.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874329.1550346383!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874330.1550346387!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874330.1550346387!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Parker's department store with its mock-Tudor frontage was demolished in the early seventies as Edinburgh University moved forward with expansion plans.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Parker's department store with its mock-Tudor frontage was demolished in the early seventies as Edinburgh University moved forward with expansion plans.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874330.1550346387!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874331.1550346392!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874331.1550346392!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Littlewoods' store on Princes Street endured until the late 2000s.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Littlewoods' store on Princes Street endured until the late 2000s.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874331.1550346392!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/media-leisure/the-big-interview-st-andrews-old-course-hotel-general-manager-helen-mcbride-1-4874202","id":"1.4874202","articleHeadline": "The Big Interview: St Andrews Old Course Hotel general manager Helen McBride","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550325322000 ,"articleLead": "

My family keeps telling me I should write a book,” laughs Helen McBride, saying her near three decades working in hospitality – including a stint at Sir Richard Branson’s tropical paradise Necker Island – have provided days at work she’s told could only happen in her world.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874201.1550326222!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "'We'll always continue to explore ways to be attractive to all different clients,' says Helen McBride. 'And no business is going to want to have just one stream of revenue.'"} ,"articleBody": "

One anecdote relates to the Old Course Hotel, Golf Resort & Spa in St Andrews, where she has been general manager since July, when a golf ball smashed through one window and out another, narrowly missing a waiter’s head in the process.

The renowned Fife resort bills itself as one of the most luxurious destinations of its kind in the world, and has thankfully played host to far more accomplished players.

Indeed, golfing great Tiger Woods is among those to have stayed at the hotel, which has 144 rooms including 35 suites as well as the first Kohler spa outside the US, with 13 treatment rooms. There are 11 golf courses in the immediate vicinity including its own championship course – The Duke’s – and the resort borders the 17th Road Hole of the Old Course.

It is part of Wisconsin-headquartered global plumbing giant Kohler Company, in which Herb Kohler is the executive chairman.

The group was founded in 1873, and describes itself as one of America’s oldest and largest privately held companies. Among its portfolio is championship golf course Whistling Straits that welcomed the PGA Championship in 2004 and 2010, and will host the 2020 Ryder Cup.

Returning to this side of the Atlantic, St Andrews is very close to Herb Kohler’s heart, says McBride, who arrived just before it in January 2017 embarked on a three-and-a-half-month refurbishment, which saw bedrooms revamped and the spa extended.

She had joined as head of food and beverage, progressing to resident manager, and then assuming her current role, now leading a team that can reach 400 in peak season.

Kohler Company has a wholly owned subsidiary, Kohler Scotland Limited, which owns 99.8 per cent of The Old Course Limited, which in turn owns and operates the Old Course Hotel, Golf Resort & Spa and develops luxury properties.

The Old Course Ltd in 2017 saw its annual pre-tax loss widen to £4.2 million from £833,736 in 2016, while turnover grew to £23.7m from £18.1m due in part to occupancy rates and the number of hotel guests increasing.

One of the advantages of not being owned by a large hotel group, says McBride, is it enables the hotel to offer guests a more personalised experience. Kohler has also provided funds to make sure that it keeps up with consumer trends and preferences.

The hotel has been expanding its offering with the likes of seaweed-based spa treatments, “pro-sleep” massages, outdoor yoga on the hotel’s fourth floor balcony, and virtual reality golf that was unveiled in September.

Such moves come amid a somewhat subdued outlook for the UK hotel sector this year, with PwC anticipating slower growth “reflecting uncertainty, softer economic and demand trends, and the impact of high levels of new hotel room additions”.

The accountancy giant expects hotels outside London to see growth in their average daily rate of 1.2 per cent, down from 1.3 per cent in 2018, with occupancy forecast to remain flat.

McBride flags the pressing need to be ahead of the game, adding that most of her job, and indeed the most challenging part, entails planning what to do next, and how it will be done.

The benefits of such a broader offering include helping boost occupancy in colder months as well as catering to the partner and/or children of golfing guests. “We’re always exploring, we’ll always continue to explore ways to be attractive to all different clients. And no business is going to want to have just one stream of revenue coming in,” she says.

McBride started her career in the hospitality trade as a “busser”, clearing and resetting restaurant tables, and she climbed the ranks at Conran Restaurants in London, at the likes of Butlers Wharf Chop House and Quaglinos, serving as opening manager for both the Great Eastern Hotel and Mezzo.

Working for the Conran group proved a formative period, giving an in-depth education in hospitality, “how much fun you could have with it, and how fast everything moved”.

Roles that followed included managing Irish restaurateur Oliver Peyton’s now-shuttered Atlantic Bar & Grill near Leicester Square, where her duties included working on the door and ensuring the right calibre of client was granted entry.

Her working environment gained a much balmier backdrop with her first international post at Sandy Lane in Barbados. It has welcomed guests including Joan Collins, Gwyneth Paltrow, the Beckhams, and Beyoncé. Tiger Woods got married there in 2004 and the resort also often hosted controversial retail tycoon Philip Green over the festive season.

McBride later worked at Rosewood Little Dix Bay in the British Virgin Islands, which is scheduled to reopen later this year after being damaged by Hurricane Irma.

That weather event also affected Necker Island, which was her next posting. She spent about two years there, holding the deputy general manager post, and now describes it as a great deal of fun and a “crazy” place to work.

“How Necker runs is completely different from any other resort that I’ve experienced – it was a phenomenal job,” she continues, saying its whole ethos was to make sure everybody had fun “all the time”, and focus on constantly coming up with new ideas for guest experiences.

But with her children’s schooling in mind a relocation was on the cards, although St Andrews had not been on her radar. She was headhunted to join her current employer, also pleased to have the chance to work with Stephen Carter. He was appointed Old Course general manager in 2016 after eight years working with De Vere Hotels, the lion’s share of which was spent at Cameron House on Loch Lomond. Previous roles include managing The Caledonian in the Scottish capital, which is now the Waldorf Astoria Edinburgh.

McBride admits that the adjustment from the Caribbean to the chilly coastal climes of Fife – and the inevitable wardrobe changes – took some time.

But she is keen to stress the advantages of her Fife base, with the hotel inking tie-ups with many local names such as beer and spirits maker Eden Mill, while the hotel’s Road Hole Bar lays claim to being able to serve a Scotch from any of the 212 active distilleries in Scotland.

Also part of the Kohler portfolio is Hamilton Grand, built in 1895 and renovated by its current owner in 2013. It comprises 26 luxury apartments overlooking the North Sea, the Royal & Ancient clubhouse, and the first tee and 18th green of the Old Course.

