Lost interiors of Alexander 'Greek' Thomson masterpiece uncovered

The fresco uncovered in the dining room of Thomson's Holmwood House. PIC: NTS.
The fresco uncovered in the dining room of Thomson's Holmwood House. PIC: NTS.
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The lost interiors of Alexander 'Greek' Thomson's domestic masterpiece have been uncovered with a fundraising campaign now launched to restore the decoration to its former glory.

Holmwood House in Cathcart, Glasgow, was designed by architect Thomson for the paper magnate James Couper and his wife in 1857 with the mighty residence considered to be his best domestic creation.

Thomson's stencilling can now be seen throughout the property with a fundraiser now launched to conserve the original designs. PIC: NTS.

Thomson's stencilling can now be seen throughout the property with a fundraiser now launched to conserve the original designs. PIC: NTS.

Ongoing Conservation work by its owners, National Trust for Scotland, has revealed an impressive array of Thomson's original decorations throughout the property.

Previous owners of the home in Netherlee Road blocked out the designs with plain paint but this has now been delicately peeled back to reveal highly intricate stencilling across a number of walls, with the designs firmly in Thomson's favoured Grecian style.

A fresco in the dining room is particularly impressive.

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National Trust for Scotland needs £120,000 to conserve, protect and research the lost interiours.

A spokesman for the charity said: "These highly colourful and intricate stencilled walls are rare examples of Thomson’s interior design schemes and the only ones open to the public. However, without urgent conservation work they could be lost forever.

"We must raise £120,000 to conserve, protect and research these interiors. By donating today you can help us re-create Thomson’s work for everyone to enjoy.

READ MORE: Alexander Greek Thomson: Scotland's forgotten architect

"The result will bring the rich colours and opulent designs vividly to life. Visitors will be able to appreciate Thomson’s genius and experience what the villa would have looked like when newly built in 1857–8. "

The house was modified in the 1920s by its then owners with Holmwood later sold to the Our Lady of the Missions, with the property then painted throughout, it is understood.

Holmwood was bought by the National Trust for Scotland in 1994.