Outdoor holidaymakers bring £772m annual boost to Scottish economy

With staycations becoming increasingly popular, campisites and holiday parks are filling an important role, says Bob Hill of the UKCCA. Picture: Contributed
With staycations becoming increasingly popular, campisites and holiday parks are filling an important role, says Bob Hill of the UKCCA. Picture: Contributed
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Tourists staying at Scotland’s campsites and holiday parks contribute more than three-quarters of a billion pounds to the Scottish economy, according to new research.

A study published on behalf of the UK Caravan and Camping Alliance (UKCCA) found that Scotland’s outdoor holiday industry generates £772.3 million in annual spending, representing 8.4 per cent of the nation’s total tourism income.

The sector supports around 14,300 full-time jobs, predominantly in rural areas, with Scotland home to 390 campsites and holiday parks.

The research also reveals that visitors to campsites and holiday parks typically spend more and stay longer than other holidaymakers.

On average, visitors to Scotland spend £77 a day and stay 3.4 days, while campsite and holiday park guests spend between £87 and £107 per day and stay an average of 4.7 days.

The figures form part of a UK-wide study by Frontline Consultants into the economic impact of the outdoor holiday industry, and the benefits it brings to regional economies.

It revealed that outdoor holidaymakers generate a total of £9.3bn in visitor expenditure for the UK economy.

Bob Hill, who led the UKCCA joint working group, said: “This is a groundbreaking report that clearly demonstrates the important benefits which our sector brings to regional economies.

“Campsites and holiday parks are performing an important role in meeting the growing demand for staycations, and are also attracting many overseas visitors to this country.”

The UKCCA comprises the National Caravan Council, the Camping and Caravanning Club, the Caravan and Motorhome Club, and the British Holiday & Home Parks Association.