Built on the site of the Union Parlour, the first golfers’ club anywhere in the world, and described as having the best view in golf, it started out as the Grand Hotel more than 100 years ago, hosting guests including Edward VIII, Rudyard Kipling and Bing Crosby. It was also the first building in Scotland both to have a lift, and hot and cold running water in each bedroom.

It later served as the training headquarters of the Royal Air Force, and a University of St Andrews hall of residence, and was at one point in the sights of Donald Trump.

Herb Kohler said in the Old Course Ltd 2017 results statement, published in September last year, that Brexit uncertainty would stifle selling the apartments in 2018 and beyond, adding: “The weakening pound presents a risk of increased costs to the company, but could also stimulate overseas tourist numbers visiting the UK.”

The Office for National Statistics said in July that visitor numbers to Scotland were up by 17 per cent over the previous year to 3.2 million, with spending up by nearly a quarter.

McBride says the resort has not yet seen any impact of Brexit on its workforce, “but we are braced”. And she admits that there is “absolutely” concern, with question marks also over the future of its considerable EU imports.

The strategy is to try and manage whatever happens in the best fashion possible, but Brexit is “not something I’m looking forward to”.

For now, the focus is on service, with revenue and occupancy in robust health and their outlook positive.

You can’t take your foot off the pedal, she adds. “We need to make sure that… we’re able to give availability to the clients that want it – and that we’re using every stream of revenue well.”

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Emma Newlands"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874201.1550326222!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874201.1550326222!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "'We'll always continue to explore ways to be attractive to all different clients,' says Helen McBride. 'And no business is going to want to have just one stream of revenue.'","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "'We'll always continue to explore ways to be attractive to all different clients,' says Helen McBride. 'And no business is going to want to have just one stream of revenue.'","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874201.1550326222!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/scots-foundry-rings-changes-for-big-ben-1-4874199","id":"1.4874199","articleHeadline": "Scots foundry rings changes for Big Ben","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550325267000 ,"articleLead": "

A Scottish foundry has been given a key role in the restoration of Big Ben.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874198.1550324890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A Scottish foundry has been given a key role in the restoration of Big Ben."} ,"articleBody": "

Ballantine Castings, which is based in Bo’ness, West Lothian, is creating thousands of cast iron tiles to adorn the roof of the Elizabeth Tower, the structure that encases Britain’s most famous clock. The West Lothian factory, which almost closed four years ago is also casting hundreds of tonnes of iron tiles to replace decaying tiles on the roof of the Palace of Westminster.

The work by the 200-year old foundry involves making exact copies of the originals and is set to take several years to finish.

Speaking to the Herald, Ballantine Castings Director, Gavin Ballantine said: “Everyone knows Big Ben, and it is one of the most photographed structures in the world.

“We are working with a conservation contractor, we’re not doing any installation. All the tiles are different sizes, we have to take originals from site, bring them here, hand carve the moulds and then make the castings. We are just glad to play our part.”

Read more: ScotRail commuter train uncoupled at station because of power surge, operator reveals

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "Scotsman Reporter"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874198.1550324890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874198.1550324890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "A Scottish foundry has been given a key role in the restoration of Big Ben.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "A Scottish foundry has been given a key role in the restoration of Big Ben.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874198.1550324890!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/how-tech-giants-are-suffocating-journalism-john-mclellan-1-4874074","id":"1.4874074","articleHeadline": "How tech giants are suffocating journalism – John McLellan","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550296800000 ,"articleLead": "

The Cairncross Review highlighted how news organisations are losing advertising revenue as tech companies like Google, Apple and Facebook take a significant slice of the advertising market, writes John McLellan.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874073.1550251869!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Frances Cairncross's review of quality journalism included a misspelling of John McLellan's name"} ,"articleBody": "

Nothing to do with the Cambridge Spy Ring but everything to do with shedding light on the activities of Government, the Cairncross Review, published this week, marked a significant moment for the way in which democratic accountability of public services can be sustained.

Dame Frances Cairncross isn’t exactly a household name, although her uncle John achieved notoriety as a Soviet double agent. But as a highly respected journalist, economist and academic (she chairs the Heriot Watt University Court), she was ideally placed to take a hard, brass-tacks look at the future of quality journalism in the UK.

It won’t have been the talk of many dinner tables or bar-rooms, but for readers of this newspaper and many like it, the report should be of grave concern. In particular, her exposure of the fiendishly complicated, and in large part unintelligible, systems behind digital advertising show how the life-blood is being sucked out of news organisations around the world, not just in Britain.

Digital advertising accounts for 63 per cent of all UK advertising, according to the eMarketing website, and PricewaterhouseCooper figures showed UK digital advertising in the first half of 2018 grew by 15 per cent to £6.3bn, with £3.3bn going to search engines alone. By contrast, the total advertising spending with UK news publishers in the whole of 2018, according to then Advertising Association, was expected to be around £1.8bn, a drop of five per cent.

Starting with the tech giants like Google, Apple and Facebook, the Cairncross Review highlights the growing number of participants in the supply chain, each adding a complication and each taking a slice of the advertising cake, while the organisations which rely on those resources to fund the supply of information are slowly asphyxiated. Ironically, other tech giants like Amazon are also waking up to this murky bonanza and are looking at ways of cutting out as many middle-men as possible to, literally, deliver the goods more effectively.

Finding solutions is another thing and, to some extent, that was beyond both her remit and resources so the Department of Culture Media and Sport, which commissioned the report, has quickly followed her recommendations for further investigations. Firstly the Competitions & Markets Authority is to look at the way digital advertising markets operate and secondly Ofcom is to examine the extent to which the BBC’s free online services impact on commercial news publishers. Both are long overdue but more immediately the recommendation that online subscriptions be VAT exempt, as are hard-copy newspaper and magazine sales, is now being put to the Treasury.

If there is a criticism of the report, it is in its somewhat narrow definition of what represents quality journalism, and also the notion that public interest investigative journalism was ever a commodity which could stand on its own two feet. In separating sport and lifestyle, it glosses over the fact that successful broadsheet newspapers traded as much on what might be seen as sideshows as their political coverage. It was no coincidence that when the Daily Telegraph was in its pomp and outselling the Mail and Express in places like the West Country, it ran in-depth coverage of grass-roots club rugby and its Page Three court reporting was every bit as salacious as the News of the World.

Of course, as the former editor of this newspaper and the current director of the Scottish Newspaper Society, I can hardly be described as an impartial observer and I met with Dame Frances to discuss the Scottish industry and helped set up consultations in Scotland.

So I could afford a wry smile when, in a report which made an impassioned case for the importance of quality journalism, with which I would hardly disagree, I found my name misspelled. We all make mistakes.

