More green bottles for Glenmorangie with new solar array installed at Livi site

Whisky-maker The Glenmorangie Company has boosted the green credentials of its bottling plant in Livingston by installing a new solar array, part of an eight-figure investment in its operations.

The firm said the nearly 1,500 panels cover the majority of the building’s roof, and will reduce its current on-site energy consumption by 30 per cent, contributing to its bid to achieve net zero carbon by 2040.

The installation has been carried out by West Lothian-based DB Group, in partnership with Emtec Energy, at the purpose-built Livingston site that opened in 2011. The spirits company said the solar panels are part of an expansion due to complete in 2023 that will see it doubling capacity at the facility amid global demand growing for its Glenmorangie and Ardbeg single malts.

Read More

Read More
Decarbonisation of oil and gas gains pace with tie-up to deliver green productio...

Michael Scotland, facilities and projects director at Glenmorangie, said: "We’re putting sustainability at the heart of the expansion of our Alba bottling plant. Our capacity will be increasing with new high-speed lines being installed over the coming year. At the same time, we have installed solar panels… This also gives us a clear pathway to maximise green energy across our site as we work towards our sustainability targets.”

The business’ operations director Peter Nelson said the firm is “fully” committed to building a sustainable future, and he also stated: "We have key projects already in motion or completed at our sites including the solar array at Livingston, and the installation of an anaerobic digestion plant in Tain as part of our Dornoch Environmental Enhancement Project. We also continue to work in partnership with other distilleries on new hydrogen energy trials with many more projects in the pipeline.”

The company has installed about 1,500 solar panels that cover the majority of the building’s roof, and that are set to reduce current on-site energy use by 30 per cent. Picture: contributed.
 0 comments

Want to join the conversation? Please or to comment on this article.