Remembering the prefab houses of Scotland

They helped to stem the housing crisis following World War Two with thousands of prefabs thrown up around the country to meet the demand for a half-decent home.

Prefabs sprung up all over Scotland to meet the housing crisis that took root during World War Two. Pictured are the homes in Southhouse, Edinburgh, in the early 1970s. PIC: TSPL.

The prefabs, typically made from metal, stone blocks and wood and largely constructed in factories, were not meant to be permanent - but many ended up living in the housing for decades longer first planned.

Prefabs sprung up all over Scotland to meet the housing crisis that took root during World War Two. Pictured are the homes in Southhouse, Edinburgh, in the early 1970s. PIC: TSPL.

Sign up to our History and Heritage newsletter

Sign up to our History and Heritage newsletter

More than 32,100 prefab "bungalows" were built between 1945 and 1966. They weren't meant to be permanent - but many were lived in far longer than first planned. Pictured is Greendykes Avenue in Edinburgh in 1964. PIC: TSPL.
Those who lived in the prefabs recalled a good community spirit with some residents enjoying indoor toilets and running hot water for the first time. PIC: Dalkeith History Society
Factories sprung up over Scotland, including Sighthill in Edinburgh, to keep up with demand for the prefabs, which plugged the accommodation gap while permanent housing was delivered. PIC: TSPL.
It was said 12 semi-skilled men could put up a prefab house in an hour with the properties restricted to 2.3 metres wide so they could be transported by road. PIC: TSPL.
The walls and roof were typically made of metal and the floor was wood. "It was like being in a caravan, you used to hear the water hitting off the roof," recalled one resident of Edinburgh's Moredun prefabs (pictured). PIC: TSPL.
There were ongoing complaints about quality of some of the homes, including particular the new 'ultra modern' plumbing systems, which left the toilet flushing with hot water in some cases. PIC: TSPL.
The houses were also vulnerable to burglaries, with this woman's Pennywell home broken into three times in two years. PIC: TSPL.
They struggled to stand strong in the face of Scotland's weather, with roofs often disappearing in high winds. PIC: TSPL.
A woman polishes her windows as her neighbours' homes in Sighthill are demolished in the early 1960s. Around half of all prefabs built in Scotland were torn down. PIC: TSPL.