What are Scottish reduplicate words and why are they amazing?

The Scottish language has many amusing words, where the second element echoes the first
The Scottish language has many amusing words, where the second element echoes the first
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THE Scottish language has a long list of words and expressions where the second part echoes the first.

We take a look at 27 of the most entertaining - and uniquely Scottish - examples.



Feery-Farry is a Scottish word for a fight

Feery-Farry is a Scottish word for a fight

Catter-Batter - A quarrel or a dispute.

Clitter-Clatter - Particularly noisy and animated talk and chatter, a clattering noise, often confused and senseless conversation.

Currie-Wurrie - A dispute which ends in violence.

Diddle-Daddle - To waste or take your time. A lot of faffing about with little to show for it.

Clitter-Clatter means particularly noisy and animated chatter

Clitter-Clatter means particularly noisy and animated chatter

Feery-Farry - a fight.

Fick-Facks - A fiddling, finicking or tedious piece of work, a fuss about nothing.

Gilly-Gawkie - a foolish young person, usually referring to a female.

Haggerty-Taggerty - In a ragged state.

Glim-Glam - Another name for the childhood game Blind Man’s Buff.

Haggle-Baggle - A dispute over prolonged bargaining by someone having a hard time accepting the terms of a bargain.

Hickertie-Pickertie - Another phrase for Higgledy-Piggedly meaning confusion and disorder.

Hiddie-Giddie - Topsy turvy.

READ MORE - A history of Scottish insults



Hingum-Tringum - To be in low spirits / worthless, a dodgy character.



Hinkie-Pinkie - a Scottish description of a weak beer.



Hirrie-Harrie - An outcry after catching a thief. The Scottish equivalent of ‘Stop thief!’

Hish-Hash - Being in a mess or a muddle.



Hockerty-Cockerty - A phrase meaning to sit on another person’s shoulders.



Hodge-Podge - A very thick soup.

READ MORE - A history of the Edinburgh dialect

Scottish heritage: for stories on Scotland’s people, places and past >>

Hudderie-Dudderie - To have a scruffy and unkempt appearance.



Hurry-Burry - To feel harassed, can also mean a dispute / rumpus.

Mixter-maxter - To be in a chaotic and jumbled up state.



Pitter-Patter - To recite words quickly without giving them the careful thought and time they deserve.

Snochter-Dichter - A Scottish phrase meaning handkerchief.

Tirr-Wirr - To speak in an angry fashion.



Too-Hoo - A useless person.



Trittle-Trattle - Rubbish.


Yiff-Yaff - A small, puny, insignificant creature given to idle chatter.