We all make mistakes, Mr McVey

Corrections and clarifications are part and parcel of news publishing now, but some readers of the Edinburgh Evening News may have missed an important one.

Nothing that fine paper had done wrong, but the clarification involved an article about Edinburgh’s £207m tram completion project and Lord Hardie’s ongoing inquiry into the disastrous project to build the current line from the airport.

The piece in Monday’s paper stated: “The council has engaged with the tram inquiry and the expert witnesses to make sure we cover any eventuality”, which prompted a response the next day on the Tram Inquiry website.

“In a recent news article considering the business case for the Newhaven tram extension,” it said, “it was stated the Tram Inquiry has engaged with the Edinburgh City Council to make sure it ‘can cover every eventuality’. For the avoidance of doubt, the Edinburgh Tram Inquiry has had no discussions with Edinburgh City Council about the tram extension, or any eventuality in relation to it.”

Oops. On Wednesday the clarification was duly re-published in the paper, so who could have got it so wrong? Step forward City Council leader Adam McVey whose original article it was, and who then had to tweet on Thursday afternoon that the council had “engaged with the tram inquiry by providing evidence and has monitored proceedings to capture evidence”.

A clumsy phrase was to blame apparently, certainly not any willful intention to mislead the public into thinking the Council had actually spoken to the expert witnesses. We all make mistakes.

Peter Wood, a much-esteemed man

Three years ago, an important study was undertaken to quantify the full economic impact of the Scottish newspaper industry to underpin the case, particularly to government, that the news industry was about a lot more than just headlines. It was able to show the sector was worth over £1bn a year to the Scottish economy and supported over 4,000 full time jobs.

The work was carried out by the widely respected economist Peter Wood, a man with the ability to cut through to the nub of both political and economic arguments and who had been an adviser to the UK Government and local authorities as well as private business.

The esteem in which he was held was obvious from the number of people who packed Edinburgh’s Reid Memorial Church on Tuesday morning for his funeral after his sudden death a couple of weeks ago aged just 66, leaving wife Lindsay and daughters Rebecca and Paula.

He was also a friend. I don’t think either of us were particularly religious, but God bless you, Peter.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874073.1550251869!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874073.1550251869!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Frances Cairncross's review of quality journalism included a misspelling of John McLellan's name","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Frances Cairncross's review of quality journalism included a misspelling of John McLellan's name","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874073.1550251869!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/future-scotland/tech/scientists-at-roslin-institute-alter-dna-to-produce-disease-resistant-pigs-1-4874093","id":"1.4874093","articleHeadline": "Scientists at Roslin Institute alter DNA to produce ‘disease resistant’ pigs","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550254111000 ,"articleLead": "

SCOTS are to be asked if they fancy tucking into a bacon butty from a genetically modified pig as part of a new survey testing their perception of edited meat.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874092.1550254107!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Scientists at Roslin Institute have used technology to produce pigs that are resistant to disease"} ,"articleBody": "

Boffins at University of Edinburgh’s Roslin Institute – where scientists famously created Dolly the Sheep – have used the technology to produce pigs that are resistant to disease.

Now they want to test attitudes towards gene editing in livestock and find out whether people would eat meat from an animal that has had its DNA altered.

Their responses will be used to “inform research”, the Institute says.

It is hoped the technological advance could be used to help better shield livestock in developing nations from disease and changed to their natural environment.

Gene editing involves altering some of the individual “letters” that make up an animal’s genetic code.

The technology can be used to introduce characteristics into animals, or indeed plants, such as resistance to a specific disease or improved adaptation to different environments.

However, professor Bruce Whitelaw, of the Institute, said the practice still attracted moral objections.

He said: “It is no longer a question of whether we can use gene editing technology to improve livestock health, but rather whether we should use it.”

“We need to better understand public opinion to inform how these technologies are used and also how they should be regulated.”

Researchers at the Institute 
have used gene editing to produce pigs that are resistant to a disease called porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, 
which causes pig producers significant losses worldwide.

Teams at Roslin are working with experts at the Centre for Tropical Livestock Genetics and Health in Edinburgh and in Africa to explore how the technology could be used to benefit production animals in tropical climates.

The goal is to improve the health and welfare of farmed animals around the world, and to improve the security of food supplies in low and middle-income countries.

Professor Appolinaire Djikeng, Director of the Centre for Tropical Livestock Genetics and Health, said: “Livestock farming is a reliable source of food for people living in extreme poverty and creates economic opportunities for farmers in low and middle-income countries.

“With equitable partnerships and wider stakeholder engagement, gene editing could provide opportunities to produce healthier and more resilient animals for vulnerable farmers, and help address some of the challenges associated with rearing animals in tropical climates.”

Scientists insist that the changes introduced in gene editing are the same as those that could occur spontaneously in nature.

Most natural changes either have no impact or are harmful to the animal. With gene editing, precise changes that are likely to be beneficial can be introduced.

The approach does not involve transferring genes from one species to another and is different from transgenic techniques, which often do.

newsen@edinburghnews.com

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "TIM BUGLER"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874092.1550254107!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874092.1550254107!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Scientists at Roslin Institute have used technology to produce pigs that are resistant to disease","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Scientists at Roslin Institute have used technology to produce pigs that are resistant to disease","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874092.1550254107!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/financial/lloyds-recruits-morgan-stanley-banker-as-cfo-1-4874081","id":"1.4874081","articleHeadline": "Lloyds recruits Morgan Stanley banker as CFO","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550252830000 ,"articleLead": "

Bank of Scotland owner Lloyds Banking Group has tapped Morgan Stanley investment banker William Chalmers to be its next finance boss.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874080.1550252827!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Chalmers will join Lloyds in June from Morgan Stanley. Picture: Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

Chalmers is currently co-head of Morgan Stanley’s global financial institutions group, having joined the US bank in 2000. He previously spent six years at JP Morgan, where he became managing director in 2003.

Chalmers will join Lloyds as chief financial officer in June following the retirement of incumbent George Culmer.

The high-street lender, which reports its 2018 results on Wednesday, will pay Chalmers about £4.4 million in deferred cash to replace awards he will lose when he leaves Morgan Stanley and he will be eligible for awards under the Lloyds share scheme. He will also pocket a basic salary of just under £800,000 and receive a fixed share award of £504,000, delivered over five years.

Lloyds chief executive Antonio Horta-Osorio said Chalmers will enhance the executive team. We will be sad to see George go, but are pleased to have had him in the team for the past seven years and to be able to have George and William working together to ensure a smooth transition.”

Lord Blackwell, Lloyds chairman, said: “We are pleased to have been able to attract a candidate of William’s calibre to the board. He brings a wealth of experience that will be of significant benefit to the group.”

