Music review: The Divine Comedy, Old Fruitmarket, Glasgow

Divine Comedy frontman Neil Hannon and band take their Office Politics seriously
Divine Comedy frontman Neil Hannon and band take their Office Politics seriously
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THE Divine Comedy have committed admirably to the concept of current album, Office Politics. A large office clock loomed over the stage, its hands periodically altered as frontman Neil Hannon and band/workmates advanced through the working day, from wistful unrequited romance on the morning commute (Commuter Love) all the way to the ignominious fag end of the office party, encountering fear and loathing of the photocopier and characters such as veteran accountant Billy Bird along the way.

The Divine Comedy, Old Fruitmarket, Glasgow ***

But this was also an office environment where no one was really watching the clock – it was 9pm before you knew it – where Hannon went all out on dress-up Thursday in a shocking pink suit (“a bit Showaddywaddy, but I like it”) and some wag on the warehouse floor offered the obligatory heckle for My Lovely Horse.

Proving it wasn’t just another day at the office, the lean funk of Office Politics, heavy glam rock of Infernal Machines and Blondie-meets-Popcorn of Europop sat alongside the more familiar propulsive, perky pop of Generation Sex.

Soon enough it was time to don the party hats and gird yourself for regret, while two small balloons bobbed forlornly across the crowd during At the Indie Disco.

But no one had to pretend to have a good time during the campfire encore, with the entire band gathered around one microphone for a brief busker take on George Michael’s Faith, the fragrant waltz of Songs of Love and an enthusiastic communal celebration of the joys of coach travel on National Express.

FIONA SHEPHERD