It was built by the chief of Clan Maclean in the 15th Century

The 13 monuments and buildings that tell 5,000 years of Scottish history

They mark the people and places that have built the story of Scotland through time.

A new book, Scotland Remembered, A History of Scotland Through Its Monuments, by Michael Meighan, takes us on a tour of the landmarks that help define the country. Here, we look at 13 which chart some of the turning points in our times.

Put in place 5,000 years ago, these standing stones predate Stonehenge monument, and were an important place for ritual activity for at least 2,000 years. The stones  probably formed a type of astronomical observatory.

1. Callanish Stones, Isle of Lewis

Put in place 5,000 years ago, these standing stones predate Stonehenge monument, and were an important place for ritual activity for at least 2,000 years. The stones probably formed a type of astronomical observatory.
Michael Meighan
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This fascinating settlement tells the story of the sophisticated ways of life of our Neolothic ancestors who lived and worked this shoreline in the north west of the  Orkney mainland 5,000 years ago.

2. Skara Brae, Orkney

This fascinating settlement tells the story of the sophisticated ways of life of our Neolothic ancestors who lived and worked this shoreline in the north west of the Orkney mainland 5,000 years ago.
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Six stones once marked out this settlement of the Picts, who emerged during the time of Roman rule of Britain but who disappeared after 500 years. This stone is considered one of the best examples of its kind.''' with the Roadside Stone one of the best examples of its kind. It with the inscription tIn all, six Pictish stones have turned up in or around Aberlemno, four of which remain on view.  The Roadside Cross, one of the Aberlemno stones, has stood in this position for around'1,200 years. (Michael Meighan Collection''. It has an elaborately decorated ringed cross flanked by adoring angels on one side, and a hunting scene on the reverse, below two large Pictish symbols. This stone is known as Aberlemno 3.[5] This stone has until recently been thought to date from the late eighth century. More recent comparative analyses have suggested that it may be of a later, mid-ninth-century origin.[9]

3. The Roadside Stone, Aberlemno, Angus

Six stones once marked out this settlement of the Picts, who emerged during the time of Roman rule of Britain but who disappeared after 500 years. This stone is considered one of the best examples of its kind.''' with the Roadside Stone one of the best examples of its kind. It with the inscription tIn all, six Pictish stones have turned up in or around Aberlemno, four of which remain on view. The Roadside Cross, one of the Aberlemno stones, has stood in this position for around'1,200 years. (Michael Meighan Collection''. It has an elaborately decorated ringed cross flanked by adoring angels on one side, and a hunting scene on the reverse, below two large Pictish symbols. This stone is known as Aberlemno 3.[5] This stone has until recently been thought to date from the late eighth century. More recent comparative analyses have suggested that it may be of a later, mid-ninth-century origin.[9]
Michael Meighan
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Distance slabs marked out sections of the Antonine Wall, the Roman Empire's most northerly frontier that ran across the Central Belt for 20 years until around 162AD. This replica marks a slab found in Boness.

4. The Bridgeness Slab Stone, Bo'Ness

Distance slabs marked out sections of the Antonine Wall, the Roman Empire's most northerly frontier that ran across the Central Belt for 20 years until around 162AD. This replica marks a slab found in Boness.
Michael Meighan
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