Adventurer in daring high wire walk to Orkney’s Old Man of Hoy

A German adventurer has become the first person to walk to and from the summit of the Old Man of Hoy on a high wire. Alexander Schulz completed the walk 137m above the sea on a line 180m long.  Picture: Dan Hunt
A German adventurer has become the first person to walk to and from the summit of the Old Man of Hoy on a high wire. Alexander Schulz completed the walk 137m above the sea on a line 180m long. Picture: Dan Hunt
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Dramatic pictures show a daredevil adventurer walking a tightrope from one of Britain’s tallest sea stacks -- at a height of 449 feet.

Alexander Schulz became the first man to walk to and from the summit of the Old Man of Hoy in Orkney on Saturday.

It is the latest achievement for the German thrillseeker who holds five world records in his passion of slacklining.

Slacklining is the word given to walking along a suspended length of flat webbing which is held together by two anchors

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Alexander Schulz says completing the remarkable walk, which was 449 feet above sea level and 590 feet long, was an “amazing feeling”.

The team behind the project say they used only natural anchors and no bolts and that the tension in the line posed no threat to the rock.

Alexander said he was “stunned” by the location and that it had taken two months of planning by a team of eight to make his dream walk a reality.

He added: “Being a slackliner and seeing pictures of The Old Man of Hoy it was absolutely clear what was missing there.

“It was a dream to walk that line and it became reality.

“We have been very lucky with the weather and it was a fantastic time with great people. Thanks to the team.”

The Old Man of Hoy is a red sandstone stack and perched on a plinth of basalt rock which is popular with climbers and is thought to be less than 250 years old.

In 1966, around 15 million people watched a live broadcast of an ascent up the stunning rock.