Theresa May says Tories will ‘target extremists’

Banning Orders and Extremism Disruption Orders (EDOs) would be in the next Conservative manifesto, Mrs May announced at the Tory conference. Picture: Getty

Banning Orders and Extremism Disruption Orders (EDOs) would be in the next Conservative manifesto, Mrs May announced at the Tory conference. Picture: Getty

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THE Home Secretary Theresa May has said a future Conservative Government would seek further powers to tackle extremism.

Banning Orders and Extremism Disruption Orders (EDOs) would be in the next Conservative manifesto, Mrs May announced at the Tory conference.

The new Banning Orders would allow authorities to outlaw extremist groups, even if they did not pose a terrorist threat.

In a speech in which she said that British values would “prevail” over extremism, Mrs May said EDOs would allow courts to restrict the movement and activities of individuals to prevent risk of violence or public disorder.

EDOs would enable the UK Government to target so-called hate-preachers.

Mrs May unveiled the anti-extremism measures during a speech that followed reports that posts by extremists on Facebook and Twitter would be the target of controls.

In addition, Mrs launched a cross-government counter-extremism strategy that will move away from the “hard end of the extremism spectrum” and tackle not only Islamist extremists, but neo-Nazis and other hardline groups.

“I want to see new banning orders for extremist groups that fall short of the existing laws relating to terrorism,” Mrs May said.

“I want to see new civil powers to target extremists who stay just within the law but still spread poisonous hatred. So both policies - Banning Orders and Extremism Disruption Orders will be in the next Conservative manifesto.”

On her counter extremism strategy, Mrs May said it would overseen by the Home Office, but would be the responsibility of the whole of Government, the public sector and wider civil society.

“It will aim to undermine and eliminate extremism in all its forms - neo-Nazism and other forms of extremism as well as Islamist extremis and it will aim to build up society to identify extremism, confront it, challenge it and defeat it.”

With around seven months to the General Election, Mrs May expressed frustration with her Lib Dem coalition partners.

The Home Secretary said it was “outrageously irresponsible” that the Lib Dems had “torpedoed” the Communications Data Bill - proposed legislation that would have given police greater online surveillance powers.

Mrs May also paid tribute to the Scottish hostage David Haine, who was murdered by IS terrorists.

Condemning the “deadly terrorist threat we face”, Mrs May added: “David Haines was a tireless humanitarian worker who helped Muslims - not just in Syria - but in Bosnia, South Sudan and Libya. Two weeks ago he was murdered by terrorists simply for being British.”

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