Chalmers described Lloyds as “tremendous company that is going through an impressive transformation”, adding: “I look forward to getting started and making a contribution”.

" ,"byline": {"email": "emma.newlands@jpimedia.co.uk" ,"author": "EMMA NEWLANDS"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874080.1550252827!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874080.1550252827!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Chalmers will join Lloyds in June from Morgan Stanley. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Chalmers will join Lloyds in June from Morgan Stanley. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874080.1550252827!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/12-of-the-most-enchanting-places-to-get-married-in-scotland-in-2019-1-4874009","id":"1.4874009","articleHeadline": "12 of the most enchanting places to get married in Scotland in 2019","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550246117730 ,"articleLead": "

Planning on tying the knot soon?

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873994.1550246495!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "You'd be hard pushed to find more enchanting spots to get married than at these Scottish locations"} ,"articleBody": "

If you are a bride or groom to be, you'd be hard pushed to find more enchanting spots to get married than at these Scottish locations. From grand castles to stunning outdoor spaces, there's something to cater for every taste.

" ,"byline": {"email": "claire.schofield@jpress.co.uk" ,"author": "Claire Schofield"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873994.1550246495!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873994.1550246495!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "You'd be hard pushed to find more enchanting spots to get married than at these Scottish locations","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "You'd be hard pushed to find more enchanting spots to get married than at these Scottish locations","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873994.1550246495!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873996.1550246497!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873996.1550246497!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Sitting surrounded by acres of wooded parkland, this stunning 14th century castle provides a secluded spot for your special day, complete with a unique adjoining chapel with its own private courtyard entrance.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Sitting surrounded by acres of wooded parkland, this stunning 14th century castle provides a secluded spot for your special day, complete with a unique adjoining chapel with its own private courtyard entrance.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873996.1550246497!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873997.1550246498!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873997.1550246498!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Boasting two beautiful wedding venues, at Harvest Moon you can opt to tie the knot on the beach, or in the enchanting treehouse site which offers views of Bass Rock, providing a memorable backdrop for the celebration.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Boasting two beautiful wedding venues, at Harvest Moon you can opt to tie the knot on the beach, or in the enchanting treehouse site which offers views of Bass Rock, providing a memorable backdrop for the celebration.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873997.1550246498!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873999.1550246499!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873999.1550246499!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Nestled in the heart of the Scottish borders, this 500 year old listed tower has plenty of historic charm. And with an outdoor terrace, walled garden and orchard, it makes a great spot for a summer wedding.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Nestled in the heart of the Scottish borders, this 500 year old listed tower has plenty of historic charm. And with an outdoor terrace, walled garden and orchard, it makes a great spot for a summer wedding.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873999.1550246499!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874000.1550246500!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874000.1550246500!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Catering for both large and more intimate wedding ceremonies, this wedding venue is full of rustic romance, with decking areas, a cosy lodge and picturesque grounds all at your disposal.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Catering for both large and more intimate wedding ceremonies, this wedding venue is full of rustic romance, with decking areas, a cosy lodge and picturesque grounds all at your disposal.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874000.1550246500!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874001.1550246501!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874001.1550246501!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Considered one of Edinburgh's finest Georgian buildings, The Signet Library offers a more unusual space to say your vows, and boasts a gorgeous interior with plenty of history and elegance.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Considered one of Edinburgh's finest Georgian buildings, The Signet Library offers a more unusual space to say your vows, and boasts a gorgeous interior with plenty of history and elegance.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874001.1550246501!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874002.1550246502!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874002.1550246502!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Occupying a wonderfully scenic spot in the Scottish Highlands, weddings here can take place inside the impressive Banqueting Hall, accommodating up to 70 guests, or in the courtyard outside looking out on the mountains of Skye.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Occupying a wonderfully scenic spot in the Scottish Highlands, weddings here can take place inside the impressive Banqueting Hall, accommodating up to 70 guests, or in the courtyard outside looking out on the mountains of Skye.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874002.1550246502!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874003.1550246503!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874003.1550246503!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Surrounded by miles of beaches and offering four star luxury accommodation in a cosy cottages at its base, this lighthouse is ideal if you're looking for a unique setting for your nuptials.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Surrounded by miles of beaches and offering four star luxury accommodation in a cosy cottages at its base, this lighthouse is ideal if you're looking for a unique setting for your nuptials.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874003.1550246503!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874004.1550246504!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874004.1550246504!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "If you're keen to host your nuptial at a venue with glorious views, few could beat the scenery surrounding this 14th century castle, where you can even take your views overlooking the loch.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "If you're keen to host your nuptial at a venue with glorious views, few could beat the scenery surrounding this 14th century castle, where you can even take your views overlooking the loch.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874004.1550246504!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874005.1550246505!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874005.1550246505!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Dubbed as Edinburgh's 'Sistine Chapel', few venues are as impressive as Mansfield Traquair. The high vaulted ceilings, historic architecture and state-of-the-art lighting make for the perfect fairytale location.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Dubbed as Edinburgh's 'Sistine Chapel', few venues are as impressive as Mansfield Traquair. The high vaulted ceilings, historic architecture and state-of-the-art lighting make for the perfect fairytale location.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874005.1550246505!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874006.1550246506!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874006.1550246506!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "This stunning Victorian Ballroom is wonderfully atmospheric, featuring original oak floors and high vaulted ceilings adorned with more than 700 antlers, and room for up tp 160 guests - perfect for a big celebration.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "This stunning Victorian Ballroom is wonderfully atmospheric, featuring original oak floors and high vaulted ceilings adorned with more than 700 antlers, and room for up tp 160 guests - perfect for a big celebration.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874006.1550246506!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874007.1550246507!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874007.1550246507!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Ideally suited for anyone who has always dreamed of tying the knot outdoors, Edinburgh's Secret Herb Garden provides a unique setting surrounding by luscious greenery, making for a more unusual, rustic wedding.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Ideally suited for anyone who has always dreamed of tying the knot outdoors, Edinburgh's Secret Herb Garden provides a unique setting surrounding by luscious greenery, making for a more unusual, rustic wedding.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874007.1550246507!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} , {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4874008.1550246508!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4874008.1550246508!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "This romantic destination sits surrounded by mature gardens set deep in the East Lothian countryside, and can accommodate from 50 up to 130 guests inside the castle, catering for both intimate and more lavish affairs.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "This romantic destination sits surrounded by mature gardens set deep in the East Lothian countryside, and can accommodate from 50 up to 130 guests inside the castle, catering for both intimate and more lavish affairs.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4874008.1550246508!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/jenny-ross-going-digital-not-an-option-for-everyone-1-4873877","id":"1.4873877","articleHeadline": "Jenny Ross: ‘Going digital’ not an option for everyone","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550236248000 ,"articleLead": "

