Boston Marathon: FBI release image of suspects

The FBI released still pictures and video of their two suspects today. Picture: AP/FBI

The FBI released still pictures and video of their two suspects today. Picture: AP/FBI

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The FBI has released photos and video of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings and appealed for the public’s help in identifying the men.

FBI agent Richard DesLauriers told how the images had been taken from surveillance cameras near the explosion sites shortly before Monday’s deadly blasts at the world-famous sporting event.

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama at the prayer service. Picture: Getty

President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama at the prayer service. Picture: Getty

One of the suspects is believed to have planted the devices near the finish line.

He said the men were considered to be “armed and extremely dangerous,” and asked the public not to approach the men. He added that there is no additional danger that the FBI knows of now.

The images came out hours after President Barack Obama promised a grieving city to hunt down whoever was responsible.

He promised justice for those killed and injured in Monday’s marathon bombing, telling survivors: “Your resolve is the greatest rebuke to whoever has committed this heinous act.”

A nun hugs a woman at the service. Picture: Getty

A nun hugs a woman at the service. Picture: Getty

As the FBI continues the hunt for the perpetrators, with the head of Homeland Security appealing to the public to help identify two men captured on video at the scene, the president rallied the community at an inter-faith “service of healing”, issuing words of comfort to the grieving and a warning to the perpetrators.

“We will find you and yes, you will face justice,” he said. “We will find you, we will hold you accountable, but more than that our fidelity to our way of life, to our free and open society, will only grow stronger.”

He added: “We may be momentarily knocked off our feet but we’ll pick ourselves up, we’ll keep going, we will finish the race.”

The multi-faith service, held half a mile from the finishing line where two bombs killed three people and injured 176, brought together political and religious leaders with members of the community, including families of some of the victims.

About half of the 2,000 seats were reserved for emergency personnel whose actions are credited with having saved many lives amid the chaos of the attack, which was wreaked against the backdrop of what the president described as a “26.2-mile test of dedication and grit and the human spirit”.

He added: “Our prayers are with those who are wounded, some gravely. From their beds, some of them are surely watching us gather here today and, if you are, know this: As you begin this long journey of recovery, your city is with you, your country is with you.

“We will all be with you as you learn to stand and, yes, run again. Of that I have no doubt, you will run again.”

The dead were Martin Richard, eight, and Krystle Campbell, 29, both Boston locals, and Lu Lingzi, 23, a Chinese student who was studying for a master’s degree in statistics at Boston University.

Charles Buchanan, a Boston firefighter for 40 years, wept yesterday as he told of how he pulled a sheet over the body of Martin Richard after finding him lifeless in the street, and of rescuing the little boy’s seven-year-old sister, Jane, who suffered a severe leg wound. The children’s mother suffered a brain injury that required surgery.

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