Women’s Institute knit jackets for homeless dogs

Springer spaniel Barney has a new jacket, courtesy of the SWI. Picture: Contributed

Springer spaniel Barney has a new jacket, courtesy of the SWI. Picture: Contributed

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KNITTERS from Scotland’s Women’s Institutes (SWI) have stepped in to help dozens of homeless dogs being discriminated against because of the colour of their fur.

The SWI aim to help the pooches find their forever homes by creating colourful woollen overcoats.

SWI knitter Winnie Anderson works on a dog jacket to help banish Black Dog Syndrome. Picture: Contributed

SWI knitter Winnie Anderson works on a dog jacket to help banish Black Dog Syndrome. Picture: Contributed

Black Dog Syndrome results in dark-coated dogs being overlooked by potential new owners in favour of those that are lighter-coloured.

It means that dogs with black or dark fur tend to remain in the care of The Scottish Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (Scottish SPCA) for longer periods of time.

After learning about the discrimination being faced by the homeless hounds, SWI approached fellow charity the Scottish SPCA offering their members’ services to knit ‘coats of many colours.’

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It is hoped the technicoloured coats – created as part of the celebrations to mark 100 years of the SWI – will make dark-coloured dogs more attractive to potential re-homers.

SWI national chairman Christine Hutton said: “We are encouraging our members to pick up their knitting needles and help a homeless hound.

“It’s a mission to help end Black Dog Syndrome, a phenomenon whereby potential new owners overlook black dogs in favour of their lighter-coated counterparts. “Some of Scotland’s top craftswomen are making multi-coloured dog coats in aid of homeless pets desperately seeking loving new homes – to boost their appeal and help them become rehomed more quickly.

“It’s sad to think of black dogs being less appealing simply because of the colour of their coat, but we hope that our knitters will be able to kit them out in coats of many colours and improve the chances of them being rehomed more quickly.”

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