On which coin would you find the Prince of Wales’ feathers? That was one of the questions at a pub quiz I went to last week. I’m pleased to say that our team knew it was a 2p, but the follow-up challenge proved more problematic. A spot prize was on offer for the team who could produce the biggest collection of 2p coins, causing a look of defeat and mild confusion to flicker over my teammates’ faces. Between six of us, we could only muster three, while the spot prize winners scraped together eight.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873876.1550236244!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The chaos that ensued from TSB's introduction of a new IT system last April illustrates that the move towards a cashless society does not come without risks. Picture: John Devlin"} ,"articleBody": "

The scarcity of coins in the room came as no surprise to anyone. I was more surprised to find that I did in fact have a small handful lurking at the bottom of my bag. After all, cash is no longer the default way to pay across the UK. In 2017, debit card payments overtook cash as the most popular form of payment for the first time. A decade ago, six out of every ten transactions were made with cash, compared to three in ten today.

There’s no denying cash is in decline, but it can be easy to overstate the shift towards digital payments.

For one thing, this is not happening at the same pace across the country. The 2p challenge took place in central London – if it was posed at the pub in my parents’ village in Devon, for example, I’m sure the spot prize would have been more hotly contested. I can’t imagine it being met with a chorus of “but I never have any cash on me”, as happened at the quiz I went to.

When you look at the data on cashpoint withdrawals, it becomes clear that some parts of the country are making the move away from cash more quickly than others. Withdrawals in London and the South East fell by 8.5 per cent and 7.7 per cent respectively in 2017-18, but the rate of change elsewhere has been more gradual.

In the North West, Scotland and Wales, withdrawals saw a drop of 3.3 per cent, while in Northern Ireland they fell by just 2.1 per cent. As you’d expect, London also has the highest proportion of people using contactless payments (the lowest is in the North West).

I rarely withdraw cash now, but can’t imagine going without it altogether. And I’m not alone. In a 2018 Which? survey, more than three in five (61 per cent) people said they felt negatively about the idea of notes and coins ceasing to exist all together, with three-quarters (73 per cent) saying they still use cash frequently to pay for goods and services.

Some 2.2 million people are entirely reliant on cash in their daily lives. Among them is Barbara Pointon, a retired lecturer. When I visited Barbara at her home in the Cambridgeshire village of Thriplow to discuss the issue of ATM closures, she explained that she “couldn’t live without cash”, and uses it to pay several people who help her around the home. She’s worried about the long journey she’ll have to make to access cash if her local ATM closes, and feels strongly that she should have the freedom to use the payment method that she prefers.

ATMs are closing at unprecedented rates. Between June and December 2018, 1,524 free-to-use machines disappeared – that’s 254 a month.

This is compounded by the acceleration of bank branch closures. The UK has lost two- thirds of its branch network in the last 30 years, with just over 3,300 branches having closed since 2015 (399 of these in Scotland).

Which? is concerned that this rapidly changing landscape will leave people struggling to access the cash they rely on – and not just older people like Barbara. In rural communities, poor broadband or mobile connectivity can pose a challenge for alternative payment methods, making cash more important.

We’ve also heard from small business owners, people on low incomes and those with disabilities who worry about being left behind. Disabled blogger Gem Turner, from West Yorkshire, told us that she would lose her independence without access to cash, and stressed the importance of realising that for many people there are still barriers to “going digital”.

Digital payments have many advantages – being able to tap and pay with your card, phone – even your watch – is amazingly convenient. But these systems are far from infallible. Recent analysis has found that leading banks are suffering at least one major security or IT glitch per week. Last year the Visa payments outage and prolonged issues at TSB caused chaos for millions of customers, providing a powerful reminder of one of the risks posed by the move towards a cashless society. Cash may be the horse and cart next to the sports car of digital payments, but it’s a valuable fallback when technology fails.

At Which? we believe that people should be able to pay in the way that suits their needs. That’s why we’ve launched a campaign called ‘Freedom to pay. Our way’, which is urging the government to appoint a regulator who will have a duty to protect access to cash for as long as people need it and to ensure that no one is shut out by the march towards digital.

Jenny Ross is Which? money editor

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873876.1550236244!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873876.1550236244!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The chaos that ensued from TSB's introduction of a new IT system last April illustrates that the move towards a cashless society does not come without risks. Picture: John Devlin","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The chaos that ensued from TSB's introduction of a new IT system last April illustrates that the move towards a cashless society does not come without risks. Picture: John Devlin","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873876.1550236244!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/media-leisure/patisserie-valerie-subsidiary-sold-in-2-5m-deal-1-4873841","id":"1.4873841","articleHeadline": "Patisserie Valerie subsidiary sold in £2.5m deal","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550232442000 ,"articleLead": "

Administrators to stricken cake chain Patisserie Valerie have sold off Baker & Spice, one of the firm’s sister brands, to the Department of Coffee & Social Affairs for £2.5 million.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873840.1550232438!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The sale of Baker & Spice follows deals for Patisserie Valerie and Philpotts yesterday. Picture: Lauren Hurley/PA Wire"} ,"articleBody": "

Baker & Spice has five stores in Belgravia, Chelsea, Maida Vale, Oxford and within Selfridges.

The deal was agreed the day after KPMG announced that 96 stores contained within the main Patisserie Valerie business had been sold in management buy-out backed by Irish private equity firm Causeway Capital Partners and, in a separate transaction, food wholesaler AF Blakemore & Son had picked up all 21 stores of the Philpotts subsidiary.

The two brands fetched a combined £13m and the deals safeguarded nearly 2,000 jobs.

Patisserie Valerie, which was chaired by businessman Luke Johnson, was put up for sale last month after collapsing following the discovery of fraudulent activity in its accounts.

KPMG has already closed 70 stores, resulting in 920 redundancies. Sports Direct tycoon Mike Ashley subsequently submitted a bid for the chain, but later withdrew it, complaining that he had been locked out of the process by KPMG

" ,"byline": {"email": "businessdesk@scotsman.co.uk" ,"author": "RAVENDER SEMBHY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873840.1550232438!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873840.1550232438!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The sale of Baker & Spice follows deals for Patisserie Valerie and Philpotts yesterday. Picture: Lauren Hurley/PA Wire","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The sale of Baker & Spice follows deals for Patisserie Valerie and Philpotts yesterday. Picture: Lauren Hurley/PA Wire","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873840.1550232438!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/financial/royal-bank-of-scotland-profits-rise-as-lender-issues-special-dividend-1-4873757","id":"1.4873757","articleHeadline": "Royal Bank of Scotland profits rise as lender issues special dividend","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550228837000 ,"articleLead": "

Royal Bank of Scotland has reported its second successive year in the black and announced a £1.6 billion final dividend, resulting in a near £1bn windfall for the taxpayer.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873756.1550228833!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "RBS has issued its second dividend since being bailed out by the government a decade ago. Picture: John Devlin."} ,"articleBody": "

The lender, still 62.4 per cent owned by the UK government, saw bottom line profits more than double from £752 million last year to £1.62bn, representing a 116 per cent increase. Full year pre-tax operating profit rose 50 per cent to £3.4bn.

