Wind energy output ‘could power most Scots homes’

In six out of 12 months, wind generated enough power to supply more than 100 per cent of household needs, claims WWF Scotland. Picture: TSPL

In six out of 12 months, wind generated enough power to supply more than 100 per cent of household needs, claims WWF Scotland. Picture: TSPL

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Wind power output hit record levels last year, generating enough energy to supply the electrical needs of 97 per cent of Scottish homes.

Turbines provided 10,392,439 MWh of electricity to the National Grid, enough on average to supply 2.34 million homes, up 16 per cent compared to the previous year.

2015 was a huge year for renewables, with wind turbines and solar panels helping ensure millions of tonnes of climate-damaging carbon emissions were avoided

Lang Banks, Director WWF Scotland

Analysis carried out by WWF Scotland of data that was provided by WeatherEnergy found that in six out of 12 months, wind generated enough power to supply more than 100 per cent of Scottish household needs.

With business and industry factored in, wind power generated the equivalent of 41 per cent of Scotland’s entire electricity needs for the year.

For homes fitted with solar PV panels, there was enough sunshine in Aberdeen, 
Edinburgh, Glasgow or Inverness to generate an estimated 100 per cent or more of the electricity needs of an average home during April and May.

In December, wind turbines generated enough power to supply more than 100 per cent of Scottish households on 29 out of 31 days.

During the month, around 1,352,399 MWh of electricity was provided to the National Grid, enough on average for the electrical needs of 148 per cent of Scottish households. WWF Scotland director Lang Banks said: “Without doubt, 2015 was a huge year for renewables, with wind turbines and solar panels helping to ensure millions of tonnes of climate-damaging carbon emissions were avoided.

“With 2016 being a critical year politically, we’d like to see each of the political parties back policies that would enable Scotland to become the EU’s first fully renewable electricity nation by 2030.”

Energy minister Fergus Ewing said: “Scotland’s renewables sector is stronger than ever and our early adoption of clean, green energy technology and infrastructure was the right thing to do.”

Scottish Labour’s environmental justice spokeswoman Sarah Boyack MSP said: “We urgently need more support for householders and businesses to get on and install solar systems to produce heat and electricity.”

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