Asda shoppers show growing appetite for Scottish food and drink

Nairn's account controller Amy Morrison and Asda customer service assistant Manila Margiotta celebrate Nairn's Oat Bar listing. Picture: Ian Georgeson
Nairn's account controller Amy Morrison and Asda customer service assistant Manila Margiotta celebrate Nairn's Oat Bar listing. Picture: Ian Georgeson
Share this article
0
Have your say

Sales of locally produced food and drink across Asda’s Scottish stores has risen by 5 per cent year-on-year, with the supermarket attributing growth to its Supplier Development Academy.

The training programme, funded by the Scottish Government and delivered in partnership with Scotland Food & Drink, aims to help local companies secure listings with Asda and boost their trading potential.

Successful academy participants include: Edinburgh bakery Nairn’s, which has launched its 40 per cent less sugar Oat Bars in 32 Scottish stores; Strathmore Foods, whose Kidz Healthy Ready Meals are now sold in 54 Asda outlets; Falkirk's Mrs Tilly’s Confectionery, which launched the world’s first Scottish tablet flavoured popcorn with the supermarket this year; and Lanarkshire’s Bells Food Group, which is supplying three new lines of Scottish pies.

Lucy Husband, UK market development manager of Scotland Food & Drink, said: “Over the last eight months the 22 participating suppliers have all developed their capabilities and deepened relationships with both the Asda local sourcing team and their UK wide colleagues to mutual benefit.

"The tangible successes with listings going national and new own label contracts is superb to see and is testament to Asda’s commitment to showcasing and increasing sales of Scottish food and drink while providing a stronger offering to consumers."

Michael McCallion, Asda's senior buying manager local foods, added: “Where Asda can take a local product and find it a national market the benefits are multiple - sales increase, customers get better choice and quality, and suppliers get the confidence and scale to make the move from small to medium to large businesses. Often that means more local jobs and more investment with local primary producers."

READ MORE: Islay brewery doubles sales after grant boost