World’s first whisky-powered car driven in Edinburgh

The 
World's first car to be fuelled by whisky residue biofuel takes it's inaugural journey. Picture; Lesley Martin
The World's first car to be fuelled by whisky residue biofuel takes it's inaugural journey. Picture; Lesley Martin
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The world’s first car that uses whisky has fuel has been test-driven in Edinburgh.

Made by residue from whisky, the biobutanol, is designed as a direct replacement for petrol and diesel.

The car was test driven in Edinburgh. Picture; Lesley Martin

The car was test driven in Edinburgh. Picture; Lesley Martin

Engines of vehciles do not need to have modified engines to use the fuel.

The fuel is produced from a yeast based by-product made from distilling and fermentation.

The vehicle was test driven using the fuel for the first time today at Edinburgh Napier University.

Investors of the fuel see it as a potential alternative which can power the vehicle without the need to modify its engine.

It was created by Celtic Renewables Ltd, a spinout company from Edinburgh Napier University, who also worked with Perthshire’s Tullibardine Distillery on the project.

According to Celtic Renewables founder and president Prof Martin Tangney said the residue was of no value whatsoever to the whisky industry.

He said: “This is the first time in history that a car has ever been driven with a biofuel produced from whisky production residues.

“It is fitting to do this historic drive in Scotland, which is famous not just for its world-renowned whisky but also for being a powerhouse for renewable energy.”

The Edinburgh-based company recently received a £9m government grant to build a plant to develop the fuel.

It is hoped this will be up and running by 2019.