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Ryder Cup: Students to benefit from Europe clash with USA

Picture: Neil Hanna

Picture: Neil Hanna

  • by MARTIN DEMPSTER
 

NEXT year’s Ryder Cup at Gleneagles has earned 12 students at Scottish education facilities the first bursaries to be funded through the biennial event.

The bursaries, which are for courses relevant to the Ryder Cup, have been awarded to students at the University of Stirling, Queen Margaret University and Perth College UHI.

The grants, which amount to £1,000 per year for the next five years, will help the students, who are studying tourism, hospitality and management courses, pay for their travel and accommodation.

“Ryder Cup Europe is delighted to announce the launch of our bursary scheme, which will benefit students studying at three Scottish education institutions,” said Richard Hills, the event’s European director. “This completes a range of educational commitments made by Ryder Cup Europe, covering primary through to further education initiatives.

“The 2014 Ryder Cup will bring major benefits to the local and Scottish economy and we want to leave a lasting legacy for generations to come. We hope these students will go on to contribute to the Scottish tourism and hospitality industries for years to come.”

The announcement was welcomed by European team captain Paul McGinley, who did a three-year marketing diploma in Dublin and a four-year degree in international business at the University of San Diego before carving out his successful golf career.

“The 2014 Ryder Cup will inspire a generation of young people and I know from personal experience the benefit that management courses can bring,” said the Irishman.

“The investment announced today by Ryder Cup Europe will encourage young people to apply for management and hospitality courses which will help create the next generation of tourism and business leaders in Scotland and beyond.”

Among the recipients is Allana McVicar, a student from Perth who is studying Hospitality Management at Perth College UHI.

“To be one of the first students in the world to benefit from the Ryder Cup in this way feels great,” said the 18-year-old. “I am very grateful for the financial help, which will be put to good use to help me with my studies. It’s made me even more excited for the Ryder Cup starting next year.”

 

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