End of the road for paper car-tax disc

The disc was introduced in 1921, but from Wednesday there will be no need for motorists to display the vehicle excise duty (VED) disc on their car windscreens. Picture: TSPL

The disc was introduced in 1921, but from Wednesday there will be no need for motorists to display the vehicle excise duty (VED) disc on their car windscreens. Picture: TSPL

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MORE THAN 90 years of car history will come to an end this week with the abolition of the paper car-tax disc.

The disc was introduced in 1921, but from Wednesday there will be no need for motorists to display the vehicle excise duty (VED) disc on their car windscreens.

This may be the end for the paper disc but, alas for motorists, the need to pay car tax continues, with motorists being offered the choice of applying for VED renewal online or by visiting a Post Office.

One key change is that from Wednesday, those buying a vehicle will not be able to take advantage of the remaining months and days of the car’s existing VED and will need to renew the tax.

Those selling a vehicle will be able to claim a refund from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) for unused months of road tax.

Those who have not paid their tax will be spotted on automatic number plate recognition cameras or by police checking VED data information.

The RAC has expressed fears that, with the end of the paper disc, the number of motorists failing to pay VED could become as high as the number who drive without insurance.

The motoring organisation said that this could result in a £167 million a year loss to the Exchequer.

But the DVLA has said there is “no basis” to the RAC figures, adding that it was “nonsense” to suggest that getting rid of the tax disc would lead to an increase in vehicle tax evasion.

SEE ALSO:

Lori Anderson: Tax disc goodbye ‘end of an era’

Letter: Tax disc display

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