These are the lockdown restrictions which could be eased in Scotland next week

Nicola Sturgeon has said Scotland could move into phase two of the route map out of lockdown when the policy is reviewed in ten days’ time.

Speaking at the Scottish Government’s press briefing on Monday, the First Minister said she hoped the country could shift, at least in part, to the next phase of the plan from June 18 – but warned the pandemic is at a “critical juncture”.

After a second consecutive day with no recorded Covid-19 deaths, Ms Sturgeon said: “This is such a crucial juncture in our battle against this virus, we will either keep going, keep beating it back as we are now or we will give it the chance to roar back with a vengeance – we must, must do the former.

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“If we break the chains of transmission even more and drive down the number of new cases to a lower base the safer it will then be to more meaningfully ease the restrictions and speed up our journey back to some normality.

Play parks may be allowed to reopen

“And if we do keep making the progress we have in the last few weeks I am optimistic that 10 days from now, at the next formal review, we will be able to move, at least in part, into the next phase of a route map out of lockdown with more individual freedom restored and more businesses able to open up and operate again.

“But that depends on all of us, it depends on each and every one of us. So please, please stick with it for now. Every day that we do does bring us closer to getting back to a form of normality.”

Here's what entering phase two of the four-stage route map out of lockdown could mean:

– Scots allowed to meet outside with larger groups, including family and friends with social distancing still in place.

– You can meet larger groups outdoors, and meet another household indoors.

– Construction, factories, warehouses, laboratories and small shops can resume work.

– Playgrounds and sports courts can reopen, and professional sport can begin again.

The Scottish Government’s four phases for easing lockdown restrictions:

Phase 1: Virus not yet contained but cases are falling. From 28 May you should be able to meet another household outside in small numbers. Sunbathing is allowed, along with some outdoor activities like golf and fishing. Garden centres and drive-through takeaways can reopen, some outdoor work can resume, and childminding services can begin.

Phase 2: Virus controlled. You can meet larger groups outdoors, and meet another household indoors. Construction, factories, warehouses, laboratories and small shops can resume work. Playgrounds and sports courts can reopen, and professional sport can begin again.

Phase 3: Virus suppressed. You can meet people from more than one household indoors. Non-essential offices would reopen, along with gyms, museums, libraries, cinemas, larger shops, pubs, restaurants, hairdressers and dentists. Live events could take place with restricted numbers and physical distancing restrictions. Schools should reopen from 11 August.

Phase 4: Virus no longer a significant threat. University and college campuses can reopen in full, mass gatherings are allowed. All workplaces open and public transport is back at full capacity.

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