It marks the bank’s second consecutive year in the black following a decade-long run of stinging losses, during a period marred by crisis-era legacy and conduct charges.

The government will also pocket £977m as RBS coughed up its second dividend since its £45bn bailout a decade earlier. The cash will be given to UK Government Investments, which manages the taxpayer’s stake in the lender.

The bank paid out a 3.5p final dividend and a 7.5p special dividend, meaning the total returned to shareholders in the year amounts to £1.6bn.

Chief executive Ross McEwan said: “This is a good performance in the face of economic and political uncertainty, with bottom line profits more than double what we achieved the previous year.

“We are also announcing an intention to pay back more capital to shareholders and almost £1bn is set to be returned to UK taxpayers for 2018. With strong capital and liquidity levels, we are well positioned to support the UK economy.”

RBS resumed paying dividends in August when it reached a $4.9bn (£3.7bn) settlement with US authorities over claims that it mis-sold mortgages in the run-up to the financial crisis. Today’s figures take into account conduct and litigation costs of £1.28bn.

McEwan also warned that “political uncertainty around Brexit has gone on far too long”, adding that the bank’s corporate clients are pausing investment and this will have an impact on income over the next two years.

His comments chime with official data showing that Brexit is damaging the economy. “The economy is cooling off and we are starting to feel it,” the chief executive added.

In October, RBS set aside £100m to reflect the “more uncertain economic outlook” in Britain ahead of the EU departure date of 29 March 29. It has also set up operations in Amsterdam and Frankfurt to serve EU clients.

While overseeing the bank’s turnaround, McEwan has embarked on a swingeing bank closure programme but confirmed that no further branch closures are planned in 2019 or 2020.

The New Zealander does not expect further litigation linked to GRG, the lender’s controversial restructuring unit which was accused of mistreating small businesses.

RBS’ annual report, published alongside the results, showed that McEwan’s total pay package rose from £3.5m to £3.6m in 2018. The bank also confirmed that it will dish out £335m in bonuses to staff.

Accounts show that RBS stripped out £278m in costs last year, and aims to slash a further £300m this year. The stellar figures will prompt the government to consider when to recommence the next round of share sales.

Last week the lender gained shareholder approval that allows it to buy back up to £1.5bn worth of shares from the Treasury. The move, which aims to speed up its privatisation and deploy excess capital, permits RBS to purchase up to 4.99 per cent of the government’s stake in any one year.

RBS has been majority taxpayer owned since 2008, when it received a £45bn bailout at the height of the financial crisis. The Treasury plans to sell its stake by 2024 but is expected to lose billions in the process.

The bank’s shares have rallied since December, but the company’s stock is trading at around 244p, a far cry from when it was bailed out at 502p per share.

" ,"byline": {"email": "businessdesk@scotsman.com" ,"author": "RAVENDER SEMBHY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873756.1550228833!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873756.1550228833!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "RBS has issued its second dividend since being bailed out by the government a decade ago. Picture: John Devlin.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "RBS has issued its second dividend since being bailed out by the government a decade ago. Picture: John Devlin.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873756.1550228833!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/media-leisure/performing-arts-academy-predicts-threefold-revenue-rise-1-4873326","id":"1.4873326","articleHeadline": "Performing arts academy predicts threefold revenue rise","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550213684000 ,"articleLead": "

An Edinburgh-based performing arts school is eying a threefold revenue rise and a major expansion after requests for its services have soared.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873325.1550154978!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The MGA Academy of Performing Arts founders Andrew Gowland (left) and Murray Grant. Picture: Mike Wilkinson."} ,"articleBody": "

Applications doubled at The MGA Academy of Performing Arts last year, reaching 1,800 for 90 places, after it became the first institution in Scotland to receive a full accreditation from the Council for Dance, Drama and Musical Theatre.

The academy, which employs 12 full-time staff and 45 contractors, expects revenues to nearly treble by 2023, from £1.3 million to £3.6m.

It is also actively looking to expand its footprint, aiming to boost its current 15,000 square foot of studio and office space to 35,000sq ft.

Co-founder Drew Gowland said the academy places a particular focus on the practical aspects of working as a performer, including regularly bringing in agents, union representatives, accountants and lawyers to share their insights.

He said: “We make sure it is part of our on-going development. You can be the best performer in the world, but if you do not know how to write to an agent and sell yourself, then you will never get a job, and no one will ever see that talent.”

Gowland, originally from Leeds, and his partner Murray Grant, from Edinburgh, secured an £85,000 loan in 2010 to establish their operation in a former Wheatsheaf pub in Balgreen, later adding two further venues as the academy grew.

Recent graduates include West End performers Rhiannon Chesterman and Rebecca Stenhouse, as well as Disney film star Thomas Doherty, who will appear in the upcoming HBO/Sky mini series Catherine The Great, alongside Helen Mirren.

" ,"byline": {"email": "hannah.burley@jpimedia.co.uk" ,"author": "HANNAH BURLEY"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873325.1550154978!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873325.1550154978!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The MGA Academy of Performing Arts founders Andrew Gowland (left) and Murray Grant. Picture: Mike Wilkinson.","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The MGA Academy of Performing Arts founders Andrew Gowland (left) and Murray Grant. Picture: Mike Wilkinson.","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873325.1550154978!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/brexit-real-risks-of-uk-becoming-a-less-friendly-place-leader-comment-1-4873510","id":"1.4873510","articleHeadline": "Brexit: Real risks of UK becoming a ‘less friendly place’ – leader comment","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550210400000 ,"articleLead": "

As MPs indulged in political theatre, a leading light of the arts issued a warning of real substance about Britain’s place in the world.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873509.1550171020!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Members of the Catalonian string orchestra Orquestra de Cambra d'Emporda, who combine classical music with pop songs and mime, pose in Edinburgh (Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)"} ,"articleBody": "

It took a Supreme Court ruling for MPs to win the right to hold a “meaningful vote” about Brexit. Yesterday saw a Commons defeat for a Government motion supporting Theresa May’s Brexit strategy in a meaningless one. It mattered so little that the Prime Minister didn’t even bother to show up.

