Scottish B&B first to only accept bikers as overnight guests

Torguish House plans to welcome only guests who arrive by motorcycle.
Torguish House plans to welcome only guests who arrive by motorcycle.
Share this article
0
Have your say

They are often maligned visitors who have faced blanket bans from pubs and guest houses across the UK amid claims of anti-social behaviour and leaking modes of transport.

But now a Scottish B&B has become the first in the country to only accept bikers as overnight guests.

Ben Moor runs the property with his parents Angie and Mike, and all are keen bikers.

Ben Moor runs the property with his parents Angie and Mike, and all are keen bikers.

Torguish House, five miles south of Inverness, at the start of the popular NC500 touring route, has been biker-friendly for 11 years, but until now has also welcomed other tourists.

Now it has announced plans to become “100 per cent biker” from the beginning of next year. It will refuse bookings from anyone else after finding that bikers treat the 17th-century former manse better than “ordinary” guests do.

Ben Moor runs the property with his parents, Angie and Mike Moor, and all are keen bikers. He said bikers had faced prejudice for decades.

“Bikers have had a really bad reputation. Going back 20 years, you couldn’t get in a hotel or B&B – as soon as they saw your bike, you would be turned away. Even now, a lot of B&Bs still don’t like bikers. But now, people who ride motorbikes don’t cause any trouble – a lot of them are doctors and lawyers who hang up their suit at the weekend and put on their biking gear. It’s a hobby.

“We are trying to go full circle from bikers not being very welcome to only bikers being welcome.”

Caroline Warburton, national tourism strategy co-ordinator of the Scottish Tourism Alliance, said: “What Torguish House is planning to do shows a real depth of understanding of their target market, confidence in their business and that all-important focus on delivering a better than ‘good enough’ experience, having in-depth knowledge of their target audience.”

Chris Taylor, VisitScotland regional partnerships director, pointed to the tourism agency’s Bikers Welcome scheme, which lists almost 200 businesses.

He said: “Bikers are drawn to the Highlands because of its long, quiet, scenic roads and diverse countryside. Torguish House seems to already be a popular stop-off point for bikers, and the fact it is run by bikers will add to the appeal for bike tourists.”