First conviction in Scotland under new ‘revenge porn’ laws

A new law which will make it easier for people to be prosecuted for sharing intimate images without consent will came into force on Monday.
A new law which will make it easier for people to be prosecuted for sharing intimate images without consent will came into force on Monday.
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A man who threatened to put intimate footage of a former partner online has become the first person to be convicted in Scotland under new tougher legislation.

READ MORE: New revenge porn laws could see offenders jailed for five years

Kenneth Robinson, 59, was banned from approaching or contacting his victim for three years after pleading guilty to sending her numerous emails and repeatedly threatening to upload a video to the internet.

He was also ordered to pay his former partner £200 in compensation.

Robinson, from Northumberland, was sentenced at Jedburgh Sheriff Court on Monday and is the first person convicted under the updated law cracking down on so-called revenge porn which came into force in July.

The new legislation means those convicted of disclosing or threatening to disclose an intimate photo or video face a maximum penalty of five years in prison.

The change was backed by a Scottish Government information campaign featuring posters with images of mobile phones showing pictures of nude models covered in crime scene tape alongside a warning of the maximum jail term.

Anne Marie Hicks, National Procurator Fiscal for domestic abuse, said such offences are often “online domestic abuse”.

She said: “This conviction under the new legislation sends a clear message that behaviour like this is unacceptable and that those who disclose or threaten to disclose intimate images will be dealt with seriously by the criminal justice system.

“This type of offending is often used as a form of online domestic abuse.

“It is designed to cause fear, alarm or distress and often used to humiliate, threaten and control the victim.

“Those affected may be too embarrassed to come forward or fear they will be blamed.

“I hope the prosecution and outcome in this case will provide reassurance to victims and that they will have greater confidence to report cases.

“This type of offending is never acceptable and victims are in no way responsible just because they may have consented to an image being taken.”