Politics as theatre is entertaining – for some – but unlike the best dramas this one lacked impact in the real world.

Ironically, several hours before the vote, a leading light in the world of the arts was warning of the real dangers of cutting ourselves off from the rest of the world.

Julia Amour, director of Festivals Edinburgh, said there was a risk that “the UK is being seen as a less friendly place and one that wants to close its borders”. The “rise of populist politics” was creating problems for festivals that had always had an international theme, she added.

READ MORE: Brexit: Corbyn and May’s lack of plain-speaking is a serious problem – Paris Gourtsoyannis

Edinburgh MP Deidre Brock also recently hit out at the UK Government’s infamously “hostile” approach to immigration because it has even been affecting performers invited to attend the city’s festivals.

Brexit-supporting politicians often say the UK is leaving the EU, not Europe, and that we will all still remain friends. But, much like any divorce, there have been outbreaks of bad blood between both parties.

The Brexiteers have also stressed that we will still be able to make new friends around the world, even if EU-UK relations sour. Part of the argument for “taking back control” has always been the ability for Britain to strike its own trade deals with other countries.

However, progress on this front to date has been rather sluggish. Out of 40 trade deals the EU, and therefore the UK, currently has with more than 70 countries – which would be lost overnight in the event of a no-deal Brexit – Britain has currently agreed four new deals. So companies that trade with Eastern and Southern Africa, Chile, Switzerland and the Faroe Islands can rest easy.

The UK Government says that “in the event of a ‘no deal’”, it would seek to strike deals with other countries as soon as possible. “These new agreements will replicate existing EU agreements,” it adds somewhat presumptuously. In other words, the best we can hope for is what we already have.

We seem to be finding out in this divorce that ‘our friends’ were really the EU’s. And given our descent into a “less friendly place”, no wonder.

READ MORE: Nicola Sturgeon: UK ‘not remotely prepared’ for Brexit

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873509.1550171020!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873509.1550171020!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Members of the Catalonian string orchestra Orquestra de Cambra d'Emporda, who combine classical music with pop songs and mime, pose in Edinburgh (Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Members of the Catalonian string orchestra Orquestra de Cambra d'Emporda, who combine classical music with pop songs and mime, pose in Edinburgh (Picture: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873509.1550171020!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/john-blackwood-don-t-slam-the-door-on-landlords-they-provide-a-vital-service-1-4873082","id":"1.4873082","articleHeadline": "John Blackwood: Don’t slam the door on landlords – they provide a vital service","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550210051000 ,"articleLead": "

There has been a clear ­policy direction over the past ­decade or more by governments of all colours at both Westminster and Holyrood seeking to reduce the size of the private rented sector in the UK. This began from the ­simple premise that landlords buying up properties for rent were preventing young people getting on the much vaunted “housing ladder”.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873081.1550141733!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "John Blackwood, Chief Executive, Scottish Association of Landlords (SAL)"} ,"articleBody": "

Since then there has been a succession of changes in regulations and tax which aimed to meet this implicit goal. Some of these changes have been welcome. Responsible landlords want to see increased standards and professionalisation of the sector, to rebuild the reputation of a sector which has been historically poor.

However, many of the changes to the tax regime for landlords, such as ending the ‘wear and tear’ allowance, increasing tax on mortgage interest and the blanket increase on tax for additional homes no matter the ­reason for purchase, seem ­punitive and excessive especially when ­considered as a package.

What has to be admitted, however, is that these measures have been ­successful. The size and future effectiveness of the private rented sector is, indeed, under threat with more and more of our members telling us they are considering leaving the sector.

These are not massive organisations who might own hundreds of properties, these are individuals with one or two high-quality properties which they manage in the same way another individual might operate any small business.

I know it is hard to make anyone feel sorry for landlords – but just for a moment consider, what if all of these changes are based on a false premise?

What if reducing the number of landlords has not freed up houses for ­purchase by first time ­buyers? Should landlords be taxed differently from other small businesses, on income rather than profit? What if all that has been achieved is to allow faceless house builders to build ­hundreds upon hundreds of ‘build-to-rent’ accommodation in the wrong ­locations and to ­punish a small business sector providing much needed flexible accommodation in cities?

That is certainly a contention that the Scottish Association of Landlords would argue. Whilst tax changes drive out landlords who own ­properties in major cities where ­flexible accommodation is essential for further and higher education and economic growth, new build-to-rent properties are being constructed in suburbs of cities where traditionally more affordable homes would be available for purchase.

We know there is a housing crisis in Scotland, as well as public concern about the number of homes available for private purchase. However, in many parts of Scotland, the only people buying properties and ­modernising them are private ­landlords who then make them ­available for rent which is often the most desired type of housing in these ­areas.

Even with the massive investment in house building and moves to reduce planning constraints to free up more land for building, the latest figures show that Scotland is around 7,000 new houses a year short of what is needed. Driving out landlords with one or two properties cannot come close to bridging that gap. So, what strategic goal does increased tax on landlords serve?

The most recent move by the ­Scottish Government to increase the Additional Dwelling Supplement (ADS) by 4 per cent when a house is purchased is just the latest in a move that seems to be tactical rather than strategic, although I am sure voters will welcome another “hammering” of landlords and those with second homes.

We have already seen the tax take from ADS more than double over the course of 2018 so this latest increase risks landlords being seen as a cash cow for government, which they most certainly are not. Our members operate their businesses on very tight margins so any increase in cost is ­likely to lead to a decrease in investment.

We want to see the right balance of housing across Scotland, be that new build, social housing or the private sector to effectively tackle the ­housing crisis. The risk is that by taking politically expedient and easy action, our members will be driven out of the market and, far from solving the housing crisis, we will see less of the right types of homes in the right locations across Scotland.

John Blackwood, chief executive, Scottish Association of Landlords (SAL).

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": "John Blackwood"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873081.1550141733!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873081.1550141733!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "John Blackwood, Chief Executive, Scottish Association of Landlords (SAL)","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "John Blackwood, Chief Executive, Scottish Association of Landlords (SAL)","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873081.1550141733!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/comment-tech-start-ups-are-turning-the-tide-in-aberdeen-1-4873076","id":"1.4873076","articleHeadline": "Comment: Tech start-ups are turning the tide in Aberdeen","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550204515000 ,"articleLead": "

For the new generation of oil and gas tech start-ups, Aberdeen boasts a progressive, supportive ecosystem which can set them off on the journey from ground breaking whiteboard concept to international success.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873075.1550140914!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Incredible work is taking place in Aberdeen to nurture a new wave of tech start-ups, says Ewan. Picture: Contributed"} ,"articleBody": "

A 50-year oil and gas heritage with a solid foundation of innovation and flexibility, strong industry exposure to the major operators and throughout the supply chain, proven infrastructure, government backing and a wealth of agencies, including Scottish Enterprise, place Aberdeen as a strategically important hub from which tech start-ups are being given every opportunity to make their mark.

