The long, teary goodbye for the Glasgow trams

Around a quarter of a million people gathered to wave goodbye to the Glasgow trams in September 1962.

The Glasgow trams were the last network of its kind in the country.

Tears were shed and emotions ran high as the last trams, which had served the city for 90 years, rolled through the streets for the final time.

An estimated 250,000 people took to the streets to bid farewell to Glasgows last tram which rolled into the depot for the final time this week in 1962.

Sign up to our History and Heritage newsletter

Sign up to our History and Heritage newsletter

It was an emotional day as the era of the "caurs" came to an end with one commentator claiming there was a impending sense of loss, of desolation in the air.
Many of those gathered ducked down to place a penny on the tracks so it would be squashed by the approaching tram to leave a unique souvenir of the day.
A huge crowd watched the trams enter the Coplawhill Car Works, where they had been made and maintained by armies of workers for more than 90 years. There wasn't a dry eye at the depot.
Glasgow was the last city in the UK to retain its tram system, apart from Blackpool which kept a tram rolling on the seafront.
By 1947, there were more than 1,200 trams criss-crossing the city with the Glasgow pioneering the design of new, modern vehicles.
In 1953, the decision was taken not to replace part of the ageing fleet with this regarded as the beginning of the end for the service.
In 1953, the decision was taken not to replace part of the ageing fleet with this regarded as the beginning of the end for the service.
The internal combustion engine was viewed as the future with motorbuses powered by diesel - as well as a growing train network - keeping the city moving.