Windfarm woes

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I am constantly amazed that only industrial scale windfarms get blamed for despoiling the countryside (Letters, 6 September).

The vast number of single and/or smaller turbines being approved in inappropriate locations is just as much, if not more of a concern.

The impact of an individual turbine of any size is often considered insignificant by planning authorities and is not subject to the same level of environmental assessment as its larger counterparts, making it cheaper and easier for the applicant to secure planning permission.

The result is a vast windfarm by stealth, littering the countryside with structures of various sizes, designs, colours and rotation speeds, creating the kind of visual confusion more associated with a funfair from hell. No good to man or beast, unless you are on the receiving end of the lucrative subsidies involved.

Aileen Jackson

Uplawmoor

East Renfrewshire

The UK Government’s energy policy will lead to blackouts this winter. This smacks of a Third World nation.

The decision to spend billions on green energy has proved to be an expensive disaster. Delays in restarting four key nuclear power stations in England could bring about an electricity crisis. Already in place are “dirty” diesel generators, operated by private companies, which will be switched on when electricity supplies are critical. It is a sign of desperation that the National Grid has contacted owners of recently closed gas, oil and coal plants to see if they can be up and running in time for winter.

And Scotland? Alex Salmond’s aggressive stance on wind turbines will cause blackouts.

England will need every unit of electricity for its own use so why should it export electricity if Scotland votes Yes?

Clark Cross

Springfield Road,

Linlithgow

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