Who should be Scotland’s first official heroine?

Mary Slessor, Missionary, (1848-1915), was a celebrated missionary whose work in Africa was inspired by David Livingstone. 
She worked tirelessly to improve quality of life in Calabar and  challenged local superstitions and beliefs to save the lives of twins and their mothers. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

Mary Slessor, Missionary, (1848-1915), was a celebrated missionary whose work in Africa was inspired by David Livingstone. She worked tirelessly to improve quality of life in Calabar and challenged local superstitions and beliefs to save the lives of twins and their mothers. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

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The search is on for the first woman to enter Scotland’s Hall of Fame at the National Wallace Monument.

The public is now be asked to help decide which woman should be immortalised alongside figures such as King Robert the Bruce, John Knox and Sir Walter Scott.

Nancy Riach, swimmer, (1927-1947), held 28 Scottish and British swimming records by the time she was 17. Following her death from polio aged 20,  	she was hailed as the finest swimmer that the British Empire had ever produced. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

Nancy Riach, swimmer, (1927-1947), held 28 Scottish and British swimming records by the time she was 17. Following her death from polio aged 20, she was hailed as the finest swimmer that the British Empire had ever produced. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

On the shortlist in the Arts, Culture & Sport category are Gaelic poet Màiri Mhòr nan Òran (1821-1898), Glasgow artist Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh (1864-1933), folk singer Jean Redpath (1937-2014) and champion swimmer Nancy Riach (1927-1947).

Doctor and suffragette Elsie Inglis (1864-1917), doctor and women’s rights campaigner Sophia Jex Blake (1840-1912) and co-founder of Maggie’s Centres, Maggie Keswick Jencks (1941-1995), made the shortlist in the Medicine Category.

Automobile engineer, racing car driver and entrepreneur Dorothée Pullinger (1894-1986) made the Science and Engineering Category along with marine engineer Victoria Drummond (1894-1978), Jessie Chrystal MacMillan (1872 -1937), the first female science graduate, and Mary Somerville (1780 - 1872), a scientist, astronomer and mathematician.

The Public Life nominees are Scotland’s first female archaeologist, Christian Maclagan (1811-1901), Jane Haining, the Church of Scotland missionary in Hungary and Mary Slessor (1848-1915), the missionary who transformed living standards and education in Africa.

Victoria Drummond,  Engineer, (1894-1978), was  the first female marine engineer in Britain and the first British woman to serve as chief engineer with the Merchant Navy. 
As a result of her courage under fire at sea during World War II, she was awarded a MBE in 1941 and was the first woman to receive the Lloyd's War Medal for Bravery at Sea. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Victoria Drummond, Engineer, (1894-1978), was the first female marine engineer in Britain and the first British woman to serve as chief engineer with the Merchant Navy. As a result of her courage under fire at sea during World War II, she was awarded a MBE in 1941 and was the first woman to receive the Lloyd's War Medal for Bravery at Sea. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Chair of Stirling District Tourism, Zillah Jamieson, said: “These historic female figures have been chosen because they have shaped Scotland’s history and surprised delighted and inspired generation after generation after generation with their determination, fortitude and spirit –the very values which William Wallace stood for.”

To cast your vote, visit www.nationalwallacemonument.com or visit the National Wallace Monument in person. The deadline for final entries is 31st March 2017.

200 Voices: find out more about the people who have shaped Scotland

Sophia Jex-Blake, Doctor, (1840-1912),  led a campaign to allow woman to graduate in medicine at Edinburgh University. After qualifying in Switzerland, she went on to found the Edinburgh School of Medicine for Women and  lectured in midwifery at the School of Medicine of the Royal Colleges. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

Sophia Jex-Blake, Doctor, (1840-1912), led a campaign to allow woman to graduate in medicine at Edinburgh University. After qualifying in Switzerland, she went on to found the Edinburgh School of Medicine for Women and lectured in midwifery at the School of Medicine of the Royal Colleges. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

M�iri  Mh�r nan Oran was the most prolific of the 19th Century Gaelic poets and a campaigner for crofters rights.

Born in Skye, she worked as a nurse to a wealthy family in Inverness and was sentenced to 40 days in jail after being wrongly accused of theft. She became the voice of the oppressed with her songs  still widely sung today. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

M�iri Mh�r nan Oran was the most prolific of the 19th Century Gaelic poets and a campaigner for crofters rights. Born in Skye, she worked as a nurse to a wealthy family in Inverness and was sentenced to 40 days in jail after being wrongly accused of theft. She became the voice of the oppressed with her songs still widely sung today. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

Mary Somerville, Scientist, (1780-1872), was an outstanding	 mathematician, astronomer, scientist and successful writer of	the Victorian era. She was one of the first two women elected as honorary members of the Royal Astronomical Society and Somerville College, Oxford, was named after her. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Mary Somerville, Scientist, (1780-1872), was an outstanding mathematician, astronomer, scientist and successful writer of the Victorian era. She was one of the first two women elected as honorary members of the Royal Astronomical Society and Somerville College, Oxford, was named after her. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Margaret	Macdonald Mackintosh, Artist	(1864 -1933), was a defining talent of the  "Glasgow Style" during the 1890s.		
WWorking in watercolour, metalwork,embroidery and textiles, she also collaborated with her husband, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, on a number of projects. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Margaret Macdonald Mackintosh, Artist (1864 -1933), was a defining talent of the "Glasgow Style" during the 1890s. WWorking in watercolour, metalwork,embroidery and textiles, she also collaborated with her husband, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, on a number of projects. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Maggie Keswick Jencks (1941-1995)  co-founded Maggies Centres for cancer care following her own diagnosis with the disease.	
A  writer,	gardener	 and designer,  she created the blueprint for the centres which have delivered patient-led care to thousands of people  in an architecturally exceptional environment. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Maggie Keswick Jencks (1941-1995) co-founded Maggies Centres for cancer care following her own diagnosis with the disease. A writer, gardener and designer, she created the blueprint for the centres which have delivered patient-led care to thousands of people in an architecturally exceptional environment. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Jessie Chrystal Macmillan, campaigner,(1872-1937) was a barrister, politican, suffragette, pacifist and the first female science graduate from Edinburgh University, where she has a building named after her. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

Jessie Chrystal Macmillan, campaigner,(1872-1937) was a barrister, politican, suffragette, pacifist and the first female science graduate from Edinburgh University, where she has a building named after her. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

Jean Redpath, Musician, (1937-2014), was an internationally regarded folk singer, educator and musician who was was considered by many to be the voice of Scots traditional song., She was awarded a MBE in 1987 for her  services  to music. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Jean Redpath, Musician, (1937-2014), was an internationally regarded folk singer, educator and musician who was was considered by many to be the voice of Scots traditional song., She was awarded a MBE in 1987 for her services to music. PIC The Wallace Monument.

Jane Haining, (1897-1944), was a Church of Scotland missionary and matron at the Jewish Girls' Home in Budapest during WWII. Following the invasion of Hungary, she was arrested	by the Gestapo and sent to Auschwitz, where she died. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

Jane Haining, (1897-1944), was a Church of Scotland missionary and matron at the Jewish Girls' Home in Budapest during WWII. Following the invasion of Hungary, she was arrested by the Gestapo and sent to Auschwitz, where she died. PIC: The Wallace Monument.

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