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Aberdeen to Troon: 15 Scottish place names and their fascinating origins

If you live in or have visited Scotland, then you’ll probably have seen some of these place names.

From popular cities such as Dundee and Aberdeen to smaller visitor hotspots like Applecross and Anstruther, we take a look at a range of Scottish places and their origins.

Aberdeen was Pictish and became Gaelic-speaking in medieval times. Old Aberdeen or Aberdon means "the mouth of the Don". The Celtic word aber means "river mouth"

1. Aberdeen

Aberdeen was Pictish and became Gaelic-speaking in medieval times. Old Aberdeen or Aberdon means "the mouth of the Don". The Celtic word aber means "river mouth"
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The etymology of this Fife place (Ainestroder in 1178-1188) is not certain. The first element may be an obsolete Gaelic word n driving or aon one. The second element -struther likely denotes an obsolete word sruthair stream

2. Anstruther

The etymology of this Fife place (Ainestroder in 1178-1188) is not certain. The first element may be an obsolete Gaelic word n driving or aon one. The second element -struther likely denotes an obsolete word sruthair stream
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This name, whilst seemingly of English origin, is a reinterpretation of an earlier Aporcrossan. This is a Pictish name, meaning confluence of the Crosan river.

3. Applecross

This name, whilst seemingly of English origin, is a reinterpretation of an earlier Aporcrossan. This is a Pictish name, meaning confluence of the Crosan river.
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Made famous by the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320, the older form of this name was the longer Aberbrothock (Aberbrudoc in c. 1194), shortened in recent times to its current form.

4. Arbroath

Made famous by the Declaration of Arbroath in 1320, the older form of this name was the longer Aberbrothock (Aberbrudoc in c. 1194), shortened in recent times to its current form.
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