15 Scots from history who made America great

From the establishing the steel industry to federalising national parks, these Scots helped shape America.

Picture: Shutterstock

Since the arrival of the first emigrant ship from across the Atlantic, Scottish roots have woven into every level of US society. From the 'father of the American navy' to men like Andrew Carnegie, a pioneer of industry, philanthropy and learning, Scotland has made its mark stateside in many ways. Here are some Scots that shaped America from its infancy and others who helped create moments in popular culture.

John Muir helped federalise Americas national parks on a camping trip with President Roosevelt and yet he was relatively unknown in his native Scotland until the 1970s.

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John Paul Jones, dubbed the father of the US Navy, was born in Arbigland on 6 July 1747. At 13 he entered the service of the British Merchant Marine but went on to become a naval hero in the American Revolutionary War.
Alexander McGillivray was the son of a Scottish father and a Creek-French mother. In 1790 George Washington invited him to New York City, where he negotiated the first treaty made by the US.
David Dunbar Buick was born in Arbroath, Angus in September 17 185 and travelled to America with his family as an infant. He founded Buick Motor Company in early 1902 and immediately set to work developing a revolutionary engine.
Bobby Thomson was born in Glasgow and left for America to join his father. Thomson joined the New York baseball Giants and is best remembered for hitting baseballs most famous home run in a 1951 match against the Brooklyn Dodgers.
In 1735 with two Scots, Lieutenant Hugh Mackay and Captain George Dunbar, issued the rallying call after being hired by Georgias trustees to find men suitable to defend frontiers against Spain and France.
Scots-Indian John Ross was the principal chief of the Cherokees during the era of Indian Removal. Ross led the majority of Cherokee people in opposing Removal and led them in rebuilding the Cherokee Nation in Indian Territory.
In 1735 with two Scots, Lieutenant Hugh Mackay and Captain George Dunbar, issued the rallying call after being hired by Georgias trustees to find men suitable to defend frontiers against Spain and France.
Born in Dundee, Jimmys family moved to America when he was a month old. He went on to become the head of Disneys sound effects department and voiced Mickey Mouse from 1947-1977.
Rev John Witherspoon was the only ordained clergyman to sign the Declaration of Independence. He was born in East Lothian, and became a parish minister in Ayrshire, then Paisley, before emigrating to the colonies in 1768.
James Wilson was born near St Andrews and left for America in 1765. Wilson stated that unless Americans had representation in parliament, London had no authority over them. This argument was the basis for the American independence.
Kidd, who was reportedly born in Greenock in 1645, served as a pirate against the French in the West Indies before going to New York to suppress the rebellion of Jacob Leisler, a merchant who was later executed for treason.
Andrew Carnegie was an industrialist who led the American steel industry in the late 1800s. He sold his steel empire to J.P. Morgan in 1901. A renowned philanthropist, he spent the rest of his life reinvesting in society.
Bertie was born in New Deer in Aberdeenshire, and was the son of a shopkeeper and tailor. After attending Dundee University and writing for a local newspaper, Bertie emigrated to New York in 1904 and founded Forbes in 1917.
From Elgin, John Hossack's home became a station on the Underground Railroad. He was tried and convicted in 1860 for violating the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 by helping Jim Gray, an African American, avoid slave catchers.