Three pedestrians die on Scotland’s roads

Robbie Quigg.

Robbie Quigg.

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THREE people, one a six-year-old boy, were killed on Thursday, bringing the number of pedestrians to die on Scotland’s roads to six in a week.

He was taken by ambulance to Inverclyde Royal Infirmary but died of his injuries early on Thursday.

Tributes left in Greenock where a six-year-old boy died after being hit by a car as he crossed the road. Picture: Hemedia

Tributes left in Greenock where a six-year-old boy died after being hit by a car as he crossed the road. Picture: Hemedia

Police Scotland Sergeant Kenny Malaney, of the Paisley divisional road policing unit, said: “This was a serious incident which has tragically resulted in the death of a young boy. My thoughts are with the family.”

An elderly woman died after being hit by a lorry on the A96 in Nairn on Thursday afternoon. Another woman was seriously injured.

Shortly after that crash, a man was killed when he was struck by a car on the A96 near Huntly at around 5.30pm.

Elderly woman dies in lorry crash

The incidents follow the death of a nine-year-old boy after being hit by a car on the A90 dual carriageway at Longforgan, east of Dundee, at around 9:20pm last Friday. On Saturday, Lee Galloway-Forbes, 45, died in hospital after being hit by a car on North Esplanade West in Aberdeen on 7 September. A 45-year-old man died on Tuesday after being hit by a motorcycle while crossing Calder Street in Coatbridge, Lanarkshire, around 8:45pm on Monday.

Pedestrian deaths on Scotland’s roads increased by 18 to 56 last year, including six in the Glasgow bin lorry crash in December. However, it was lower than the 2012 total of 60.

Neil Greig, of the Institute of Advanced Motorists, said: “These are shocking incidents which all appear to have different causes but which illustrate once again that new car technology is lowering risk for car occupants but not for pedestrians. The Scottish Government is looking at a campaign to reduce death and injury to pedestrians and cyclists in 2016, and it clearly cannot come too soon.”

Stuart Hay, head of Living Streets Scotland, which campaigns for pedestrians, said: “While overall trends have over time improved, incidents like this are a stark reminder of the need for continued investment in road safety.”

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