The fall-out from the oil and gas industry downturn has been well documented. Those of us closely involved need little reminder of the thousands of jobs lost and the established businesses which failed to survive, or at best were acquired in the merger and acquisition merry-go-round which is part of any economic slump.

I am glad to say the industry is in recovery mode, but we all accept there will be no return to the days of $140 a barrel. As the North Sea operators and service companies staff-up for an expected increase in offshore activity, I am encouraged by the incredible amount of work that is taking place in Aberdeen in nurturing this new wave of start-ups with the potential to ensure the UK benefits from a sustainable hydrocarbon industry for years to come.

I am fortunate to be involved as an advisor to some of these new companies through Pinsent Masons’ association as legal mentor to the TechX accelerator and incubator, which is run under the auspices of the city’s Oil & Gas Technology Centre (OGTC).

The first graduates of the TechX programme are now putting in to practice the experience gained from top-level business mentoring and the benefits of accessing rapid prototyping, test facilities, large-sale field trials and industry events. The second cohort starts in earnest in May and each will have access to up to £100,000 funding, with no equity stake or payback and the retention of all intellectual property (IP).

Working alongside OGTC, other equally exciting initiatives by bodies such as Opportunity North East (ONE) and its Digital & Entrepreneurship programme, Scottish Enterprise and Elevator, have added a much-needed vibrancy to the Aberdeen economy and there is now an ecosystem developing locally which is bound to produce lots of opportunities for this new generation of tech companies.

Thousands of skilled hands – and minds – were sadly lost to the oil and gas sector as a result of the downturn. Fortunately, initiatives like Grey Matters, from Elevator and Scottish Enterprise, have brought together senior industry professionals who are experienced in leadership, collaboration, problem-solving and building teams. These skills are being harnessed to create high-growth scaleable energy sector firms.

The single biggest issue that crops up time and again for start-ups is that they fail to properly secure their IP rights, which can lead to insurmountable challenges further down the line. In some circumstances, this can mean the difference between a firm going under or pushing ahead to achieve its full potential.

Issues can arise when a business commissions a third-party supplier to develop a piece of software or equipment on which the company’s future success will be founded. Such is the drive and excitement of building a young business, that the owners/founders sometimes fail to secure ownership of the IP of the software or equipment. It is only later, when the third party supplier starts to assert their IP rights that things start to unravel.

By seeking the appropriate legal advice at the outset, such a scenario can be avoided but it is not an overstatement to say that failure to do this can undermine the entire viability of an enterprise and likely scare off any potential investors, no mater how brilliant the concept or technology being pioneered.

- Martin Ewan, partner and oil and gas technology law specialist at Pinsent Masons

" ,"byline": {"email": "businessdesk@scotsman.com" ,"author": "MARTIN EWAN"} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873075.1550140914!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873075.1550140914!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "Incredible work is taking place in Aberdeen to nurture a new wave of tech start-ups, says Ewan. Picture: Contributed","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "Incredible work is taking place in Aberdeen to nurture a new wave of tech start-ups, says Ewan. Picture: Contributed","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873075.1550140914!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} , {"article": {"url":"https://www.scotsman.com/business/companies/airbus-announces-end-of-superjumbo-after-poor-sales-1-4873541","id":"1.4873541","articleHeadline": "Airbus announces end of superjumbo after poor sales","commentCount":0,"publishedDate":1550173588000 ,"articleLead": "

Unions have expressed “bitter disappointment” at news that Airbus is to cease production of its superjumbo A380 aircraft.

","articleThumbnail": {"thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873540.1550173584!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The firm said it had made the 'painful' decision after struggling to sell the world's largest passenger jet"} ,"articleBody": "

Unite, which represents workers at Airbus sites in Broughton, North Wales, and Filton, near Bristol, and those in supply chain companies such as GKN, said it would be seeking assurances on jobs and future work.

A few hundred staff in the UK work on the aircraft, mainly at Broughton, but it is hoped they can be redeployed.

The firm said it had made the “painful” decision after struggling to sell the world’s largest passenger jet and after Emirates chose to slash its A380 order book by around a quarter.

Due to the reduction and a lack of orders from other airlines, Airbus said it would end deliveries of the record-breaking plane in 2021, 14 years after it first entered commercial service.

Emirates is yet to take delivery of 14 of the double-decker aircraft, which has wings, engines and landing gear made in the UK.

Airbus said it would “start discussions with its social partners in the next few weeks regarding the 3,000 to 3,500 positions potentially impacted over the next three years”.

It makes wings for the A380 in the UK, employing 6,000 staff at Broughton and 3,000 at Filton. The firm said an increase in production of its A320 model would offer “a significant number of internal mobility opportunities”.

Airbus chief executive Tom Enders said: “The A380 is not only an outstanding engineering and industrial achievement. Passengers all over the world love to fly on this great aircraft. Hence today’s announcement is painful for us and the A380 communities worldwide.

“But, keep in mind that A380s will still roam the skies for many years to come and Airbus will of course continue to fully support the A380 operators.”

Nearly 240ft long and with space for more than 500 passengers, the A380 took the title of world’s largest passenger jet from the Boeing 747 when it took its maiden commercial flight from Singapore to Sydney on October 27 2007.

The giant aircraft’s first commercial flight to Europe - a Singapore Airlines service - arrived at Heathrow on March 3 2008.

" ,"byline": {"email": "" ,"author": ""} ,"topImages": [ {"image": {"url":"/webimage/1.4873540.1550173584!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_600/image.jpg","thumbnailUrl":"/webimage/1.4873540.1550173584!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_170/image.jpg","alt": "The firm said it had made the 'painful' decision after struggling to sell the world's largest passenger jet","width":600,"height":315,"thumbnailWidth":170,"thumbnailHeight":"auto","imageAlt": "The firm said it had made the 'painful' decision after struggling to sell the world's largest passenger jet","landscapeurl":"/webimage/1.4873540.1550173584!/image/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/landscape_595/image.jpg","landscapewidth":595,"landscapeheight":398}} ] ,"bodyImages": [ ] ,"polls":[ ] ,"videos":[ ] ,"imageGallerys":[ ] ,"externalLinks": [ ] ,"relatedList":{"count":0,"list":[ ]} }} ]}}} ]}