British Antarctic Survey looking to recruit at research outpost

Penguins on Antarctica

Penguins on Antarctica

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THE British Antarctic Survey (BAS) has launched a recruitment drive to find highly-skilled tradespeople to work at its research centre in Antarctica.

Despite temperatures as low as minus 40C, and months of near-constant darkness, the organisation hope to recruit hardy carpenters, builders, technicians, electricians and chefs.

Antarctic

Antarctic

The BAS say the jobs will prove an “opportunity of a lifetime” for candidates - who will be offered a starting salary of around £24,000 plus living expenses.

Contracts will run for a minimum of four months and employees will share the icy continent with penguins, whales and seals.

BAS’ HR business partner James Miller, said: “We have world-class laboratories, accommodation buildings, offices and technical facilities at our five scientific research stations in Antarctica.

“We need the best trades and support professionals to keep everything running smoothly and to provide top quality support to our science programme.

The chance to work on the ice surrounded by stunning scenery, icebergs, penguins, whales and seals is an opportunity of a lifetime

BAS’ HR business partner James Miller

“The chance to work on the ice surrounded by stunning scenery, icebergs, penguins, whales and seals is an opportunity of a lifetime and will be a fantastic experience.”

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Mechanical tervices technician, Thomas Clements, is currently working at BAS’s most southerly research station, Halley.

He said: “My advice for anyone contemplating a job with British Antarctic Survey would be - don’t think twice! I’ve made some fantastic memories down here which will stay with me for a lifetime.”

Tradesperson working in Antartica. Picture: British Antarctic Survey

Tradesperson working in Antartica. Picture: British Antarctic Survey

The British Antarctic Survey has operated five research bases at the South Pole since the late 1950s.

Antarctic

Antarctic

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