Tory MP ‘may send PMQs question to Jeremy Corbyn’

Andrew Griffiths said he would write to Jeremy Corbyn. Picture: Contributed
Andrew Griffiths said he would write to Jeremy Corbyn. Picture: Contributed
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A TORY MP has suggested he may resort to sending questions to Jeremy Corbyn after he missed the cut during Prime Minister’s Questions.

Andrew Griffiths (Burton) was on the list of MPs selected to ask a question during the prime-time session but raised concerns that backbenchers could miss out under the new approach.

He joked a question from “Andrew from Burton” being read out by Labour leader Mr Corbyn next week would indicate he has resolved the issue.

In frontbench exchanges which lasted longer than normal, Mr Corbyn read out queries from Marie, Steven, Paul, Claire, Gail and Angela on various issues. The SNP, as the third largest party, also has two questions guaranteed at PMQs.

Raising a point of order, Mr Griffiths said he knew Speaker John Bercow has held concerns over the public impression of MPs due to PMQs.

He told Mr Bercow: “Today we saw new politics and a new style of PMQs in operation and we will wait to see how the public view that.

“But one of the consequences of today’s PMQs was that it was actually 22 minutes before we got on to question two on the order paper.

“As well as being a champion of reforming PMQs, you’ve also been an advocate of backbenchers and having our voices heard.”

He added: “Do you share my concern that in having a new style of Prime Minister’s Questions we could actually see backbenchers limited from being able to ask their important questions?”

Mr Griffiths also joked: “Indeed, I was number 10 on the order paper today, we got through to number nine.

“If next week the leader of the Opposition reads out a question from Andrew from Burton you will know I have found a new way to get my question across.”

Mr Bercow replied: “A change in style of Prime Minister’s Questions, which is not a matter for me but is perfectly legitimate and may well be something widely welcomed, need not and must not delay progress through the order paper.”